10

This question already has an answer here:

Why does the following comparison of two variables return (1, False, 2), instead of just True.

a = 1
b = 2
a,b == 1,2

marked as duplicate by cs95 python-3.x Jul 20 at 17:36

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  • 6
    You are creating tuple (1, False, 2): 1 is a, False is result of comparison b==1 and 2 is b. Put (a, b) == (1, 2) into brackets instead. – Andrej Kesely Jul 20 at 7:58
  • @AndrejKesely Thanks. then what is the way around. you do understand what i am trying to do there right? [a == 1 and b == 2]. this is okay for few conditions but i am dealing with like 10 and above conditions. – Sid Jul 20 at 8:02
  • The basic answer is operator precedence (yes, the comma is an operator in this context). The logical comparison binds tighter than the comma, so you get the behaviour seen. The duplicate explains this, although it approaches the problem from another perspective. – cs95 Jul 20 at 17:38
  • Instead of double == use single = to get the expected results # a,b = 1,2 – shantanuo Jul 24 at 13:22
13

Essentially this apparently weird behavior come from the fact that the right side of your expression is a tuple, the left side is not.

The expected result is achieved with this line, which compares a tuple with a tuple:

(a, b) == (1, 2)

Your expression instead is equivalent to:

(a, b == 1, 2)

Which is a tuple containing a, the comparison between b and 1, and 2.

You can see the different behavior using the dis module to check what python is doing:

import dis

dis.dis("a,b == 1,2")
  1           0 LOAD_NAME                0 (a)
              2 LOAD_NAME                1 (b)
              4 LOAD_CONST               0 (1)
              6 COMPARE_OP               2 (==)
              8 LOAD_CONST               1 (2)
             10 BUILD_TUPLE              3
             12 RETURN_VALUE

 dis.dis("(a,b) == (1,2)")
  1           0 LOAD_NAME                0 (a)
              2 LOAD_NAME                1 (b)
              4 BUILD_TUPLE              2
              6 LOAD_CONST               0 ((1, 2))
              8 COMPARE_OP               2 (==)
             10 RETURN_VALUE

You can see that in the first evaluation python is loading a, then is loading and b then loading the right side element of the comparison (1) and compare the last two loaded elements, then load the second right-element then build a tuple with the results of those operations and returns it.

In the second code instead python loads the left side (operations 0, 2 and 4) , loads the right side (operation 6), compare them and return the value.

10

You need to explicitly compare the two tuples using parantheses:

a = 1
b = 2
print((a,b) == (1,2))  # True

Right now, you're creating the tuple (a, b == 1, b). That evaluates to (1, False, 2).

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