4

I have been developing a simple framework for embedded environments. I came to a design decision on whether to use virtual calls, CRTP, or maybe a switch statement. I have been told that vtables perform poorly in embedded.
Following up from this question vftable performance penalty vs. switch statement I decided to run my own test. I ran three different ways to call a member function.

  1. using the etl library's etl::function, a library meant to mimic the stl library but for embedded environments.(no dynamic allocations).
  2. using a master switch statement that will call an object's based on an object's int ID
  3. using a pure virtual call to a base class

I never tried this with a basic CRTP pattern but the etl::function was supposed to be a variation on that where that was the mechanism used for the pattern. The time I got on MSVC and similar performance on an ARM Cortex M4 was

  1. etl : 400 million nanoseconds
  2. switch : 420 million nanoseconds
  3. virtual: 290 million nanoseconds

The pure virtual calls are significantly faster. Am I missing something or are virtual calls just not as bad as people make them out to be. Here is the code used for the tests.

 class testetlFunc
{
public:
    uint32_t a;

    testetlFunc() { a = 0; };

    void foo();
};

class testetlFunc2
{
public:
    uint32_t a;

    testetlFunc2() { a = 0; };

    virtual void foo() = 0;
};

void testetlFunc::foo()
{
    a++; 
}


class testetlFuncDerived : public testetlFunc2
{
public:
    testetlFuncDerived(); 

    void foo() override;
};

testetlFuncDerived::testetlFuncDerived()
{ 
}

void testetlFuncDerived::foo()
{
    a++; 
}


etl::ifunction<void>* timer1_callback1;
etl::ifunction<void>* timer1_callback2;
etl::ifunction<void>* timer1_callback3;
etl::ifunction<void>* timer1_callback4;
etl::ifunction<void>* etlcallbacks[4];

testetlFunc ttt;
testetlFunc ttt2;
testetlFunc ttt3;
testetlFunc ttt4;
testetlFuncDerived tttd1;
testetlFuncDerived tttd2;
testetlFuncDerived tttd3;
testetlFuncDerived tttd4;
testetlFunc2* tttarr[4];

static void MasterCallingFunction(uint16_t ID) {
    switch (ID)
    {
    case 1:
        ttt.foo();
        break;
    case 2:
        ttt2.foo();
        break;
    case 3:
        ttt3.foo();
        break;
    case 4:
        ttt4.foo();
        break;
    default:
        break;
    }
};






int main()
{

    tttarr[0] = (testetlFunc2*)&tttd1;
    tttarr[1] = (testetlFunc2*)&tttd2;
    tttarr[2] = (testetlFunc2*)&tttd3;
    tttarr[3] = (testetlFunc2*)&tttd4;

    etl::function_imv<testetlFunc, ttt, &testetlFunc::foo> k;
    timer1_callback1 = &k;
    etl::function_imv<testetlFunc, ttt2, &testetlFunc::foo> k2;
    timer1_callback2 = &k2;
    etl::function_imv<testetlFunc, ttt3, &testetlFunc::foo> k3;
    timer1_callback3 = &k3;
    etl::function_imv<testetlFunc, ttt4, &testetlFunc::foo> k4;
    timer1_callback4 = &k4;
etlcallbacks[0] = timer1_callback1;
    etlcallbacks[1] = timer1_callback2;
    etlcallbacks[2] = timer1_callback3;
    etlcallbacks[3] = timer1_callback4;

    //results for etl::function --------------
    int rng;
    srand(time(0));
    StartTimer(1)
    for (uint32_t i = 0; i < 2000000; i++)
    {
        rng = rand() % 4 + 0;
        for (uint16_t j= 0; j < 4; j++)
        {
            (*etlcallbacks[rng])();
        }
    }
    StopTimer(1)

    //results for switch --------------
    StartTimer(2)
    for (uint32_t i = 0; i < 2000000; i++)
    {
        rng = rand() % 4 + 0;
        for (uint16_t j = 0; j < 4; j++)
        {
            MasterCallingFunction(rng);
        }
    }
    StopTimer(2)
        //results for virtual vtable --------------
        StartTimer(3)
        for (uint32_t i = 0; i < 2000000; i++)
        {
            rng = rand() % 4 + 0;
            for (uint16_t j = 0; j < 4; j++)
            {
                tttarr[rng]->foo();
                //ttt.foo();
            }
        }
    StopTimer(3)
PrintAllTimerDuration
}
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  • Try with some more complex and slightly different foo() virtual versions – Ripi2 Jul 21 '19 at 17:00
  • In this simple example I would expect the compiler to be able to devirtualize the calls in an optimized build, so you don't actually pay for them at all. And if it can't, marking the derived classes final might help it do so. – Jesper Juhl Jul 21 '19 at 17:00
  • I tried your suggesting by doing class testetlFuncDerived final : public testetlFunc2 and I added more complexity to foo() but Im still getting similar performances. – Hadi Jaber Jul 21 '19 at 17:06
  • If the code is too simple the CPU branch prediction may be the key of performance. With data bigger than the L1/L2/L3 cache and complex virtual heritage, things may change. – Ripi2 Jul 21 '19 at 17:33
  • You can't benchmark it on a PC, that's meaningless. Cross compile for the relevant embedded system, then look at the disassemble. Benchmark with an oscilloscope, not with simulators. – Lundin Jul 21 '19 at 22:23
8

If what you really need is virtual dispatch, C++'s virtual calls are probably the most performant implementation you can get, and you should use them. Scores of compiler engineers have worked on optimizing them to the best performance they could get.

The reason behind people saying to avoid virtual methods is in my experience for when you do not need them. Avoid the virtual keyword on methods that can be statically dispatched, and on hot spots in your code.

Every time you call an object's virtual method, what happens is that the object's v-table is accessed (likely screwing up memory locality and flushing a cache or two), then a pointer is de-referenced to get at the actual function address, and then the actual function call happens. This is only fractions of a second slower, but if you're fractions slower enough times in a loop, it suddenly makes a difference.

When you call a static method, none of the earlier operations happen. The actual function call just happens. If the function that calls and the one that is called are close to each other in memory, all caches can stay the way they are.

So, avoid virtual dispatch in high-performance or low-CPU-power situations in tight loops (you can for example switch on a member variable and call a method that contains the entire loop instead).

But there is the saying "premature optimization is the root of all evil". Measure performance beforehand. "Embedded" CPUs have become much faster and more powerful than those a few years ago. Compilers for popular CPUs are better optimized than ones only just adapted to a new or exotic CPU. It may simply be that your compiler has an optimizer that alleviates any problems, or that your CPU is similar enough to a common desktop CPU to reap the benefits of work done for more popular CPUs.

Or you may have more RAM etc. than the people who told you to avoid virtual calls.

So, profile, and if the profiler says it's fine, it's fine. Also make sure your tests are representative. Your test code may just be written in a way that a network request coming in pre-empted the switch statement and made it seem slower than it really was, or that the virtual method calls were benefiting from the cache loaded by the non-virtual calls.

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