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How can I send an SMS email as a name such as Joe Doe or (846) 596-2256?

I can send an SMS message to a phone number with any email I want with this code here


import smtplib

to = 'xxxxxxxxxx@xxxx.com'
sender_user = 'xxx@provider.com'
sender_pwd = 'xxx'

fake_email = 'fake@fake.com'
fake_name = 'Fake Name'

message = 'This is a test message!'

smtpserver = smtplib.SMTP("smtp.emailprovider.com", 587)

smtpserver.ehlo()
smtpserver.starttls()
smtpserver.ehlo

smtpserver.login(sender_user, sender_pwd)
header = f'To: {to}\nFrom: "{fake_name}" <{fake_email}>\nSubject: \n'

msg = header + '\n' + message + '\n\n'

smtpserver.sendmail(sender_user, to, msg)

smtpserver.close()

And it appears on the phone like this


Fake Text Message ScreenShot


Is it possible to remove the @domain.com part? If I do not enter a valid email (Containing a *@*.*) the text message will either not go through entirely or appear as a text message sent by 6245 which after a bit of research is the number which Verizon (my carrier) will send an invalid SMS as. Can I do this with just a python script?

  • if portal doesn't accept mails without @domain.com then you can't do this in python and in any other language. – furas Jul 21 at 0:31
  • @furas Sorry, I'm kinda new to this email SMS stuff so can you clarify, is the portal that you are referring to the carrier of the target or the email service I am using to send the email? – Jack Stoller Jul 21 at 0:36
  • Small suggestion, consider to use f-strings instead of + strings. f'To: {to}\nFrom: {fake_name} <{fake_email}>\n{Subject}: \n' it really makes things easier to understand. msg = f'{header}\n{message}\n\n' – Saelyth Jul 21 at 0:40
  • @Saelyth, thankyou didn't know they even existed. It cleaned that line up a lot – Jack Stoller Jul 21 at 0:44
  • @furas Would it be possible to force the messager to display only the fake_name. That way I could send it as whatever email as I wanted and allow it to get through but still have control over the final name displayed – Jack Stoller Jul 21 at 21:41

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