5

Suppose we have the following class composing the role Iterable:

class Word-Char does Iterable {
    has @.words;

    method !pairize($item) {
        return $item => $item.chars;
    }

    method iterator( Word-Char:D: ) {
        @!words.map({self!pairize($_)}).rotor(1).iterator
    }
}

I could assign the object to a Positional variable during object construction and iterate over that variable:

my @words = Word-Char.new: words => <the sky is blue>;
.say for @words;

OUTPUT:

(the => 3)
(sky => 3)
(is  => 2)
(blue => 4)

However, what if the object is being passed around? How do I make sure it's still iterable?:

my $w = Word-Char.new: words => <the sky is blue>;
sub f( $w ) {
    .say for $w
}
f($w);

OUTPUT:

Word-Char.new(words => ["the", "sky", "is", "blue"])

Goal:

By using Iterable, Iterator or both, I would like, if possible, to be able to iterate over an instance object of the class implementing these roles anywhere. Right now I know that by assigning the instance object during the object construction to a Positional variable, I can get the iterable items the class provide but this isn't what I want. Instead I want to pass the object itself and iterate over it wherever/whenever I deem it necessary.

6

When dealing with scalar values that do the iterator role, the simplest way to accomplish what you are attempting is to tell perl6 your scalar value is iterable. You can do that by postfixing it with []. Your example then looks like this:

my $w = Word-Char.new: words => <the sky is blue>;
.say for $w[]

Another thing....

Your iteration code has a bug in that it doesn't reset itself before returning IterationEnd. A quick fix looks like the following:

class Word-Char does Iterable does Iterator {
    has @.words;
    has Int $!index = 0;

    method !pairize($item) {
        return $item => $item.chars;
    }

    method iterator() {self}
    method pull-one( --> Mu ) {
        if $!index < @!words.elems {
            my $item = @!words[$!index];
            $!index += 1;
            return self!pairize($item);
        }
        else {
            $!index = 0;
            return IterationEnd;
        }
    }
}

However, this means that you have to keep all of the iteration logic (and its attributes) with the main class. Another, way would be to use an anonymous class, instead of using self:

class Word-Char does Iterable {
    has @.words;

    method !pairize($item) {
        return $item => $item.chars;
    }

    method iterator() {
        my @words = @!words;

        class :: does Iterator {
            has $.index is rw = 0;

            method pull-one {
              return IterationEnd if $!index >= @words.elems;
              @words[$!index++];
            }
        }.new;
    } 
}

The advantage of the above is that you can keep your iteration logic cleaner and isolated from the rest of the object. You also don't need to worry about resetting state.

  • Welcome to SO/SE Xliff! This is I think the first time I've seen a really decent use case for anonymous classes. – guifa Jul 21 at 23:47
  • The solution using the anonymous class doesn't compile. The error is Attribute $!index not declared in class Word-Char in the .pull-one() method. – Fernando Santagata Jul 23 at 8:20
  • @FernandoSantagata - Ack! You are correct. I've updated the code. – Xliff Jul 24 at 10:49
4

OK, not clear what you want to achieve here, but let's give it a try. The main problem in the second example is that you have changed a Positional (with w) with an Scalar. Simply use again @w and you're set

my @w = Word-Char.new: words => <the sky is blue>;
sub f( @w ) {
    .say for @w
}
f(@w);

This would work exactly in the same way, because @w is still Positional, and thus Iterable. When you call $w, the Scalar just returns its only item, which is the object, and that's what is printed. If you want to use the scalar sigil on this object and also iterate over it, you need to make it an Iterator also.

  • I probably misunderstood what iteration means. I thought I was giving that property to the class and thus any of its instance would be capable to be iterated over anywhere, not only during object construction. By assigning the object during object construction to a Positional I can get the object's iterable items but I wanted to be able to pass the object around. That's why I asked however, what if the object is being passed around? How do I make sure it's still iterable?. – uzlxxxx Jul 20 at 14:12
  • I thought of passing the object and then assign it to a Positional to get its iterable items but that doesn't seem to work. Like so sub f($w) { my @items = $w; .say for @items; }. I'll try using the Iterator role and report back. – uzlxxxx Jul 20 at 14:19
  • @uzlxxxx the fact that there's Iterable and Iterator makes it kind of confusing; also the fact that the Iterable has the iterator method.. But the example in the documentation should be kind of clear. What makes it Iterable is the fact that it's a Positional. If it stops being a Positional, it will not get the Iterable role. – jjmerelo Jul 20 at 20:43
  • You're right. I think this is something that could possible be further improved in the documentation. What makes it Iterable is the fact that it's a Positional. Wouldn't it be more accurate to say What makes it Iterable is the fact that it's assigned to a Positional. As I see it, after the object's assigned to a Positional, we lose hold of the object itself but its iterable elements. Thanks for the clarification. – uzlxxxx Jul 20 at 23:10
  • @uzlxxxx yep, kinda, but it's the Positional which is iterable, not the object... – jjmerelo Jul 21 at 6:28
2

On #perl6, jnthn provided several approaches. Some of them don't behave as I expect them to though.

I updated the class as follow as per jjmerelo's suggestion:

class Word-Char does Iterable does Iterator {
    has @.words;
    has Int $!index = 0;

    method !pairize($item) {
        return $item => $item.chars;
    }

    method iterator() {self}
    method pull-one( --> Mu ) {
        if $!index < @!words.elems {
            my $item = @!words[$!index];
            $!index += 1;
            return self!pairize($item);
        }
        else {
            return IterationEnd;
        }
    }
}

1. Bind the object to a Positional

# Binding to a Positional
my @w01 := Word-Char.new: words => <the sky is blue>;

This produces the following error:

Type check failed in binding; expected Positional but got Word-Char...

2. Use | at the point of iteration

my $w = Word-Char.new: words => <the sky is blue>;

for |$w {
    .say
}

=begin comment
Word-Char.new(words => ["the", "sky", "is", "blue"])
=end comment

| doesn't have an affect on the object which seems to hold on to its scalar nature and thus for doesn't iterate over it.

3. Use a sigilless variable

my \w = Word-Char.new: words => <the sky is blue>;

for w {
    .say
}

=begin comment
he => 3
sky => 3
is => 2
blue => 4
=end comment

So far this is the cleanest approach which does what I expect.

4. Rather than making the class iterable, add a method that returns something iterable.

In fact, this one was my first approach but I didn't find it to be too p6y. In any case, for this to work we need to update our class and add a method that returns something iterable. The method's name of my choice is LOOP-OVER if only to make it stand out from everything else.

class Word-Char {
    has @.words;

    method !pairize($item) {
        return $item => $item.chars;
    }

    method LOOP-OVER {
        gather for @!words -> $word {
            take self!pairize($word)
        }
    }
}

my $w = Word-Char.new: words => <the sky is blue>;

for $w.LOOP-OVER {
    .say
}

=begin comment
he => 3
sky => 3
is => 2
blue => 4
=end comment

But what if we rely on several classes behaving iteratively? How do we make sure they implement the same method? The most straightforward way is to compose a role (e.g., Iterationable) which implements a stub LOOP-OVER method, in this instance.

role Iterationable {
    method LOOP-OVER { ... }
}

class Word-Char does Iterationable {
    has @.words;

    method !pairize($item) {
        return $item => $item.chars;
    }

    method LOOP-OVER {
        gather for @!words -> $word {
            take self!pairize($word)
        }
    }
}

class Names does Iterationable {
    has @.names;

    method LOOP-OVER {
        gather for @!names -> $name {
            take $name.split(/\s+/)».tc.join(' ')
        }
    }
}

class NotIterable {
    has @.items
}

my @objs =
    Word-Char.new(words => <the sky is blue>), 
    Names.new(names => ['Jose arat', 'elva  delorean', 'alphonse romer']),
    NotIterable.new(items => [5, 'five', 'cinco', 'cinq'])
;

for @objs -> $obj {
    if $obj.can('LOOP-OVER') {
        put "» From {$obj.^name}: ";
        for $obj.LOOP-OVER {
            .say
        }
    }
    else {
        put "» From {$obj.^name}: Cannot iterate over it";
    }
}

=begin comment
» From Word-Char: 
the => 3
sky => 3
is => 2
blue => 4
» From Names: 
Jose Arat
Elva Delorean
Alphonse Romer
» From NotIterable: Cannot iterate over it
=end comment

As stated by jnthn, what approach to use (from the working ones at least) will hardly depend on the problem at hand.

  • Re #1, making a class implement Positional is actually fairly easy and I'd recommend doing it if for all intents and purposes you want to use it as such. You only have to implement 3 methods: elems, AT-POS, and EXISTS-POS. Since you have an internal array, you can just delegate things to it: method elems { @words.elems }; method AT-POS($i) { @words[$i] }; method EXISTS-POS($i) { @words[$i]:exists } and it will make your users life a lot easier (it actually would then probably allow for |@words to work even if you never end up making it Iterable, but I haven't tested) – guifa Jul 21 at 23:45
1

Another (somewhat messy) solution is:

class Word-Char does Iterator {
  has @.words;
  has Int $.index is rw = 0;

  method pull-one() {
    LEAVE { $!index++ }
    return $!index < @!words.elems
           ?? (@!words[$!index] => @!words[$!index].chars)
           !! IterationEnd;
  }
}

my $w = Word-Char.new: words => <the sky is blue>;
my $seq = Seq.new($w).cache;
sub f( $w ) {
  .say for $w[]
}
f($seq);
$w.index = 0;
f($seq);

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