4

I am looking for an iterative version of graph post-order traversal in java. I have written the code to do iterative DFS. How could I modify the code so that the following code can print out the path of iterative post-order DFS traversal? For example, the output of the following graph should be FCBEDA(G).

graph image

public void DFS(int sourceVertex) {
     Stack<Integer> stack = new Stack<>();
     stack.push(sourceVertex);
     while (!stack.isEmpty()) {
          int v = stack.pop();
          if (!marked[v]) {
               marked[v] = true;
               for (int w : v.adj) {
                    stack.push(w);
               }
          }
     }
}
4
  • In the example, the sourceVertex is A
    – hck007
    Jul 19 '19 at 7:13
  • Print immediately after the pop operation. Note that to produce a specific node order you need to have control over the adjacency lists, as in general, the order of the nodes therein determines the structure of the DFS tree ( in your example: FCBDEAG would be just as valid a result as the one you gave ).
    – collapsar
    Jul 19 '19 at 8:12
  • @ collapsar Thanks. The output is preorder not post-order
    – hck007
    Jul 19 '19 at 8:32
  • Yep, sorry, printing should be the last line of the while loop.
    – collapsar
    Jul 19 '19 at 8:52
6

The approach where you should go as deep as possible and then put it in the postorder list is:

public LinkedList<Integer> postorder(Digraph digraph, int source) {

    Stack<Integer> stack = new Stack<>();
    LinkedList<Integer> postorder = new LinkedList<>();

    visited[source] = true;           // visited = new boolean[V], # of vertices
    stack.push(source);

    while (!stack.isEmpty()) {

        int cur = stack.peek();       // don't pop(), just peek(), we will pop() it 
        boolean tail = true;          // only if this vertex is tail
        for (Integer v : digraph.adj(cur)) {
            if (visited[v] == false) {
                tail = false;         // found one vertex that can be approached next
                visited[v] = true;    // then vertex cur is not tail yet 
                stack.push(v);
                break;                // one neighbor is found and that is enough, 
                                      // let's examine it in next peek(), others 
            }                         // will be found later
        }                             
        if (tail) {                   // we didn't enter for-loop above, then cur is 
            stack.pop();              // tail, we pop() it and add to postorder list
            postorder.addLast(cur);
        }

    }
    return postorder; 
}

Comments in the code should explain approach.

0

Your graph is a directed graph, you cannot go from F to any other node then, DFS from F return only the F node. In general, the output is different when you use different starting node (and if the graph is directed or not).

Iterative DFS algorithm could be written as:

static List<Node> DFS(Node n) {

    Stack<Node> current = new Stack<>();
    Set<Node> visited = new HashSet<>(); // efficient lookup
    List<Node> result = new ArrayList<>(); // ordered

    current.push(n);

    while(!current.isEmpty()) {
        Node c = current.pop();
        if(!visited.contains(c)) {
            result.add(c);
            visited.add(c);
            // push in reversed order
            IntStream.range(0, c.getChildren().size())
                    .forEach(i -> current.push(c.getChildren().get(c.getChildren().size() - i - 1)));
        }
    }

    return result;
}

You could avoid the visited Set but use result to check if a node was visited take O(n) time when Set take O(1) (amortized).

A complete example:

public static void main(String[] args) {

    Node A = new Node("A");
    Node B = new Node("B");
    Node C = new Node("C");
    Node D = new Node("D");
    Node E = new Node("E");
    Node F = new Node("F");
    Node G = new Node("G");

    A.getChildren().addAll(asList(B, D));
    B.getChildren().addAll(asList(C));
    C.getChildren().addAll(asList(F));
    D.getChildren().addAll(asList(B, F, E));
    E.getChildren().addAll(asList(F));
    //F.getChildren().addAll(asList());
    G.getChildren().addAll(asList(F));

    testDFS(F);
    testDFS(G);
    testDFS(A);

}

static class Node {
    private final String label;
    private final List<Node> children;

    Node(String label) {
        this.label = label;
        this.children = new ArrayList<>();
    }

    public String getLabel() {
        return label;
    }

    public List<Node> getChildren() {
        return children;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        return getLabel().hashCode();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (!(obj instanceof Node))
            return false;
        return getLabel().equals(((Node) obj).getLabel());
    }
}

With output:

From 'F': F
From 'G': G, F
From 'A': A, B, C, F, D, E

If you wish postorder (show first the last visited node) reverse the result list (or add to head, etc.).

To reverse the children order do not reverse before insert:

static List<Node> DFSreversedPostOrder(Node n) {

    Stack<Node> current = new Stack<>();
    Set<Node> visited = new HashSet<>(); // efficient lookup
    List<Node> result = new ArrayList<>(); // ordered

    current.push(n);

    while(!current.isEmpty()) {
        Node c = current.pop();
        if(!visited.contains(c)) {
            result.add(0, c);
            visited.add(c);
            c.getChildren().forEach(current::push);
        }
    }

    return result;
}

Now, you get CBFEDA:

From 'F': F
From 'G': F, G
From 'A': C, B, F, E, D, A

NOTE you example is wrong since after E node you must visit F not B.

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  • 1
    This is post-order traversal. I think you are mentioning pre-order DFS right? In fact, post-order is different from pre-order. In preorder, you explore the root and then to its children. But in postorder, you need to keep exploring until you have a node which does not have any children and then print it out.
    – hck007
    Jul 19 '19 at 7:18
  • @hck007 ah ok, you are right (reverse the result list for that)
    – josejuan
    Jul 19 '19 at 7:25
  • @hck007 see "A postordering is a list of the vertices in the order that they were last visited by the algorithm." en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depth-first_search#Vertex_orderings
    – josejuan
    Jul 19 '19 at 7:48
  • Thanks for help! In this case, the reverse of pre-order is indeed the post order. But the reverse of pre-order is not always equal to the post-order.
    – hck007
    Jul 19 '19 at 7:55
  • Yes @hck007 you want reverse the children too, no problem but I think your example is wrong (I updated the solution).
    – josejuan
    Jul 19 '19 at 7:56

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