2

I am writing the code that takes A 1<A<2*50 find a value b such that A+B==A^B

i tried it , but for huge values solution runs out of memory

def solve(A):
   if A==1:
       return 2
   for i in xrange(1,A+1):
        if A+i==A^i:
            return i

expected to pass for big values

  • 2
    This does not require brute-forcing.. – Martijn Pieters Jul 19 at 19:40
  • 1
    @DeveshKumarSingh: the title uses XOR, so no. – Martijn Pieters Jul 19 at 19:41
  • You don’t give a range for B nor if producing a single value for B is enough. Must B be greater than 1, smaller than 2 ** 50? – Martijn Pieters Jul 19 at 21:35
  • Next issue: There is no point in testing for A==1 if your constraints state that A is greater than 1, always. – Martijn Pieters Jul 19 at 21:38
5

You need to look at the properties of XOR. Start with a truth table for XOR, as applied to a single bit:

 A  |  B  |  A ^ B
----|-----|--------
 0  |  0  |    0
 0  |  1  |    1
 1  |  0  |    1
 1  |  1  |    0

Compare this with A + B

 A  |  B  |  A + B
----|-----|--------
 0  |  0  |    0
 0  |  1  |    1
 1  |  0  |    1
 1  |  1  |    10    # requires two bits!

So for any given bit value of A, there is Rutger 1 of 2 possible values for the correspondent bit in B that would result in exactly the same outcone regardless of using A ^ B or A + B. So for any value of A there is at least 1 value for B where A + B == A ^ B. If there are bits in A set to zero (and if B can exceed 2 ** 50, then there are an infinite number of such bits), then there are more options for B.

If all you need to produce is one number, then the easiest thing to do would be for you to focus on the A = 0, B = 1 and A = 1, B = 0 options in those tables. Because if you took the value of A and XOR-ed it with only 1s, you would turn all the bits of A into their exact opposites, and so create bits that set B = 1 for every A = 0, and B = 0 for every A = 1.

For example, take the number 42, it is expressed in binary as 101010 (1 x 32, 0 x 16, 1 x 8, 0 x 4, 1 x 2 and 0 x 1, sums up to 42). XOR that with the binary number 11111 (63 in decimal) and you flip all the bits:

>>> format(42, '06b')  # 42 in binary, the 6 lower bits
'101010'
>>> 0b111111  # binary number with 6 bits, all 1
63
>>> format(42 ^ 0b111111, '06b')  # XOR with 63, still 6 bits
'010101'
>>> 42 ^ 0b111111  # now in decimal
21

That's your best B candidate right there, both summing these and using XOR on these gives you a number with all 6 bits set, so 63 again:

>>> 42 + 21
63
>>> 42 ^ 21
63

How do you know how many bites to use? Use the int.bit_length() method:

>>> (42).bit_length()
6

How do you make an integer that uses an arbitrary number of bits, all set to 1? By taking the power of 2 to the bit length, then subtracting 1:

>>> 2 ** 6
64
>>> 2 ** 6 - 1
63
>>> format(2 ** 6 - 1, 'b')
'111111'

so the solution is:

def solve(a):
    return a ^ 2 ** a.bit_length() - 1

This trivially solves the problem for 2 ** 50 too:

>>> A = 42
>>> B = solve(A)
>>> A + B == A ^ B
True
>>> A = 2 ** 50
>>> B = solve(A)
>>> A + B == A ^ B
True

If you were to look at all the positions where A has a 0 bit, then you can generate a lot more values for B. Just start with a ^ 2 ** 50 - 1, then take each of the bits now set to 1 (that were set to 0 in A) and produce all possible combinations of setting these to 0 again. Each of those combinations is another valid value for B. I'm not going to produce code for this, because for A = 2, this includes all integers between 4 and 2 ** 50, so 1.125.899.906.842.621 different possible values for B, in addition to B = 1.

1

Assuming for a given positive integer A, we want to find the smallest positive integer B that satisfies: A+B = A^B (A XOR B)

1) for all even A(2,4,6,8...), B = 1 [Reason: LSB is 0 for all even numbers so adding 1 will satisfy our condition]

2) for odd A, B will be some power of 2. Start checking with 2

------ Code snippet (not tested)------------

def FindB(A):
    if A%2 == 0:
        return 1
    else:
        while True:
            B = 2
            if A+B == A^B:
                return B
            B *= 2
0

Let B = bitwise complement of A.

A + B = 111111111

A xor B = 11111111

  • 2
    That's not the only possible answer - B=0 always works, or any value that has 1 bits only in places where A has 0s. – jasonharper Jul 19 at 19:48
  • 1
    101+0 == 101, 101^0 == 101. I have no idea what you're going "Huh?" about. – jasonharper Jul 19 at 20:43
  • b1001 + b100 = b1101 = 9 + 4 = 13 and b1001 ^ b100 = b1101 = 9 ^ 4 = 13 – mypetlion Jul 19 at 21:00
  • If we limit B to the same range as A, then B can't be 0. That still leaves 2 ** (number of bits set to zero in (2 ** 50 - 1 ^ A) possible values for B. – Martijn Pieters Jul 19 at 21:00
  • 1
    @mypetlion the point of my remark was to put an upper bound on the possible values of B, as an illustration. With no such limits, there is an infinite number of possible values for B. – Martijn Pieters Jul 19 at 21:27

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