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I just started learning the language but got stuck at the very beginning. I am writing a very simple calculator in which the user must enter values in one line. I get these values in order and save them into variables with which I operate. In order to preserve values and perform operations, I have a separate class called Сalс.

package com.company;
import java.util.Scanner;


public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.print("Enter expression:");
        Calc calc = new Calc();
        System.out.printf("Result is:" + calc);
    }
}

class Calc {
    Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);
    int num1 = scanner.nextInt();
    String operation = scanner.next();
    int num2 = scanner.nextInt();

    public int calc(int num1, int num2, String operation){
        int result;
        switch (operation){
            case "+": result = num1+num2; break;
            case "-": result = num1-num2; break;
            case "*": result = num1*num2; break;
            case "/": result = num1/num2; break;
            default: System.out.println("The operation is not recognized. Repeat entry.");
                result = calc(num1, num2, operation);
        }
        return result;
    }
}

I tried to call the result directly using:

calc(result)
calc.calc(result)

but got "Cannot resolve symbol "result".

In the main class, I expect to get the value already calculated. Please help me.

  • 1
    you have to call method with arguments on your calc object - calc.calc(1, 2, "+") – michalk Jul 20 at 13:23
  • I have a scanner that should give me the values that the user will enter. The program substitutes them (values) in the calc method which the finished result should send to the main class. I want the output to have an already calculated result without the need for the code to specify numbers and operators in advance. – Alice Jul 20 at 13:32
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There's really no point in using "OOP" or classes for this, but with simple modifications you could at least get your code to work:

import java.util.Scanner;

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.print("Enter expression:");
        Calc calc = new Calc();
        System.out.printf("Result is: " + calc.calc());
    }
}

class Calc {
    public int calc(){
        Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);
        int num1 = scanner.nextInt();
        String operation = scanner.next();
        int num2 = scanner.nextInt();

        int result = 0;
        switch (operation){
            case "+": result = num1+num2; break;
            case "-": result = num1-num2; break;
            case "*": result = num1*num2; break;
            case "/": result = num1/num2; break;
            default:
                System.out.println("The operation is not recognized. Repeat entry.");
                calc();
        }
        scanner.close();
        return result;
    }
}

Notice that in your original code, you never called the calc() method in your main method.

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You defined logic that takes user input as instance fields of Calc class - I do not think this is what you desired. You should move this logic to your main method. Right now user will be asked for input when object of Calc class is initialized and this is really untypicall I think - it should happen inside some method's body.

Moreover you created a method calc in your Calc class, so you should invoke this method and pass relevant arguments there.

And also default label code in your switch statemnt will cause infinite recursion when operation is not supported so you should find another way of asking user for input again (loop is the keyword) - temporairly I chose to throw an expcetion - but you should find a way to deal with it by yourself. Code after fixes will look like this :

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("Enter expression:");
        Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);

        int num1 = scanner.nextInt();
        String operation = scanner.next();
        int num2 = scanner.nextInt();

        Calc calc = new Calc();
        System.out.printf("Result is:" + calc.calc(num1, num2, operation));
    }
}

class Calc {

    public int calc(int num1, int num2, String operation){
        int result;
        switch (operation){
            case "+": result = num1+num2; break;
            case "-": result = num1-num2; break;
            case "*": result = num1*num2; break;
            case "/": result = num1/num2; break;
            default: System.out.println("The operation is not recognized. Repeat entry.");
                throw new IllegalArgumentException("Operation not supported");
        }
        return result;
    }
}
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There are multiple things to discuss here. Let's start with the result variable. Here, it is all about scope. Variable result is a local variable and thus only visible from ist point of declaration to the end of the surrounding method. This means that you would be able to write something like this in your main method:

final int result = calc.calc(num1, num2, operation);
System.out.println(System.out.printf("Result is:" + result);

But this would leave you with the problem to read num1, num2 and operation before calling calc.calc(...), which is what you wanted to prevent by creating class calc. You read the values when constructing an object of class Calc. I would strongly advice against this approach and offload reading of values in a separate method and instead write a constructor in Calc that accepts two int-values and one String-value. here is a rough sketch:

public class Cals {
    private final int num1;
    private final int num2;
    private final String operation;

    public Calc(final int num1, final int num2, final String operation) {
        this.num1 = num1;
        this.num2 = num2;
        this.operation = operation;
    }

    public int calc() {
        int result;
        switch (operation){
            case "+":
                result = num1 + num2; 
                break;
            case "-": 
                result = num1 - num2; 
                break;
            case "*":
                result = num1 * num2; 
                break;
            case "/":
                result = num1 / num2;
                break;
            default: 
                System.out.println("The operation is not recognized. Aborting.");
                return 0;
        }
        return result;
    }
}

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ...
        final Calc calc = readValuesFromConsoleAndConstructCalcObject();
        ...
        System.out.println(calc.calc());
    }

    public static Calc readValuesFromConsoleAndConstructCalcObject() {
        final Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.print("Enter 1st number: ");
        final int num1 = scanner.nextInt();

        System.out.print("Enter operation: ");
        final String operation = scanner.next();

        System.out.print("Enter 2nd number: ");
        final int num2 = scanner.nextInt();

        return new Calc(num1, num2, operation);
    }
}

As you may have noticed, I also removed the parameters from method calc() and use the object properties instead.

I also eliminated the recursive call in the default branch of the switch within calc in order to prevent endless recursion.


Some remarks on your code:

  • Object properties (or fields, or attributes, or however you name it) should always be set to private and only accessed through mutators.
  • Always make a line break after a semicolon. Always.
  • Be consistent wrt. your code style. Either set blanks on both sides of binary operators (=, ==, +, -, *, /, ...) or none at all. You are mixing both styles.
  • For learning purposes, it is okay to make a switch over a String, in production this can be a performance issue. I would advice to use an Enum to represent the allowed math operations.
  • Also, returning 0 (or really any value in this case) when something goes wrong is a smell. I would advice to throw an Exception, in this case I am tempted to throw an IllegalArgumentException.

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