3

I am having some problems when testing an oauth2 resource server using @WebMvcTest and the POST HTTP method.

I always receive a 403 status code when I don't send the csrf token, even though the token is not required when I am using a bearer token.

Here is the POST method that I want to test.

@PostMapping("/message")
public String createMessage(@RequestBody String message) {
    return String.format("Message was created. Content: %s", message);
}

Here is my security config:

http.authorizeRequests(authorizeRequests -> authorizeRequests       
   .antMatchers("/message/**")
   .hasAuthority("SCOPE_message:read")
   .anyRequest().authenticated()
).oauth2ResourceServer(oauth2ResourceServer ->               
    oauth2ResourceServer
    .jwt(withDefaults())
);

I am following the tests provided in the samples of spring-security.

The following test was supposed to pass but it fails because the csrf token is not sent in the request.

mockMvc.perform(post("/message").content("Hello message")
    .with(jwt(jwt -> jwt.claim("scope", "message:read")))
    .andExpect(status().isOk())
    .andExpect(content().string(is("Message was created. Content: Hello message")));

When I add the csrf token to the request, the test passes:

mockMvc.perform(post("/message").content("Hello message")
    .with(jwt(jwt -> jwt.claim("scope", "message:read")))
    .with(csrf()))
    .andExpect(status().isOk())
    .andExpect(content().string(is("Message was created. Content: Hello message")));

When I run the application, there is no need to send a csrf token in the POST request.

I have forked the Spring Security GitHub repository and the project with this failing test is available at this link.

Is there a way for me to configure my tests so I don't need to send the csrf token in the POST request?

  • You said "When I run the application, there is no need to send a csrf token in the POST request.", how did you try this? A CSRF token is required for all POST requests unless explicitly disabled using .csrf(csrf -> csrf.disable()) in your security configuration. The sample project tests are all for GET requests, so they don't require a CSRF token. – Eleftheria Stein-Kousathana Jul 19 '19 at 9:35
  • Actually, the CSRF token is not required in runtime. When I run the following command: curl -v -H "Authorization: Bearer $TOKEN" -d "my message" -X POST localhost:8080/message I receive a 200 status. As far as I understand, the CSRF filter only checks the token if there is no Bearer token. – henriquels Jul 19 '19 at 13:56
  • My mistake, you are correct that the CSRF token is not needed if there is a Bearer token. The issue with the test that only includes the jwt post processor is that while this creates the security context containing the JWT, it does not create a Bearer token in the request (which is what the CSRF filter is looking for). – Eleftheria Stein-Kousathana Jul 19 '19 at 16:17
4

In order for the CSRF filter to detect that you are using a JWT token, you will need to include the JWT token in your request as an Authorization header, or as a request parameter.
The tests that you have mentioned have a mock JwtDecoder, which means you can use any string as your token and mock the decoded value.
Your test would then become:

Jwt jwt = Jwt.withTokenValue("token")
        .header("alg", "none")
        .claim("scope", "message:read")
        .build();
when(jwtDecoder.decode(anyString())).thenReturn(jwt);
mockMvc.perform(post("/message")
        .content("Hello message")
        .header("Authorization", "Bearer " + jwt.getTokenValue()))
        .andExpect(status().isOk())
        .andExpect(content().string(is("Message was created. Content: Hello message")));

If you are not mocking the JwtDecoder then you would need to retrieve a valid bearer token and pass that in the Authorization header.

  • it worked, thanks! But wouldn't it be possible to use the JwtRequestPostProcessor in the POST request? The code for testing the GET method is cleaner. – henriquels Jul 19 '19 at 17:16
  • @henriquels The JwtRequestPostProcessor doesn't add the header that is needed by the CSRF filter. You could write a custom post processor, similar to this one. – Eleftheria Stein-Kousathana Jul 21 '19 at 14:13

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.