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I am iterating using iterator over a stream, like this:

Iterator<A> it = myAs.stream().filter(a -> a.isOk()).iterator();

while (it.hasNext()) {
    A a = it.next();
    a.update();
}

In my case, it is possible that by updating the A at the beginning of myAs, I impact the .isOk() condition on later A in the list.

Is it guaranteed that the filtering condition a -> a.isOk() on the ith element of the stream is evaluated after the iteration of the 0...i-1 elements of the stream?

In other words, is this code equivalent to:

Iterator<A> it = myAs.stream().iterator();

while (it.hasNext()) {
    A a = it.next();
    if (a.isOk()) {
        a.update();
    }
}
  • are you saying that once you acquire the myAs.stream() and do something with that, somewhere else someone might update some contents of myAs as-well? – Eugene Jul 17 at 14:05
  • There is no such guaranty, but why do you expect performing a.update() to have an effect on the result of a.isOk() of a different a? – Holger Jul 17 at 14:06
  • @Eugene No, I am only considering that by doing a.update() in the loop on, e.g., the 2nd a, this can impact the a.isOk() on a later a. – Holt Jul 17 at 14:06
  • @Holger Because the as can be linked in some way, e.g., the second a can hold a reference to the first a and use it in isOk(). – Holt Jul 17 at 14:08
  • 1
    Then, you have interference and shouldn’t use the Stream API for that task. I don’t see the benefit of using the Stream API anyway, when you end up dealing with an Iterator manually. What about for(A a: myAs) if(a.isOk()) a.update();? – Holger Jul 17 at 14:11
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I was curious about this so I devised this to see if I understand the issue. The following modifies an object and it does affect the filter. I may not be understanding the issue though.

   public static void main(String[] args) {
      Foo[] arr = IntStream.range(1, 11).mapToObj(Foo::new).toArray(Foo[]::new);
      Iterator<Foo> it = Arrays.stream(arr).peek(System.out::println).filter(
            a -> a.v % 2 == 0).iterator();

      int count = 0;
      while (it.hasNext()) {
         System.out.println(it.next());
         if (count == 2) {
            arr[5].v = 1000; // not affected
            arr[6].v = 2000; // affected
         }
         count++;
      }
   }

}

class Foo {
   public int v;

   Foo(int v) {
      this.v = v;
   }

   public String toString() {
      return "Foo:" + v;
   }
}
  • You are only counting matching elements, so when count == 2, you just passed arr[5]. Put System.out.println(it.next()); after the if statement, to see the effect. But this doesn’t answer the question whether the exhibited behavior is guaranteed. – Holger Jul 17 at 14:54

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