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I am trying to override the creation of the Android Room entity Objects.

I want to initialize other attributes when the object is instantiated from the database. I followed Android Room Entity Documentation

I am using Room version : room-runtime:2.1.0

I tried to log message in the setter and in a constructor, but none of the message appears in my LogCat.

@Entity
// EDIT AFTER SOLUTION. You have to do this in the class that room is using to query the data, in my case it was a viewModel.
public class Client /* or ImportantInformationsClientViewModel */ {

    @SerializedName("azEMail")
    private String azEMail;

    @SerializedName("azFirstName")
    private String azFirstName;

    @SerializedName("azMobile")
    private String azMobile;

    @Ignore
    private MyMobileObject;

    public Client(String azEMail, String azFirstName, String azMobile) {
        Log.d("CLIENT_LOG", "Constructor is instanciated"); // Never logged
        this.azEMail = azEMail;
        this.azFirstName = azFirstName;
        this.azMobile = azMobile;
        // I would like to instantiate MyMobileObject each time this constructor (or the setter) is called
    }

    public String getAzEMail() {
        return azEMail;
    }

    public void setAzEMail(String azEMail) {
        Log.d("CLIENT_LOG", "Setter is called"); // Never Logged
        this.azEMail = azEMail;
    }

    public String getAzFirstName() {
        return azFirstName;
    }

    public void setAzFirstName(String azFirstName) {
        this.azFirstName = azFirstName;
    }

    public String getAzMobile() {
        return azMobile;
    }

    public void setAzMobile(String azMobile) {
        this.azMobile = azMobile;
        // I would like to instantiate MyMobileObject each time this setter (or the constructor) is called
    }

    public String getAzName() {
        return azName;
    }

    public void setAzName(String azName) {
        this.azName = azName;
    }

    public void setupObject() {
        // One ugly way to fix the problem is to call this method when my object is created. I want to avoid this. 
    }
}

One way I have found to get around the problem, is to create a setupObject method in the object, and call this method once I have the object from the query. It does work, but that's a bit ugly, and it add more code and complexity for nothing. I am trying to avoid this.

Is it possible to add specific code that will be called when android-room will create the object ? Like for exemple in the AzMobile setter ?

How does room instantiate the objects then ? The attributes are private, and the only way to access it is through the setters that doesn't seems to be called in the LogCat.

Edit after answers

The tricky thing with room is to understand how the implementation of our entities works.

My Entity was a Client Object, but when I was doing a query from the DB, I was doing the query with a ViewModel (something like ImportantInformationsClientViewModel) I thought that since Room only knew the Client Entity, it would wrap my ViewModel in the entity and built it magically from the the Entity (It's not that stupid.. It was making sense to me.. )

After checking my android-room generated DAO Implementation (ScheduleDao_Impl), I saw that room was actually directly building the ViewModel object. I just moved my attributes and function in the ViewModel and everything worked.

If I have to list the important things to know :

  • android-room use @Entity only to build the model of the objects in the SQLite databse and doesn't use the @Entity to build the query Objects

  • android-room will generate an YourDao_Impl.java object when you build your application, and you can access it with CTRL + MAJ + F

  • android-room will need ctor OR setters OR both (it only needs to have access to all the attributes)

  • Take a few hours to inspect all your ApplicationDatabase_Impl files will help you to understand how android-room works and how everything is wrap together.

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  • 1
    FWIW, also add what version of Room you're using. Jul 19 '19 at 13:21
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UPDATE (after clarification)

I'm surprised you don't see those calls. Since by inspecting the generated DAO, I can see what ROOM is doing. It queries via SQLite, and uses a Cursor to move through result(s), invoking the CTOR.

The DAO is generated at compile time, so after you build your project, hit "ctrl-shift-F" or "cmd" if you're in macOS (or whatever shortcut your Android studio uses to Find) and try to find the name of your DAO. You will see YourDao and YourDao_Impl() -> this is the autogenerated one. :) Open that.

This is a simplified copy/paste from one of my DAOs implementations:

The "Model" is RealTimeData. The Dao's method is loadAll() and it returns a List<RealTimeData> obviously.

Here's the method (removed most irrelevant stuff): I added the comments inline.

  @Override
  public List<RealTimeData> loadAll() {
    /// PREPARE THE QUERY, SQL, AND CURSOR.
    final String _sql = "SELECT * FROM realtime_data";
    final RoomSQLiteQuery _statement = RoomSQLiteQuery.acquire(_sql, 0);
    final Cursor _cursor = __db.query(_statement);
    try {
      // OBTAIN THE COLUMN NAMES FROM THE TABLE DEFINITION
      final int _cursorIndexOfId = _cursor.getColumnIndexOrThrow("id");
      final int _cursorIndexOfJsonData = _cursor.getColumnIndexOrThrow("json_data");
      final int _cursorIndexOfIsSent = _cursor.getColumnIndexOrThrow("is_sent");
      final int _cursorIndexOfDeviceId = _cursor.getColumnIndexOrThrow("device_id");
      final int _cursorIndexOfDateCreated = _cursor.getColumnIndexOrThrow("date_created");

      // THIS WILL STORE THE RESULTS
      final List<RealTimeData> _result = new ArrayList<RealTimeData>(_cursor.getCount());

      // ITERATE IT, CREATE A "RealTimeData" AND POPULATE IT.
      while(_cursor.moveToNext()) {
        final RealTimeData _item;
        final String _tmpId;
        _tmpId = _cursor.getString(_cursorIndexOfId);
        final String _tmpJsonData;
        _tmpJsonData = _cursor.getString(_cursorIndexOfJsonData);
        final Date _tmpDateCreated;
        final Long _tmp;
        // SOME THINGS NEED EXTRA CHECKS, THIS IS A DATE FIELD, STORED AS "long", SO NULL MUST BE CHECKED OR THE DATE CONVERTER WOULD THROW NPE
        if (_cursor.isNull(_cursorIndexOfDateCreated)) {
          _tmp = null;
        } else {
          _tmp = _cursor.getLong(_cursorIndexOfDateCreated);
        }
        // IT'S A DATE, SO CALL THE DATE CONVERTER (supplied via the @TypeConverter() annotation)
        _tmpDateCreated = DateConverter.toDate(_tmp);


        // BAM: INVOKE THE CTOR
        _item = new RealTimeData(_tmpId,_tmpJsonData,_tmpDateCreated);

        // NOW USE SETTERS FOR THE "OTHERS" 
        final boolean _tmpIsSent;
        final int _tmp_1;
        _tmp_1 = _cursor.getInt(_cursorIndexOfIsSent);
        _tmpIsSent = _tmp_1 != 0;
        _item.setSent(_tmpIsSent);
        final String _tmpDeviceId;
        _tmpDeviceId = _cursor.getString(_cursorIndexOfDeviceId);
        _item.setDeviceId(_tmpDeviceId);

         // AND ADD IT TO THE RESULTS...
        _result.add(_item);
      }

      // YOU GET THIS ONE :p
      return _result;
    } finally {
      _cursor.close();
      _statement.release();
    }
  }

The "Model in this case" looks exactly like this:

Entity(tableName = "realtime_data")
public class RealTimeData {

    @PrimaryKey
    @NonNull
    private String id;

    @ColumnInfo(name = "json_data")
    private String jsonData;

    @ColumnInfo(name = "is_sent")
    private boolean isSent;

    @ColumnInfo(name = "device_id")
    private String deviceId;

    @ColumnInfo(name = "date_created")
    private Date dateCreated;

    @Ignore
    RealTimeData(@NonNull final String jsonData, @NonNull final Date dateCreated) {
        id = UUID.randomUUID().toString();
        this.jsonData = jsonData;
        this.dateCreated = dateCreated;
    }

    RealTimeData(@Nonnull final String id, final String jsonData, final Date dateCreated) {
        this.id = id;
        this.jsonData = jsonData;
        this.dateCreated = dateCreated;
    }

    String getJsonData() {
        return jsonData;
    }

    @Nonnull
    public String getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public boolean isSent() {
        return isSent;
    }

    public String getDeviceId() {
        return deviceId;
    }

    public Date getDateCreated() {
        return dateCreated;
    }

    public void setSent(final boolean sent) {
        isSent = sent;
    }

    public void setDeviceId(final String deviceId) {
        this.deviceId = deviceId;
    }
}

So what you're saying is that when ROOM instantiates this, your ctor is not called?

END OF UPDATE

For what is worth, you can have additional constructors (provided they don't shadow the empty public one and/or the one that takes all the fields). Add the @Ignore attribute.

E.g.: (I'm stealing Hardik's sample from his answer for consistency)

@Entity
 public class User {
   @PrimaryKey
   private final int uid;
   private String name;
   @ColumnInfo(name = "last_name")
   private String lastName;

   public User(int uid) {
       this.uid = uid;
   }
   public String getLastName() {
       return lastName;
   }
   public void setLastName(String lastName) {
       this.lastName = lastName;
   }

   @Ignore
   User(String firstName, String lastName) {
      this.lastName = lastname;
      this.name = firstName;
   }
 }

That will work, but keep in mind that, if you don't use "autogenerated" primary keys, you need to assign one to the field before Room will accept it for insertion or similar.

Is this what you are trying to do?

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  • 1
    No, I think it was clear enough in my post but I will edit. I am trying to add something in the android-room constructors or setters. Each time I want to make a query, I want to use the constructors/setters that android-room uses to add something inside. I added commented code to explain what I want to do in the constructor / setters
    – Sacha.R
    Jul 19 '19 at 13:11
  • Ok, that makes sense. Did you look at the generated DAO for your class? I'll update my answer. Jul 19 '19 at 13:24
  • No I haven't look the generated Dao, I actually don't know where it is, how it does works and what id does. It may be the key to my answer. However, if you talk about the DAO I created to make the query.. It does exist and work (but I don't think you're talking about this)
    – Sacha.R
    Jul 19 '19 at 13:26
  • 1
    Intersting. I looked my Dao_impl. I have way way bigger Entities than I showed in my question (around 40 attributes..) I am working with ViewModels to only get the data I am interested in. Since my Data Modeling is done in my @Entity Object, I thought android-room would wrap it first in the @Entity Object, and then in the view model, but it seems that it only calls the ViewModel. That actually makes a lot of sense. I'll edit my answer to clarify how android-room works and accept your answer tomorrow. Thank you !
    – Sacha.R
    Jul 19 '19 at 13:50
  • 1
    Ok, that may make sense, since this project is still using Room 1.1.1 (pre AndroidX) version and it's not using LiveData, so that may make things more complicated. It's still a good idea to peek at the "complexity" of the Room generated code to get a good idea what is really happening behind the scenes. Good luck with your hunt and don't hesitate adding a comment or a new question; maybe someone with more Room XP can chime in and add something I don't know about it. o/ (it would perhaps be easier if you try with a simple entity with a couple of fields...) Jul 19 '19 at 13:58
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Each entity must either have a no-arg constructor or a constructor whose parameters match fields (based on type and name). Constructor does not have to receive all fields as parameters but if a field is not passed into the constructor, it should either be public or have a public setter. If a matching constructor is available, Room will always use it.

E.g.

@Entity
 public class User {
   @PrimaryKey
   private final int uid;
   private String name;
   @ColumnInfo(name = "last_name")
   private String lastName;

   public User(int uid) {
       this.uid = uid;
   }
   public String getLastName() {
       return lastName;
   }
   public void setLastName(String lastName) {
       this.lastName = lastName;
   }
 }
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  • Yes, I understood this. But how and why my setter or constructor log are never called ?
    – Sacha.R
    Jul 19 '19 at 12:59

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