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It appears that as.character() of a number is still a number, which I find counter intuitive. Consider this example:

1 > "2"
[1] FALSE
2 > "1"
[1] TRUE

Even if I try to use as.character() or paste()

as.character(2)
[1] "2"
as.character(2) > 1
[1] TRUE
as.character(2) < 1
[1] FALSE

Why is that? Can't I have R return an error when I am comparing numbers with strings?

  • as.character represents real and complex numbers to 15 significant digits <== From the docs. Maybe use an expression instead? What is your ultimate goal? – NelsonGon Jul 18 at 8:08
  • @NelsonGon this behavior caused some problem in a lengthy function. I was not expecting comparison between numbers and characters would throw an error, but didn't. – MSD Jul 18 at 8:15
  • 1
    This probably answers the question stackoverflow.com/questions/14932015/why-true-true-is-true-in-r The important part is If the two arguments are atomic vectors of different types, one is coerced to the type of the other, the (decreasing) order of precedence being character, complex, numeric, integer, logical and raw. – Ronak Shah Jul 18 at 8:17
  • 2
    You might want to check out "2" > 11. The reason why this works as it does is basically the same as why paste0("A", 1) or 1L + 0.1 works. R changes the types when needed. – Roland Jul 18 at 8:34
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    @NelsonGon as.character of course creates characters. What than happens is that > coerces the number to character and these characters are compared according to the collating sequence as the documentation explains. – Roland Jul 18 at 9:01
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The documentation of ?Comparison states that

If the two arguments are atomic vectors of different types, one is coerced to the type of the other, the (decreasing) order of precedence being character, complex, numeric, integer, logical and raw.

So in your case the number is automatically coerced to string and the comparison is made based on the respective collation.

In order to prevent it, the only option I know of is to manually compare the class first.

3

As explained in the comments the problem is that the numeric 1 is coerced to character. The operation < still works for characters. A character is smaller than another if it comes first in alphabetical order.

> "a" < "b"
[1] TRUE
> "z" < "b"
[1] FALSE

So in your case as.character(2) > 1 is transformed to as.character(2) > as.character(1) and because of the "alphabetical" order of numbers TRUEis returned.

To prevent this you would have to check for the class of an object manually.

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