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I have two entities, Tag and Member. A member can be marked with multiple tags. A tag can be used to mark multiple members. It's a clear case of many-to-many relation and since I'm using EF Core, I have to declare an explicit connector, which I call Tag_Member. I configure it in the following way.

private void OnModelCreating(EntityTypeBuilder<Tag_Member> entity)
{
  entity.HasKey(e => new { e.TagId, e.MemberId });
  entity.HasOne(e => e.Tag);
  entity.HasOne(e => e.Member)
    .WithMany(e => e.Tag_Member)
    .HasForeignKey(e => e.MemberId);
}

The behavior I wish to enforce when deleting is as follows.

  • When removing an instance of Tag_Member, nothing is changed.
  • When removing an instance of Tag, any connected instances of Tag_Member are deleted.
  • When removing an instance of Member, any connected instances of Tag_Member are deleted.

I'm confused on two points. When I add the condition for deletion as shown below, I have a lot of options to pick from and, despite reading the intellisense, I don't feel certain which to use to enforce the above behavior.

entity.HasOne(e => e.Member)
  .WithMany(e => e.Tag_Member)
  .HasForeignKey(e => e.MemberId)
  .OnDelete(DeleteBehavior.NoAction);

Should I use NoAction, ClientNoAction, Restrict or someting else? I'm not even clear on which of hte entities that the deletetion behavior affects. Which is it?

The second point of confusion is that I don't get OnDelete() to appear for the tag configuration. I haven't used WithMany() because that entity lacks references back to the interlinking entity. Can I still manage its deletion behavior? Do I need to explicitly declare it to achieve the requested behavior?

entity.HasOne(e => e.Tag)
  .OnDelete(DeleteBehavior.NoAction);

The classes look roughly like this.

public class Tag { public Guid Id { get; set; } }
public class Member { public Guid Id { get; set; } }

public class Tag_Member
{
  public Guid TagId { get; set; }
  public Guid MemberId { get; set; }
  public Tag Tag { get; set; }
  public Member Member { get; set; }
}

My references are mainly this and this.

edit: Based on the suggestions in the answer, this is the final version of the relation between members and tag.

private static void OnModelCreating(EntityTypeBuilder<Member> entity)
{
  entity.HasKey(e => e.Id); ...
}

private static void OnModelCreating(EntityTypeBuilder<Tag> entity)
{
  entity.HasKey(e => e.Id); ...
}

private static void OnModelCreating(EntityTypeBuilder<Member_Tag> entity)
{
  entity.HasKey(e => new { e.MemberId, e.TagId });
  entity.HasOne(e => e.Member).WithMany().OnDelete(DeleteBehavior.NoAction);
  entity.HasOne(e => e.Tag).WithMany().OnDelete(DeleteBehavior.NoAction);
}
4

I'm not even clear on which of hte entities that the deletetion behavior affects. Which is it?

That's easy. The cascade delete always affects the dependent entity (i.e. the entity containing the FK).

I don't feel certain which to use to enforce the above behavior. Should I use NoAction, ClientNoAction, Restrict or someting else?

You seem to be using EF Core 3.0 preview which adds more options not documented yet. But the option for classic cascade delete implemented at the database level has always been Cascade.

I haven't used WithMany() because that entity lacks references back to the interlinking entity.

In order to be able to fluently configure the relationship aspects, you have to fully specify the relationship parties by using the Has + With pair. Since navigation properties are not mandatory for either side of the relationship, all you need it to pass the correct argument to Has / With method - if you do have navigation property, pass the name or lambda expression accessor, otherwise don't pass anything (but still include the call). e.g.

entity.HasOne(e => e.Tag)
    .WithMany() // <--
    .OnDelete(DeleteBehavior.Cascade); // now you can do this

But note that DeleteBehavior.Cascade is the default for required relationships (in other words, when the FK is non nullable type), so you normally don't need fluent configuration for that. And if the property names follow the EF Core naming conventions, you don't need fluent configuration at all.

Simple example can be seen here.

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    I get the idea in the 1-to-many case but in many-to-many, I somehow fail to grasp it. I want to cascade a deletion but only one way and only half-way through. Meaning - if I remove a tag, I want all the tag-member instances gone. But I want the linked members to stay. Also if I remove a tag-member instance, I want it not to cascade anything. So I want do cascade deletion from tag to tag-member but not to member itself. And I want not to cascade anything from tag-member to tag. (Correspondingly from member to tag of course.) Should I declare cascading three times (for tag, member, tag-member)? – DonkeyBanana Jul 21 at 13:58
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    Should I declare cascading three times (for tag, member, tag-member)? I was told to only configure the relations between X and Y at one place (either configuring X or configuring Y). But perhaps that person was mistaken. What do you think? – DonkeyBanana Jul 21 at 14:00
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    See the first part of the answer. Cascade always work from principal to dependant. Many-to-many relationship is simple 2 one-to-many relationship, Tag and Member are principals, and the join entity is dependent of both relatioships. So cascade works exactly the way you want - deleting Tag or Member deletes the related links, but not the "other" object from the link. – Ivan Stoev Jul 21 at 14:02
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    Each relationship includes 2 entities, but it's still 1 relationship, so it has to be configured once. a.HasMany(a => a.Bs).WithOne(b => b.A) is exactly the same as b.HasOne(b => b.A).WithMany(a => a.Bs) and both represent one and the same relationship. So no, you need only 2 fluent configurations because you have 2 relationships. – Ivan Stoev Jul 21 at 14:06
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    Sorry for being dense. I think I start to grasp it, thanks to you explanation. Would you throw an eye at the edit where I show the final setup for the entities? I moved the configuration of the two relations to the method that manages the middle man. It makes most sense and appears to be clean. I also set the cascading to NoAction in both ends because deleting the middle instance should never affect the linked ones. – DonkeyBanana Jul 27 at 11:48

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