4

This is a markdown document example.md I have:

## New language

Perl 6 is a new language different from Perl 5.

## what does it offer
+ Object-oriented programming including generics, roles and multiple dispatch
+ Functional programming primitives, lazy and eager list evaluation, junctions, autothreading and hyperoperators (vector operators)
+ Parallelism, concurrency, and asynchrony including multi-core support
+ Definable grammars for pattern matching and generalized string processing
+ Optional and gradual typing



This code will be evaluated.


```{perl6 evaluate=TRUE}
4/5
```



Rakudo is a compiler for Perl 6 code. Install it and you're all set to run Perl 6 programs!

This code will be evaluated.

```{perl6 evaluate=TRUE}
say "this is promising";
say $*CWD;
```



This code will **not** be evaluated.


```{perl6 evaluate=FALSE}
say "Hello world";
```

which I want to convert into example.md as shown below with the code and output within it.

## New language

Perl 6 is a new language different from Perl 5.

## what does it offer
+ Object-oriented programming including generics, roles and multiple dispatch
+ Functional programming primitives, lazy and eager list evaluation, junctions, autothreading and hyperoperators (vector operators)
+ Parallelism, concurrency, and asynchrony including multi-core support
+ Definable grammars for pattern matching and generalized string processing
+ Optional and gradual typing



This code will be evaluated.

Code:
```{perl6 evaluate=TRUE}
4/5
```

Output:
```
0.8
```

Rakudo is a compiler for Perl 6 code. Install it and you're all set to run Perl 6 programs!

This code will be evaluated.

Code:
```{perl6 evaluate=TRUE}
say "this is promising";
say $*CWD;
```

Output:
```
this is promising
"C:\Users\suman".IO
```

This code will **not** be evaluated.

Code:
```{perl6 evaluate=FALSE}
say "Hello world";
```

What I want to accomplish is:

  • capture the code between backticks{perl6 evaluate} and backticks
  • execute the code if evaluate is TRUE
  • insert the code and output back into the document

What I tried to do:

  1. Capture multiline code and evaluate expression
my $array= 'example.md'.IO.slurp;

#multiline capture code chunk and evaluate separately
if $array~~/\`\`\`\{perl6 (.*)\}(.*)\`\`\`/ {
    #the first capture $0 will be evaluate
    if $0~~"TRUE"{
        #execute second capture which is code chunk which is captured in $1
        }else {
       # don't execute code
        };
};
  1. create a temp.p6 file and write code chunk $1 from above into it
my $fh="temp.p6".IO.spurt: $1;
  1. execute the chunk if $0 is TRUE
my $output= q:x/perl6 temp.p6/ if $0==TRUE
  1. integrate all this into final example.md while we create intermediate example_new.md
my $fh-out = open "example_new.md", :w; # Create a new file

# Print out next file, line by line
for "$file.tex".IO.lines -> $line {

    # write output of code to example_new.md

}
$fh-out.close;

# copy
my $io = IO::Path.new("example_new.md");
$io.copy("example.md");

# clean up
unlink("example.md");

# move
$io.rename("example.md");

I am stuck in the first step. Any help?

  • The two examples of example.md are exactly the same - were they supposed to be different? – Dean Taylor Jul 20 at 19:08
  • 1
    @DeanTaylor Thanks for pointing out. I have fixed it. – Suman Khanal Jul 26 at 0:46
  • @SumanKhanal I haven't edited my answer to match your example.md edit re Dean because what you already had made sense to me. That is to say, my code handles input with or without Output: sections and assumes Code: as the prefix for the code to be evaluated. But it would be trivial to edit it to suit whatever you want. I've added a link to glot.io in my answer so you or others can eliminate any confusion by running the code against your original example.md and editing as desired. I'd appreciate some feedback from you whether my answer is more or less what you were looking for. TIA. – raiph Jul 28 at 12:40
  • @raiph Thank you. I want to clear some confusions. Original example.md file will have code chunks. Its won't have Code: and Output:. It is present only in the output example.md file. If evaluate==TRUE in code chunk, then the code is executed. In final document whether code is executed or not, Code: will be present before chunk and if chunk executed, the output will have Output: before it. Could you please update the code accordingly at glot.io ? Currently its not throwing output as expected. Thank you. – Suman Khanal Jul 28 at 14:46
  • Hi @SumanKhanal. Thanks for commenting. I've updated my answer and the code at glot.io. Lmk if that works for you. TIA. – raiph Jul 28 at 16:18
4

Code that accomplishes "What I want to accomplish"

You can run this code against your data with glot.io.

use v6;

constant $ticks = '```';

my regex Search {
  $ticks '{perl6 evaluate=' $<evaluate>=(TRUE|FALSE) '}'
  $<code>=[<!before $ticks> .]*
  $ticks
}

sub Replace ($/) {
  "Code:\n" ~ $ticks ~ $<code> ~ $ticks ~
    ($<evaluate> eq 'TRUE'
      ?? "\n\n" ~ 'Output:' ~ "\n" ~ $ticks ~ "\n" ~ Evaluate($<code>) ~ $ticks
      !! '');
}

sub Evaluate ($code) {
  my $out; my $*OUT = $*OUT but role { method print (*@args) { $out ~= @args } }
  use MONKEY; my $eval-result = EVAL $code;
  $out // $eval-result ~ "\n"
}

spurt
  'example_new.md',
  slurp('example.md')
    .subst: &Search, &Replace, :g;

Explanation

Starting at the bottom and then working upwards:

  • The .subst method substitutes parts of its invocant string that need to be replaced and returns the revised string. .subst's first argument is a matcher; it can be a string, or, as here, a regex -- &Search1. .subst's second argument is a replacement; this can also be a string, or, as here, a Callable -- &Replace. If it's a Callable then .subst passes the match from the matcher as a match object2 as the first argument to the Callable. The :g adverb directs .subst to do the search/replace repeatedly for as many matches as there are in the invocant string.

  • slurp generates a string in one go from a file. No need for open, using handles, close, etc. Its result in this case becomes the invocant of the .subst explained above.

  • spurt does the opposite, generating a file in one go from a string, in this case the results of the slurp(...).subst... operation.

  • The Evaluate routine generates a string that's the output from evaluating the string of code passed to it. To capture the result of evaluation it temporarily modifies P6's STDOUT variable $*OUT, redirecting prints (and thus also says etc.) to the internal variable $out before EVALing the code. If the EVAL results in anything being printd to $out then that is returned; if not, then the result of the EVAL is returned (coerced to a string by the ~). (A newline is appended in this second scenario but not the first because that is what's needed to get the correctly displayed result given how you've "specified" things by your example.)

  • The Replace routine is passed a match object from a call of the Code regex. It reconstructs the code section (without the evaluate bit) using the $<code> capture. If the $<evaluate> capture is 'TRUE' then it also appends a fresh Output: section using the Evaluate routine explained above to produce the code's output.

  • The Code regex matches a code section. It captures the TRUE or FALSE setting from the evaluate directive into a capture named $<evaluate> and the code into a capture named $<code>.

Footnotes

1 To pass a routine (a regex is a routine) rather than call it, it must be written with a sigil (&foo), not without (foo).

2 It does this even if the matcher was merely a string!

5

There are two ways to execute the code and capture the output:

  • You can write it to a tempfile and use my $result = qqx{perl6 $filename} to spawn a separate process
  • You can execute the code in the same interpreter using EVAL, and use IO::Capture::Simple to capture STDOUT:
my $re = regex {
    ^^ # logical newline
    '```{perl6 evaluate=' (TRUE|FALSE) '}'
    $<code>=(.*?)
    '```'
}

for $input.match(:global, $re) -> $match {
    if $match[0] eq 'TRUE' {
        use IO::Capture::Simple;
        my $result = capture_stdout {
            use MONKEY-SEE-NO-EVAL;
            EVAL $match<code>;
        }
        # use $result now
    }
}

Now you just need to switch from match to subst and return the value from that block that you want to substitute in, and then you're done.

I hope this gives you some idea how to proceed.

  • Thank you. Your code worked fine but while evaluating 4/5 in one chunk, its throwing Any as output. What could be the reason its not 0.8? – Suman Khanal Jul 21 at 11:42
  • The code I posted just looks at output to STDOUT, and 4/5 doesn't produce any output. Change it say 4/5. You could also check return value from EVAL, but my experience with IRC bots is that it's confusing if both output and return value are printed. – moritz Jul 21 at 12:17
-1

You can try this regex:

```{perl6 evaluate=(?<evaluate>[^}]+)}\s+(?<code>[^`]+)

You will get three results from your sample text, each result contains two named groups, the first is evaluate, containing the flag and the second one codeis the code.

Have a look at the regex-demo:
https://regex101.com/r/EsERkJ/1

Since I don't know perl, i can't help you with the implementation :(

  • Perl6 has a redesigned regex engine. (Which makes it easier to understand and write once you get used to it.) For example (?<a>…) is now written $<a> = (…). (You can get back to the Perl5 style of regex using the :P5 adverb.) Also every non-letter character and space must be escaped if you want it to match literally. Character classes are written differently as well. "{perl6 evaluate=" $<evaluate> = (<-[}]>+) "}" (A regex is treated as code with a different base syntax. They can have parameters and variables.) – Brad Gilbert Jul 28 at 15:06

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