0

I wrote several Python 3 modules of the following format:

def some_module():
'''Do something.

Parameters
----------
Returns
-------
'''
# Some code

When I run PyLint or PyLint3 over the file, I get the following error:

************* Module some_module.some_module
C: 1, 0: Missing module docstring (missing-docstring)

What am I doing wrong? Does PyLint require a specific docstring style?

  • 2
    Your example is a function docstring, pylint asks you to document the module itself. – Norrius Jul 20 '19 at 0:05
  • As I understand from this question, functions contain reusable code for specific tasks, while modules are bundles of functions, classes etc. But in this case, all modules consist of only a single function, so there is no need for a module-level docstring. Is PyLint able to understand this? Or should even simple functions have both a module and a function docstring? Or should I avoid creating too many functions and rather bundle them into modules? – david Jul 20 '19 at 14:30
  • Also, from this discussion it's not clear what differentiates function docstrings from module docstrings. Could it be that PEP 8 and PEP 257 are only relevant for the organization of large projects and have only limited value for small scripts? – david Jul 20 '19 at 14:45
  • 1
    Put simply, modules are .py files. Pylint doesn't really "understand" anything, it simply checks (statically) your code against a bunch of rules. In particular, missing-docstring checks that modules, classes and functions have docstrings (i.e. __doc__). Whether you want to enforce these rules or not is up to you. For example, I've found too-few-public-methods to be pretty useless, so I usually disable it. – Norrius Jul 20 '19 at 14:47
  • Ok, I see. Thanks! – david Jul 20 '19 at 15:40
0

Have you tried indenting the doc-string, so it identified as part of the module?

def some_module():
    '''Do something.

    Parameters
    ----------
    Returns
    -------
    '''
    # Some code
    ...

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