51

Is there a way to change the status bar to white for a SwiftUI view?

I'm probably missing something simple, but I can't seem to find a way to change the status bar to white in SwiftUI. So far I just see .statusBar(hidden: Bool).

8
  • 1
    Do you mean the status bar background or the status bar text? – graycampbell Jul 17 '19 at 0:44
  • Status bar text, switching to the light style – keegan3d Jul 17 '19 at 0:54
  • Are you trying to change it for the whole app or just one view? – graycampbell Jul 17 '19 at 0:55
  • 1
    Whole app would be fine, but would be nice to know how to change just one view – keegan3d Jul 17 '19 at 1:56
  • 2
    See this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/17678881/… – Vlad Lego Jul 23 '19 at 11:17

17 Answers 17

36

As in the comments linked to I edited this question here

But to answer this question and help people find the answer directly:

Swift 5 and SwiftUI

For SwiftUI create a new swift file called HostingController.swift

import SwiftUI

class HostingController<ContentView>: UIHostingController<ContentView> where ContentView : View {
    override var preferredStatusBarStyle: UIStatusBarStyle {
        return .lightContent
    }
}

Then change the following lines of code in the SceneDelegate.swift

window.rootViewController = UIHostingController(rootView: ContentView())

to

window.rootViewController = HostingController(rootView: ContentView())
9
  • 5
    Anyway to change the status bar color from SwiftUI? I.e. if you show a modal that needs a different status bar? – keegan3d Aug 22 '19 at 1:55
  • With this I imagine you need to bear in mind that dark mode may need to affect this value – CMash Oct 16 '19 at 8:53
  • 7
    This does not workin if you have environment objects. – Richard Witherspoon Nov 19 '19 at 3:18
  • 1
    @RichardWitherspoon I've posted a new answer with a working solutions for environment objects – GRosay Jan 23 '20 at 9:48
  • 5
    What about the new SwiftUI life cycle? – Alex Giatrakis Dec 8 '20 at 9:51
30

The status bar text/tint/foreground color can be set to white by setting the View's .dark or .light mode color scheme using .preferredColorScheme(_ colorScheme: ColorScheme?).

The first view in your hierarchy that uses this method will take precedence.

For example:

var body: some View {
  ZStack { ... }
  .preferredColorScheme(.dark) // white tint on status bar
}
var body: some View {
  ZStack { ... }
  .preferredColorScheme(.light) // black tint on status bar
}
3
  • 1
    Thanks. This is the actual SwiftUI way. – Fahim Rahman Jul 12 '20 at 7:39
  • 16
    I believe this will change the color scheme entirely, not just the status bar text color. If your app uses dark theme then it's not a viable solution – Emil Aug 14 '20 at 13:03
  • 2
    Good answer, but it can lead to more hassle because this will also change color schemes of Lists and other objects inside that Stack. Changing only the UIStatusBar will avoid this and be less code technically. – DaWiseguy Aug 20 '20 at 23:53
19

In info.plist, you can simply set

  • "Status bar style" to "Light Content"
  • "View controller-based status bar appearance" to NO

No need to change anything into your code...

2
  • Doesn't seem to do anything with a SwiftUI app. – boxed Jul 6 '20 at 5:59
  • 1
    @boxed make sure to set "UIViewControllerBasedStatusBarAppearance" to "NO" as well, otherwise SwiftUI may override. – Matt Gallagher Feb 11 at 4:19
16

SwiftUI

Create a hosting controller, DarkHostingController and set the preferredStatusBarStyle on it:

class DarkHostingController<ContentView> : UIHostingController<ContentView> where ContentView : View {
    override dynamic open var preferredStatusBarStyle: UIStatusBarStyle {
        .lightContent
    }
}

and wrap in SceneDelegate:

window.rootViewController = DarkHostingController(rootView: ContentView())
5
  • 2
    This works for changing the text color from black to white but how can I change the background color of the status bar? – MobileMon Aug 27 '19 at 18:23
  • 4
    @MobileMon you use .edgesIgnoringSafeArea(.top) to allow your background to go all the way up to the top and you can set that color. You put that directly on the View. – Sverrisson Aug 27 '19 at 18:59
  • What is "Model()"? You don't have it defined. – Richard Witherspoon Nov 19 '19 at 3:12
  • @RichardWitherspoon Model is my data model object and you don't need it for this solution. I will delete it, to prevent confusion. – Sverrisson Nov 19 '19 at 17:32
  • I like the use of generics to disassociate the Controller from a specific type (unlike it is done in the most voted answer), however, what would be the point of using '@objc' and 'dynamic open' in this specific use case? – Repose Jan 16 '20 at 17:04
15

The existing answers cover the case where you want to just change the status bar color once (ex. use light content throughout your app), but if you want to do it programmatically then preference keys are a way to accomplish that.

The full example can be found below, but here is a description of what we're going to do:

  • Define a struct conforming to PreferenceKey, this will be used by Views to set their preferred status bar style
  • Create a subclass of UIHostingController that can detect preference changes and bridge them to the relevant UIKit code
  • Add an extension View to get an API that almost looks official

Preference Key Conformance

struct StatusBarStyleKey: PreferenceKey {
  static var defaultValue: UIStatusBarStyle = .default
  
  static func reduce(value: inout UIStatusBarStyle, nextValue: () -> UIStatusBarStyle) {
    value = nextValue()
  }
}

UIHostingController Subclass

class HostingController: UIHostingController<AnyView> {
  var statusBarStyle = UIStatusBarStyle.default

  //UIKit seems to observe changes on this, perhaps with KVO?
  //In any case, I found changing `statusBarStyle` was sufficient
  //and no other method calls were needed to force the status bar to update
  override var preferredStatusBarStyle: UIStatusBarStyle {
    statusBarStyle
  }

  init<T: View>(wrappedView: T) {
// This observer is necessary to break a dependency cycle - without it 
// onPreferenceChange would need to use self but self can't be used until 
// super.init is called, which can't be done until after onPreferenceChange is set up etc.
    let observer = Observer()

    let observedView = AnyView(wrappedView.onPreferenceChange(StatusBarStyleKey.self) { style in
      observer.value?.statusBarStyle = style
    })

    super.init(rootView: observedView)
    observer.value = self
  }

  private class Observer {
    weak var value: HostingController?
    init() {}
  }

  @available(*, unavailable) required init?(coder aDecoder: NSCoder) {
    // We aren't using storyboards, so this is unnecessary
    fatalError("Unavailable")
  }
}

View Extension

extension View {
  func statusBar(style: UIStatusBarStyle) -> some View {
    preference(key: StatusBarStyleKey.self, value: style)
  }
}

Usage

First, in your SceneDelegate you'll need to replace UIHostingController with your subclass:

//Previously: window.rootViewController = UIHostingController(rootView: rootView)
window.rootViewController = HostingController(wrappedView: rootView)

Any views can now use your extension to specify their preference:

VStack {
   Text("Something")
}.statusBar(style: .lightContent)

Notes

The solution of using a HostingController subclass to observe preference key changes was suggested in this answer to another question - I had previously used @EnvironmentObject which had a lot of downsides, preference keys seem much more suited to this problem.

Is this the right solution to this issue? I'm not sure. There are likely edge cases that this doesn't handle, for instance I haven't thoroughly tested to see what view gets priority if multiple views in the hierarchy specify a preference key. In my own usage, I have two mutually exclusive views that specify their preferred status bar style, so I haven't had to deal with this. So you may need to modify this to suit your needs (ex. maybe use a tuple to specify both a style and a priority, then have your HostingController check it's previous priority before overriding).

6
  • This solution is most valuable when you have a different style of bar status on each next screen. – A.Kant Dec 27 '20 at 16:04
  • You need to tell appkit the value has changed let observedView = AnyView(rootView.onPreferenceChange(StatusBarStyleKey.self) { style in observer.value?.statusBarStyle = style observer.value?.setNeedsStatusBarAppearanceUpdate() }) – Klajd Deda Dec 29 '20 at 19:23
  • @KlajdDeda in my experiments that wasn't needed, I think AppKit is using some KVO to determine a change has been made. That said, I have since found some limitations with the approach described here - specifically preferences in SwiftUI are applied from shallowest to deepest view, with the preferences of shallower views taking higher priority. So if your root view prefers light content, and a deeper view prefers dark content, the root view will "win". I don't know of a good way to work around this. – Arkcann Dec 30 '20 at 15:21
  • @Arkcann Thanks your answer helped me. I think you can define custom logic in PreferenceKey.reduce method to make it how ever you want. You can append values to an array and use only first item (or last) if you want to deeper values to take precedence. – Orkhan Alikhanov Jan 22 at 16:50
  • 1
    This works for apps still using the UIKit app lifecycle. Do you have a solution for apps using the new SwiftUI App main? – Edward Mar 15 at 14:16
12

Just add this to info.plist

<key>UIStatusBarStyle</key>
<string>UIStatusBarStyleLightContent</string>
<key>UIViewControllerBasedStatusBarAppearance</key>
<false/>

tested on IOS 14, xcode 12

1
8

This solution works for apps using the new SwiftUI Lifecycle:

I needed to change the status bar text dynamically and couldn't access window.rootViewController because SceneDelegate doesn't exist for the SwiftUI Lifecycle.

I finally found this easy solution by Xavier Donnellon: https://github.com/xavierdonnellon/swiftui-statusbarstyle

Copy the StatusBarController.swift file into your project and wrap your main view into a RootView:

@main
struct ProjectApp: App {     
    var body: some Scene {
        WindowGroup {
            //wrap main view in RootView
            RootView {
                //Put the view you want your app to present here
                ContentView()
                    //add necessary environment objects here 
            }
        }
    }
}

Then you can change the status bar text color by using the .statusBarStyle(.darkContent) or .statusBarStyle(.lightContent) view modifiers, or by calling e.g. UIApplication.setStatusBarStyle(.lightContent) directly.

Don't forget to set "View controller-based status bar appearance" to "YES" in Info.plist.

1
  • 2
    This is the only thing that worked for me on a SwiftUI Lifecycle app. Thanks for sharing! – Ruben Martinez Jr. Mar 22 at 14:26
6

Create a new class called HostingController:

import SwiftUI

final class HostingController<T: View>: UIHostingController<T> {
    override var preferredStatusBarStyle: UIStatusBarStyle {
        .lightContent
    }
}

In your SceneDelegate.swift, replace all occurrences of UIHostingController with HostingController.

6

Update: It looks like Hannes Sverrisson's answer above is the closest, but our answers are slightly different.

The above answers with the UIHostingController subclass, as written, don't work in XCode 11.3.1.

The following did work for me, for the subclass (which handles the ContentView environment settings as well):

import SwiftUI

class HostingController<Content>: UIHostingController<Content> where Content : View {
    override var preferredStatusBarStyle: UIStatusBarStyle {
        return .lightContent
    }
}

Then in SceneDelegate.swift, changing the window.rootViewController setting as such does indeed work:

window.rootViewController = HostingController(rootView: contentView)
0
5

This is what worked for me. Add these lines to your info.plist file. You'll need to toggle the top setting (View controller-based status bar appearance) to determine what you're looking for.

enter image description here

1
  • 1
    Wow, this actually worked and is less code and works with the new SwiftUI life cycle. This is the way! – Burgler-dev Feb 20 at 9:39
4

In the case you use environmentObject you can use the solution proposed in this answer.

Create a new file and paste the following code

import SwiftUI

class HostingController: UIHostingController<AnyView> {
   override var preferredStatusBarStyle: UIStatusBarStyle {
      return .lightContent
   }
}

The difference here is that we use AnyView instead of ContentView, which allows us to replace this:

window.rootViewController = UIHostingController(rootView:contentView.environmentObject(settings))

by this:

window.rootViewController = HostingController(rootView: AnyView(contentView.environmentObject(settings)))
2
  • Hows the performance? I've seen mentions that using AnyView negatively impacts performance. – Richard Witherspoon Jan 23 '20 at 17:51
  • 2
    My app isn’t heavy so I didn’t noticed any difference, but I can’t confirm for heavier apps – GRosay Jan 23 '20 at 18:55
3

Answer from @Dan Sandland worked for me, but in my case it was required keep the interface in .light mode

ZStack {
    Rectangle()...
    
    VStack(spacing: 0) {
        ...
    }.colorScheme(.light)
}
.preferredColorScheme(.dark)
1

Above solution works for the status bar style. If you want apply a background color to the status bar then you need to use a VStack that ignores top save area.

    GeometryReader{geometry in
        VStack{
            Rectangle().frame(width: geometry.size.width, height: 20, alignment: .center).foregroundColor(.red)
            Spacer()
            Your content view goes here
        }
        .frame(width: geometry.size.width, height: geometry.size.height)
    }.edgesIgnoringSafeArea(.top)

You can use actual status bar height instead of fixed 20. Please refer to the link below to get the status bar height. Status bar height in Swift

0

I am using something like this

extension UIApplication {

    enum ColorMode {
        case dark, light
    }

    class func setStatusBarTextColor(_ mode: ColorMode) {
        if #available(iOS 13.0, *) {
            var style: UIUserInterfaceStyle
            switch mode {
            case .dark:
                style = .dark
            default:
                style = .light
            }
            if let window = Self.activeSceneDelegate?.window as? UIWindow {
                window.overrideUserInterfaceStyle = style
                window.setNeedsDisplay()
            }
        }
    }

    class var activeSceneDelegate: UIWindowSceneDelegate? {
        (Self.activeScene)?.delegate as? UIWindowSceneDelegate
    }
}
1
  • Error: Type 'Self' has no member 'activeScene'. Please also share your UIApplication extension with us. thx. – Peter Kreinz Sep 11 '20 at 12:18
0

Create a new swift file called HostingController.swift or just add this class on your existing swift file

class HostingController: UIHostingController<ContentView> {
    override var preferredStatusBarStyle: UIStatusBarStyle {
        return .darkContent //or .lightContent

    }
}

Then change the line of code in the SceneDelegate.swift

window.rootViewController = UIHostingController(rootView: contentView)

to

window.rootViewController = HostingController(rootView: contentView)
1
  • 1
    How is this different than the answers from a year ago? – Orkhan Alikhanov Jan 22 at 21:21
0

Arkcann's answer was great but unfortunately was not working for me because the StatusBarStyleKey.defaultValue was taking the precedence (I wonder how he managed it work). I made it Optional and override previously set value only if it was explicitly set. (I was testing on a real device on iOS 14.3)

struct StatusBarStyleKey: PreferenceKey {
  static func reduce(value: inout UIStatusBarStyle?, nextValue: () -> UIStatusBarStyle?) {
    guard let v = nextValue() else {
      return
    }
    
    value = v
  }
}

extension View {
  func statusBar(style: UIStatusBarStyle?) -> some View {
    return preference(key: StatusBarStyleKey.self, value: style)
  }
}

I also took a bit different approach in creating the HostingController, I stored the status bar style globally.

private var appStatusBarStyle: UIStatusBarStyle?

private class HostingController<ContentView: View>: UIHostingController<ContentView> {
  override var preferredStatusBarStyle: UIStatusBarStyle {
    return appStatusBarStyle ?? .default
  }
}


func createHostingController<T: View>(rootView :T) -> UIViewController {
  let view = rootView.onPreferenceChange(StatusBarStyleKey.self) {
    appStatusBarStyle = $0
  }
  
  return HostingController(rootView: view)
}

Usage:

window.rootViewController = createHostingController(rootView: MyApp())
0

Out of all the proposed solutions, the less intrusive, most straightforward, and, actually, the only working for us was the one proposed by Michał Ziobro: https://stackoverflow.com/a/60188583/944839

In our app, we need to present a screen as a sheet with a dark Status Bar. Neither of the simple solutions (like setting preferredColorScheme) did work for us. However, manually forcing the app color scheme in onAppear of the screen presented as a sheet and restoring it back in onDisappear did the trick.

Here is the complete extension code:

import SwiftUI
import UIKit

extension ColorScheme {
    var interfaceStyle: UIUserInterfaceStyle {
        switch self {
        case .dark: return .dark
        case .light: return .light
        @unknown default: return .light
        }
    }
}

extension SceneDelegate {
    static var current: Self? {
        let windowScene = UIApplication.shared.connectedScenes.first as? UIWindowScene
        return windowScene?.delegate as? Self
    }
}

extension UIApplication {
    static func setColorScheme(_ colorScheme: ColorScheme) {
        if let window = SceneDelegate.current?.window {
            window.overrideUserInterfaceStyle = colorScheme.interfaceStyle
            window.setNeedsDisplay()
        }
    }
}

P.S. In order for the screen itself to still use light color scheme, we apply colorScheme(.light) modifier to the content of a body.

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