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I am working on a project with IR receiver and transmitter but I am having a problem with the receiver (the receiver model: TSOP1756). From the protocol, it works with 56khz but here is the problem, can I make a change in code to decode IR signals from different/multi-frequency, like a TV remote with 38khz and AC remote with 40khz. I am using the IRremote library for my project.

I had tried with different IR receiver models but none of them work with different frequency.

#include <IRremote.h>

int RECV_PIN = 11;

IRrecv irrecv(RECV_PIN);

decode_results results;

void setup()
{
  Serial.begin(9600);
  // In case the interrupt driver crashes on setup, give a clue
  // to the user what's going on.
  Serial.println("Enabling IRin");
  irrecv.enableIRIn(); // Start the receiver
  Serial.println("Enabled IRin");
}

void loop() {
  if (irrecv.decode(&results)) {
    Serial.println(results.value, HEX);
    irrecv.resume(); // Receive the next value
  }
  delay(100);
}

I expect to receive HEX codes but the instant I receive FFFFFFFF when I send signals with different frequency.

I would appreciate if anyone helps me

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You understand wrong how IR transmission works.

For the receiver to distinguish the control signal from background infrared noise, the signal is modulated with higher frequency. I.e. it is not a continuous IR-light, it is series of short flashes. The distance between series encodes zeroes and ones, but the flashes itself come with predefined frequency. In your example it is 56kHz.

The receiver has built-in circuit, which filter out the background noise, and detects when the flashes on particular frequency present, and output logical level to it's out pin. Its schematic designed to detect only one particular frequency. For example TSOP1736 - 36kHz, TSOP1740 - 40kHz, TSOP1756 - 56 kHz.

It has only output and do not receive any control logic from the MCU.

So, the answer is NO: you cannot change the modulation frequency from the software. You have to replace the receiver by another model.

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