1

I have two queries that are both very quick (20ms) - when i combine them with a join, i get a 30 second query and the data is wrong... What's wrong?

SELECT
    count(profile.id),
    date(profile.createdAt)
FROM profile
GROUP BY date(profile.createdAt)
ORDER BY date(profile.createdAt) DESC;

and

SELECT
    count(product.id),
    date(product.createdAt)
FROM product
GROUP BY date(product.createdAt)
ORDER BY date(product.createdAt) desc;

Joining them i get a very slow query:

SELECT
    count(profile._id),
    date(profile.createdAt),
    count(product._id),
    date(product.createdAt)
FROM profile
    INNER JOIN product
    ON date(product.createdAt) = date(profile.createdAt)
GROUP BY 
    date(product.createdAt), 
    date(profile.createdAt)
ORDER BY date(product.createdAt) desc;

2 Answers 2

2

The logical error with your current approach is that you are double counting one or both of the counts due to the join. You may try doing the aggregations in separate subqueries, and then join those subqueries:

SELECT
    t1.createdAt,
    COALESCE(t1.profile_cnt, 0) AS profile_cnt,
    COALESCE(t2.product_cnt, 0) AS product_cnt
FROM
(
    SELECT DATE(createdAt) AS createdAt, COUNT(id) AS profile_cnt
    FROM profile
    GROUP BY DATE(createdAt)
) t1
INNER JOIN
(
    SELECT DATE(createdAt) AS createdAt, COUNT(id) AS product_cnt
    FROM product
    GROUP BY DATE(createdAt)
) t2
    ON t1.createdAt = t2.createdAt;

If the two tables don't both contain the same dates, then the above query might drop certain dates. To avoid this, we could join with a calendar table which includes all dates we want to appear in the output.

Regarding performance, you are doing a join of two aggregation queries, so it is not expected to be that performant. Also, calling DATE to cast createdAt to a pure date is expensive, and maybe could be avoided by maintaining a dedicated date column.

1
  • thank you! I changed the GROUP BY statements to GROUP BY DATE(createdAt), and then it worked! Also returning in 21 ms. Thank you!
    – fotoflo
    Jul 18, 2019 at 2:23
0

I think the problem is that you are joining on the result of the date function, which is likely doing a lot under the hood. That function has to execute for every record in each table.

If you can, join with the primary keys/foreign keys of the tables to take advantage of indexes.

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