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What's the difference between INNER JOIN, LEFT JOIN, RIGHT JOIN and FULL JOIN in MySQL?

marked as duplicate by Martin Smith mysql May 24 '15 at 15:31

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Reading this original article on The Code Project will help you a lot: Visual Representation of SQL Joins.

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Also check this post: SQL SERVER – Better Performance – LEFT JOIN or NOT IN?.

Find original one at: Difference between JOIN and OUTER JOIN in MySQL.

  • 160
    These pictures don't do it for me. Why is the top right picture not simply SELECT * FROM TableA;? Why is the top left picture not simply SELECT * FROM TableB;? Why is the top middle picture not SELECT * FROM A INTERSECT SELECT * FROM B ? etc – onedaywhen Sep 9 '11 at 10:41
  • 86
    I have a problem with the whole concept: those are visual representations of union, intersect, except, etc. They have no visual representation of projection therefore cannot be joins. I think it will confuse more than benefit when the context is joins. – onedaywhen Sep 9 '11 at 11:02
  • 147
    Have to disagree. I think these are good visualizations. At a glance you can see what will be selected from the two tables when using a certain join. "onedaywhen" commented "why not just say select * from table a".... well because it's a join and needs two tables lol. – Induster Jul 12 '12 at 18:12
  • 20
    SQL is a language that reads left to right- yes? :) – bjedrzejewski Dec 16 '13 at 10:13
  • 15
    This diagram has one major problem, which is that it completely ignores the difference between semi-joins and joins. That is: select a.* from a inner join b on a.id = b.id vs. select a.* from a where id in (select id from b). That is because SQL joins are NOT the intersection of two sets- the join can be one->one, one->many, or many->many. So it's actually impossible to represent with a Venn diagram: all this diagram does is show you "what portion of the table will be involved in the join." In which case select a.* from a cross join b should have the same diagram as full outer join. – ubanerjea Oct 30 '14 at 18:46

INNER JOIN gets all records that are common between both tables based on the foreign key

LEFT JOIN gets all records from the LEFT linked table but if you have selected some columns from the RIGHT table, if there is no related records, these columns will contain NULL

RIGHT JOIN is like the above but gets all records in the RIGHT table

FULL JOIN gets all records from both tables and puts NULL in the columns where related records do not exist in the opposite table

  • 12
    That's technically not correct: "INNER JOIN gets all records from one table that have some related entry in a second table" - INNER JOIN doesn't just return records from one table. – nietaki Jul 8 '15 at 21:42
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    @nietaki what is the difference between " "INNER JOIN gets all records from one table that have some related entry in a second table"" AND "INNER JOIN gets all records that are common between both tables" ? Notice that he never said it just returns records from one table. – barlop Sep 22 '17 at 11:27
  • @barlop OK I see commenter Nietaki thinks that in the first statement the claim was that it just returns records from one table.. The latter statement is far more ambiguous though and doesn't explain what inner join does. So it's also wrong. – barlop Oct 1 '17 at 20:33
  • When you say "INNER JOIN gets all records that are common between both tables" It suggests that there is some test to see if two records are identical. When actually it's just a condition e.g. / almost always, testing a field of them for equality. The rest of the record need not be identical and typically wouldn't be 'cos if they were identical there'd be no advantage to join them in the first place. It joins corresponding records.. – barlop Oct 1 '17 at 20:37
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    What's also not stated here is what happens when you have multiple corresponding records.. records with identical values in that field.. in table A or table B or tables A and B. – barlop Oct 1 '17 at 20:37

An SQL JOIN clause is used to combine rows from two or more tables, based on a common field between them.

There are different types of joins available in SQL:

INNER JOIN: returns rows when there is a match in both tables.

LEFT JOIN: returns all rows from the left table, even if there are no matches in the right table.

RIGHT JOIN: returns all rows from the right table, even if there are no matches in the left table.

FULL JOIN: It combines the results of both left and right outer joins.

The joined table will contain all records from both the tables and fill in NULLs for missing matches on either side.

SELF JOIN: is used to join a table to itself as if the table were two tables, temporarily renaming at least one table in the SQL statement.

CARTESIAN JOIN: returns the Cartesian product of the sets of records from the two or more joined tables.

WE can take each first four joins in Details :

We have two tables with the following values.

TableA

id  firstName                  lastName
.......................................
1   arun                        prasanth                 
2   ann                         antony                   
3   sruthy                      abc                      
6   new                         abc                                           

TableB

id2 age Place
................
1   24  kerala
2   24  usa
3   25  ekm
5   24  chennai

....................................................................

INNER JOIN

Note :it gives the intersection of the two tables, i.e. rows they have common in TableA and TableB

Syntax

SELECT table1.column1, table2.column2...
  FROM table1
 INNER JOIN table2
    ON table1.common_field = table2.common_field;

Apply it in our sample table :

SELECT TableA.firstName,TableA.lastName,TableB.age,TableB.Place
  FROM TableA
 INNER JOIN TableB
    ON TableA.id = TableB.id2;

Result Will Be

firstName       lastName       age  Place
..............................................
arun            prasanth        24  kerala
ann             antony          24  usa
sruthy          abc             25  ekm

LEFT JOIN

Note : will give all selected rows in TableA, plus any common selected rows in TableB.

Syntax

SELECT table1.column1, table2.column2...
  FROM table1
  LEFT JOIN table2
    ON table1.common_field = table2.common_field;

Apply it in our sample table :

SELECT TableA.firstName,TableA.lastName,TableB.age,TableB.Place
  FROM TableA
  LEFT JOIN TableB
    ON TableA.id = TableB.id2;

Result

firstName                   lastName                    age   Place
...............................................................................
arun                        prasanth                    24    kerala
ann                         antony                      24    usa
sruthy                      abc                         25    ekm
new                         abc                         NULL  NULL

RIGHT JOIN

Note : will give all selected rows in TableB, plus any common selected rows in TableA.

Syntax

SELECT table1.column1, table2.column2...
  FROM table1
 RIGHT JOIN table2
    ON table1.common_field = table2.common_field;

Apply it in our sample table :

SELECT TableA.firstName,TableA.lastName,TableB.age,TableB.Place
  FROM TableA
 RIGHT JOIN TableB
    ON TableA.id = TableB.id2;

Result

firstName                   lastName                    age     Place
...............................................................................
arun                        prasanth                    24     kerala
ann                         antony                      24     usa
sruthy                      abc                         25     ekm
NULL                        NULL                        24     chennai

FULL JOIN

Note :It will return all selected values from both tables.

Syntax

SELECT table1.column1, table2.column2...
  FROM table1
  FULL JOIN table2
    ON table1.common_field = table2.common_field;

Apply it in our sample table :

SELECT TableA.firstName,TableA.lastName,TableB.age,TableB.Place
  FROM TableA
  FULL JOIN TableB
    ON TableA.id = TableB.id2;

Result

firstName                   lastName                    age    Place
...............................................................................
arun                        prasanth                    24    kerala
ann                         antony                      24    usa
sruthy                      abc                         25    ekm
new                         abc                         NULL  NULL
NULL                        NULL                        24    chennai

Interesting Fact

For INNER joins the order doesn't matter

For (LEFT, RIGHT or FULL) OUTER joins,the order matter

Better to go check this Link it will give you interesting details about join order

protected by Tab Alleman May 17 at 13:46

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