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Is there any way to explicitly do name mangling (also called name decoration) in a library written in c(or cpp).I want all the symbols of my shared library to have their names mangled.

Consider this question: Two library of different versions in an application In this if I can explicitly have all their names mangled , I think i can resolve that issue.May be there is some option in gcc compiler itself to do this.

  • Basically your proposed "name mangling" is the same as that proposed in the comments of your other question: rename the symbols in one of the libraries. You already rejected that. – Andrew Henle Jul 16 at 14:10
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    XY problem? Why are you trying to mangle things? – SergeyA Jul 16 at 14:17
  • C doesn’t support name mangling. You can probably do it in C++. – Jonathan Leffler Jul 16 at 14:31
  • @AndrewHenle I didnt reject that idea. Actually the only way i know is by using --default-symver , and --default-symver is not exactly name mangling. And i dont want to rename all function in my code. I need something which can do symbol rename or name mangling , without much code changes. – Abhishek Garg Jul 16 at 17:57
  • @SergeyA i need name mangling as the solution to the problem stackoverflow.com/questions/56947406/… – Abhishek Garg Jul 16 at 17:58
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Your question is:

Is there any way to explicitly do name mangling (also called name decoration) in a library written in c(or cpp).I want all the symbols of my shared library to have their names mangled.

However, I suspect that you're using the term name mangling inappropriately. Name mangling has nothing to do with library release version. If you mean to version each object exported in your library, then there are plenty of questions to answer that. Personally, I would use a versioned namespace -- but only because I haven't (yet) been bitten by it. Here's a quick example:

namespace mylibrary {
namespace v1 {
class foo {};
}
using foo = v1::foo;
}

mylibrary::foo f; // mylibrary::v1::foo

...then on a later release...

namespace mylibrary {
namespace v1 {
class foo {};
}
namespace v2 {
class foo;
}
using foo = v2::foo;
}
mylibrary::foo newer_f; // mylibrary::v2::foo
mylibrary::v1::foo older_f;

There are of course many permutations you could have. And there are a lot of caveats, especially if you have templated code or make use of ADL. If you release version 1 of the library with one definition of class foo but then version 2 has a different definition, then the two libraries will not be compatible! That's rather the whole point though.

If however I am incorrect and you truly do want to enforce C++ name mangling in your C++ library (which is odd, because it should be done by default), then the answer is twofold. First, take a look at some related questions:

The reading is related but not causal. The related questions are answering your question in reverse.

Many operating systems are written in C and that is typically why you'd see extern "C" when including system headers. It's also why you sometimes see the linker complaining about missing functions when you try to use things declared in a header whose library was compiled with C instead of C++.

So to go in the other direction (in your direction): in your header file, you can declare your exports to be extern "C++". That tells the compiler to specifically use mangled names when importing or exporting the object.

Using extern "C++" won't by itself be your magic trick. There are some GCC options which control some of the more specific functionality about name mangling. So, secondly, take a look at those. The (external link) to the GCC manual page is here: https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/C_002b_002b-Dialect-Options.html

Any option which mentions ABI, such as -fabi, might impact you. "-fabi" flags relate to "Application Binary Interface". You might want to learn more about these terms too. What is an application binary interface has some excellent answers describing what an ABI is and how you can start to reason about them. "-Wabi" will tell GCC to emit warnings when it detects potential ABI conflicts. But, like all things C++, it's not foolproof. I would not be surprised if there are name mangling issues which might not be detected by it. That's particularly true if you ever mix heterogenous compiler vendors or versions.

Importantly: mixing ABIs is likely going to be a big headache. I'd be very concerned about ABI incompatibilities being forced together and causing very difficult-to-debug undefined behaviors!

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