I'm using the runtime to run command prompt commands from my Java program. However I'm not aware of how I can get the output the command returns.

Here is my code:

Runtime rt = Runtime.getRuntime();

String[] commands = {"system.exe" , "-send" , argument};

Process proc = rt.exec(commands);

I tried doing System.out.print(proc); but that did not return anything. The execution of that command should return two numbers separated by a semicolon, how could I get this in a variable to print out?

Here is the code I'm using now:

String[] commands = {"system.exe","-get t"};

Process proc = rt.exec(commands);

InputStream stdin = proc.getInputStream();
InputStreamReader isr = new InputStreamReader(stdin);
BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(isr);

String line = null;
System.out.println("<OUTPUT>");

while ( (line = br.readLine()) != null)
     System.out.println(line);

System.out.println("</OUTPUT>");
int exitVal = proc.waitFor();
System.out.println("Process exitValue: " + exitVal);

But I'm not getting anything as my output but when I run that command myself it works fine.

up vote 177 down vote accepted

Here is the way to go:

Runtime rt = Runtime.getRuntime();
String[] commands = {"system.exe","-get t"};
Process proc = rt.exec(commands);

BufferedReader stdInput = new BufferedReader(new 
     InputStreamReader(proc.getInputStream()));

BufferedReader stdError = new BufferedReader(new 
     InputStreamReader(proc.getErrorStream()));

// read the output from the command
System.out.println("Here is the standard output of the command:\n");
String s = null;
while ((s = stdInput.readLine()) != null) {
    System.out.println(s);
}

// read any errors from the attempted command
System.out.println("Here is the standard error of the command (if any):\n");
while ((s = stdError.readLine()) != null) {
    System.out.println(s);
}

Better read the Javadoc for more details here. ProcessBuilder would be good choice to use

  • do you know how to get the output of multiple commands at once, such as "pwd && ls" – Albert Chen Jan 13 '15 at 4:18
  • 4
    @AlbertChen pwd && ls is not just executing a single file, when you do that in a shell it executes both the /bin/pwd and /bin/ls executables. If you want to do stuff like that within java you'll need to do something like {"/bin/bash","-c", "pwd && ls"}. You probably don't have the question anymore but other people might so I thought I might answer it. – 735Tesla Jan 25 '15 at 22:05
  • 1
    I think reading the two streams must be happening concurrently because if ,like in your case, the output of stdStream will fill the buffer, you wont be able to read the error stream.. – Li3ro Oct 16 '17 at 7:38
  • Li3ro is partially right. The program you are listening to has a limited buffer for stdout and stderr output. If you don't listen to them concurrently, one of them will fill up while you are reading the other. The program you are listening to will then block trying to write to the filled buffer, while on the other end your program will block trying to read from a buffer that will never return EOF. You must read from both streams concurrently. – Gili Oct 24 '17 at 2:35

A quicker way is this:

public static String execCmd(String cmd) throws java.io.IOException {
    java.util.Scanner s = new java.util.Scanner(Runtime.getRuntime().exec(cmd).getInputStream()).useDelimiter("\\A");
    return s.hasNext() ? s.next() : "";
}

Which is basically a condensed version of this:

public static String execCmd(String cmd) throws java.io.IOException {
    Process proc = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(cmd);
    java.io.InputStream is = proc.getInputStream();
    java.util.Scanner s = new java.util.Scanner(is).useDelimiter("\\A");
    String val = "";
    if (s.hasNext()) {
        val = s.next();
    }
    else {
        val = "";
    }
    return val;
}

I know this question is old but I am posting this answer because I think this may be quicker.

  • 1
    Thanks for the nice answer. Why is "\\A" the delimiter? – Gottfried Mar 6 '14 at 17:53
  • 1
    I'm don't completely remember what my logic was when I originally wrote this. I have been using this solution for a while but I think it was because \A in a regex means beginning of string and I had to escape the slash. – 735Tesla Mar 6 '14 at 23:43
  • 5
    "\A" is the bell character. "^" is the start of a string in regex, and "$" is the end of a string in regex. This is a character you would expect not to see. The default delimiter is whitespace, according to the Java documentation, so doing this would probably spit out the full result of the command. – Hank Schultz May 12 '15 at 20:32

Besides using ProcessBuilder as suggested Senthil, be sure to read and implement all the recommendations of When Runtime.exec() won't.

  • That snippet does not seem to be consuming the standard error stream (as recommended in the linked article). It is also not using a ProcessBuilder as now recommended twice. Using a ProcessBuilder, it is possible to merge the output & error streams to make it easier to consume both at once. – Andrew Thompson Apr 19 '11 at 5:42

@Senthil and @Arend answer (https://stackoverflow.com/a/5711150/2268559) mentioned ProcessBuilder. Here is the example using ProcessBuilder with specifying environment variables and working folder for the command:

    ProcessBuilder pb = new ProcessBuilder("ls", "-a", "-l");

    Map<String, String> env = pb.environment();
    // If you want clean environment, call env.clear() first
    // env.clear()
    env.put("VAR1", "myValue");
    env.remove("OTHERVAR");
    env.put("VAR2", env.get("VAR1") + "suffix");

    File workingFolder = new File("/home/user");
    pb.directory(workingFolder);

    Process proc = pb.start();

    BufferedReader stdInput = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(proc.getInputStream()));

    BufferedReader stdError = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(proc.getErrorStream()));

    // read the output from the command
    System.out.println("Here is the standard output of the command:\n");
    String s = null;
    while ((s = stdInput.readLine()) != null)
    {
        System.out.println(s);
    }

    // read any errors from the attempted command
    System.out.println("Here is the standard error of the command (if any):\n");
    while ((s = stdError.readLine()) != null)
    {
        System.out.println(s);
    }

Also we can use streams for obtain command output:

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {

        Runtime runtime = Runtime.getRuntime();
        String[] commands  = {"free", "-h"};
        Process process = runtime.exec(commands);

        BufferedReader lineReader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(process.getInputStream()));
        lineReader.lines().forEach(System.out::println);

        BufferedReader errorReader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(process.getErrorStream()));
        errorReader.lines().forEach(System.out::println);
    }

adapted from previous answer

public static String execCmdSync(String cmd, CmdExecResult callback) throws java.io.IOException, InterruptedException {
    RLog.i(TAG, "Running command:", cmd);

    Runtime rt = Runtime.getRuntime();
    Process proc = rt.exec(cmd);

    //String[] commands = {"system.exe","-get t"};

    BufferedReader stdInput = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(proc.getInputStream()));
    BufferedReader stdError = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(proc.getErrorStream()));

    StringBuffer stdout = new StringBuffer();
    StringBuffer errout = new StringBuffer();

    // read the output from the command
    System.out.println("Here is the standard output of the command:\n");
    String s = null;
    while ((s = stdInput.readLine()) != null) {
        System.out.println(s);
        stdout.append(s);
    }

    // read any errors from the attempted command
    System.out.println("Here is the standard error of the command (if any):\n");
    while ((s = stdError.readLine()) != null) {
        System.out.println(s);
        errout.append(s);
    }

    if (callback == null) {
        return stdInput.toString();
    }

    int exitVal = proc.waitFor();
    callback.onComplete(exitVal == 0, exitVal, errout.toString(), stdout.toString(), cmd);

    return stdInput.toString();
}

public interface CmdExecResult{
    void onComplete(boolean success, int exitVal, String error, String output, String originalCmd);
}

If use are already have Apache commons-io available on the classpath, you may use:

Process p = new ProcessBuilder("cat", "/etc/something").start();
String stderr = IOUtils.toString(p.getErrorStream(), Charset.defaultCharset());
String stdout = IOUtils.toString(p.getInputStream(), Charset.defaultCharset());

Try reading the InputStream of the runtime:

Runtime rt = Runtime.getRuntime();
String[] commands = {"system.exe","-send",argument};
Process proc = rt.exec(commands);
BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(
    new InputStreamReader(proc.getInputStream()));
String line;
while ((line = br.readLine()) != null)
    System.out.println(line);
}

You might also need to read the error stream (proc.getErrorStream()) if the process is printing error output. You can redirect the error stream to the input stream if you use ProcessBuilder.

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