2

I'm relatively new to haskell so forgive me if this is really obvious.

Basically I have two Bool and based on them I want to choose the implementation of 3 different functions. In the case that both bools are equal (e.g. both True or both False) the functions should do nothing. Then there are different implementation if one or the other Bool is True.

These function involve constraints so for instance the first function has an Ord or Bounded constraint on the parameters. The second function has a Num constraint on the parameters.

The problem I am having is that I have no clue how to make the type checker oke with this construct. See below for a minimal example that complains when I pattern match on the result:

f :: (Ord a, Bounded a) => a -> a -> a
f a b = if a > b then maxBound else minBound

g :: (Ord a, Bounded a) => a -> a -> a
g a b = if a > b then minBound else maxBound

a = True
b = False

test
  | a == b = (const, const, const)
  | a      = (f, (-), (+))
  | b      = (g, (+), (-))

(resF, _, _) = test

(_, resG, _) = test -- error  Could not deduce (Ord b0) arising from a use of ‘test’
                    -- from the context: Num b
                    -- Same error occurs for the last value in the tuple.

I'm not sure how the function with the most constraints resF is completely fine with being assigned to a variable but resG complains...

Any help is appreciated!

3
  • 1
    I'm unsure, but this looks as a consequence of the Monomorphism Restriction. Start by adding explicit type annotations for top-level bindings, including test, resF, and resG, and see if the error becomes more clear.
    – chi
    Jul 21 '19 at 22:49
  • 1
    @chi It's not a consequence of the monomorphism restriction, as it still occurs when compiling with -XNoMonomorphismRestriction. Jul 22 '19 at 0:46
  • @DamianLattenero It's actually impossible to achieve this. So it doesn't solve the issue. It's a limitation of GHC
    – John Smith
    Jul 22 '19 at 20:15
5

TL;DR version: Because GHC will default Num b2 and Num b3 but not (Ord b1, Bounded b1).

This is an issue with type defaulting. The type of test is inferred to be (Ord b1, Bounded b1, Num b2, Num b3) => (b1 -> b1 -> b1, b2 -> b2 -> b2, b3 -> b3 -> b3). This type means that if you provide an Ord and Bounded instance for some type b1, and a Num instance for some types b2 and b3, you'll get a tuple of functions. When you take the tuple apart and only keep one piece, the other constraints don't just go away, so you basically have resF :: (Ord b1, Bounded b1, Num b2, Num b3) => b1 -> b1 -> b1 and resG :: (Ord b1, Bounded b1, Num b2, Num b3) => b2 -> b2 -> b2.

Now, in resF, b2 and b3 are ambiguous types, since they're used on the left of => but not on the right. According to the type defaulting rules, these will be defaulted to Integer, so you end up with resF really having a type of (Ord b1, Bounded b1) => b1 -> b1 -> b1 and things work fine.

resG is different. In it, b1 and b3 are the ambiguous types. b3 gets defaulted to Integer just like it did for resF. However, GHC doesn't have a default for b1 that will satisfy the constraint (Ord b1, Bounded b1), so it gives you an error to that effect (which could definitely be more clear).

To fix the problem, you need to tell GHC what type b1 would be. Since the piece of the tuple you're keeping doesn't use b1, you can choose whatever you want and it won't matter. Here's one way of doing that (in this example, I chose Int):

(_, resG, _) = test :: (Num b2, Num b3) => (Int -> Int -> Int, b2 -> b2 -> b2, b3 -> b3 -> b3)
3
  • All right this is clear. Is there a way to keep the polymorphic type of each function the tuple? The reason I want this is that I want to apply each function to different types which satisfy the constraints.
    – John Smith
    Jul 22 '19 at 11:31
  • @JohnSmith The only part that I made monomorphic in my fix got discarded by the first _. The resG function is still fully polymorphic. Jul 22 '19 at 12:56
  • 1
    Yes that is true. However what I really want to do is assign on three functions (resF, resG, resH). This fails.
    – John Smith
    Jul 22 '19 at 13:01
4

The problem here is that you have an ambiguous type. Firstly, let’s check the type signature of test as inferred by GHC. A neat trick I discovered a while ago is to add test :: _ to your program and let GHC give us its inferred type in an error message:

so.hs:13:9: error:
    • Found type wildcard ‘_’
        standing for ‘(b0 -> b0 -> b0, Integer -> Integer -> Integer,
                       Integer -> Integer -> Integer)’
      Where: ‘b0’ is an ambiguous type variable
      To use the inferred type, enable PartialTypeSignatures
    • In the type signature: test :: _
   |
13 | test :: _
   |         ^

So the type of test as inferred by GHC is (b0 -> b0 -> b0, Integer -> Integer -> Integer, Integer -> Integer -> Integer) (although there should be an additional (Ord b0, Bounded b0) constraint which GHC leaves out for some reason). Now, let’s look at resF and resG:

(resF, _, _) = test
(_, resG, _) = test

In the definition of resF, the b0 type parameter ends up being used outside that expression as well (in the type of resF :: b0 -> b0 -> b0), so it isn’t ambiguous. However, in the definition of resG, b0 is only ever used inside that expression, so it could be anything! Since GHC has absolutely no way to determine what b0 is in that declaration, it is marked as ambiguous, producing this error.

(If that wasn’t clear enough, the idea is that if you have an expression with an ambiguous type variable, and you refer to this variable on the left side of the =, then it becomes disambiguated, as the variable is being used outside the expression. I know this isn’t a very good explanation; I’m not too good with this area of Haskell myself, so if anyone else has a better explanation please comment!)

So how can this problem be solved? One way is simply to combine resF and resG, so b0 does end up being used outside test:

(resF, resG, _) = test

Another way is to add a type signature restricting b0:

(_, resG, _) = test :: (() -> () -> (), Integer -> Integer -> Integer, Integer -> Integer -> Integer)

This is the most common way of getting around ambiguous type errors, as it will work in all circumstances. In this case it happens to be much longer, but you should be able to use it in more situations than the above technique, which really only works here.


However, there’s still a few subtle points here. Firstly, why does GHC report that the second and third fields use Integer, instead of allowing any type? This is due to the monomorphism restriction, which in certain situations specialises type variables automatically. You can get around this by adding a type signature:

test :: (Ord a, Bounded a, Num b, Num c) => (a -> a -> a, b -> b -> b, c -> c -> c)

This is why it is considered good practise to add type signatures to all functions!

Of course, this has the disadvantage of making the second and third fields use type variables as well; hence, they become prone to ambiguous types as well. You can get around this by binding all three fields to allow these type variables to ‘propagate’ in a sense outside that declaration:

(resF, resG, resH) = test

(Note that ‘propagate’ is my own term, not a recognised Haskell term!)

EDIT: So, it turns out this strategy doesn’t work. More details are given at the end of this answer, since it’s a bit detailed.

Or you can add a type signature again to restrict b and c:

(resF, _, _) = test :: (Ord a, Bounded a) => (a -> a -> a, Int -> Int -> Int, Int -> Int -> Int)

The other point I wanted to make is with the definition of `test` itself. In Haskell, it is very uncommon to use global variables as you do here; usually you would add them as parameters to `test`, then pass them in from outside like this:
test :: (Ord a, Bounded a, Num b, Num c)
     => Bool
     -> Bool
     -> (a -> a -> a, b -> b -> b, c -> c -> c)
test a b =
  | a == b = (const, const, const)
  | a      = (f, (-), (+))
  | b      = (g, (+), (-))

(resF, resG, resH) = test True False

Doing it this way allows for greater reuse of code, as test can now be used multiple times with different boolean conditions.

EDIT:

Limitations of polymorphic tuples

I’m not sure the above is incorrect as such, but there’s an important factor which I completely missed. If you have something of type (Constr1 a, Constr2 b) => (a, b), the entire tuple depends on both Constr1 a and Constr2 b! So you can’t easily remove one type variable to isolate the other. (More details in this excellent answer.)

However, there is a solution! In test, each field is independent of each other. So it should theoretically be possible to change the type to the following:

test :: Bool -> Bool
     -> ( forall a. (Ord a, Bouded a) => a -> a -> a
        , forall b. Num b => b -> b -> b
        , forall c. Num c => c -> c -> c
        )
test a b =
  | a == b = (const, const, const)
  | a      = (f, (-), (+))
  | b      = (g, (+), (-))

Now all the constraints have in a sense been ‘pulled into’ the tuple, so you can now isolate one field.

Of course, nothing is ever quite as simple as that, and if you try running the above you run into an error about ‘impredicative polymorphism’. The solutions is wrapping the fields in auxilliary data types:

newtype Wrapper1 = Wrapper1 (forall a. (Ord a, Bounded a) => a -> a -> a)
newtype Wrapper2 = Wrapper2 (forall b. Num b => b -> b -> b)

test :: (Wrapper1, Wrapper2, Wrapper2)
test
  | a == b = (Wrapper1 const, Wrapper2 const, Wrapper2 const)
  | a      = (Wrapper1 f    , Wrapper2 (-)  , Wrapper2 (+))
  | b      = (Wrapper1 g    , Wrapper2 (+)  , Wrapper2 (-))

(Wrapper1 resF, Wrapper2 resG, Wrapper2 resH) = test

(You’ll also need to add {-# LANGUAGE RankNTypes #-} to the beginning of the file to get this to compile.)

And this — finally! — typechecks successfully.


As a further upside, it turns out that this method even gets rid of ambiguous type errors. The following code typechecks successfully as well:
test
  | a == b = (Wrapper1 const, Wrapper2 const, Wrapper2 const)
  | a      = (Wrapper1 f    , Wrapper2 (-)  , Wrapper2 (+))
  | b      = (Wrapper1 g    , Wrapper2 (+)  , Wrapper2 (-))

(Wrapper1 resF, _, _) = test

As I mentioned above, I don’t understand ambiguous types too well, but the reason for this is probably because all the information about other type variables has been ‘pulled into’ the other fields of the tuple, so GHC knows it can safely ignore them now.

7
  • Thank ouf or your answer! I tried to do (resF, resG, resH) = test however the same errors appear.
    – John Smith
    Jul 22 '19 at 11:36
  • Sorry @JohnSmith, looks like I forgot my own answer and left out the type signature! Editing now.
    – bradrn
    Jul 22 '19 at 11:45
  • @JohnSmith It looks like I’m still getting this error even when I add type signatures. This problem is more interesting than I thought! But it could take a while before I figure out a solution…
    – bradrn
    Jul 22 '19 at 11:49
  • @JohnSmith I give up — the behaviour I’m running into is so bizarre that I’m actually going to ask this as another question. I’ll comment here when I create it.
    – bradrn
    Jul 22 '19 at 12:09
  • @JohnSmith I’ve asked at stackoverflow.com/questions/57146115/…
    – bradrn
    Jul 22 '19 at 12:31
0

One way the error says that it cannot deduce which kind of a because it is ambiguous the type of the typeclass Num in the functions (+) and (-), to solve this problem you have to specify which one, neither the instance of Ord, Bounded or the instance of Num:

f :: (Ord a, Bounded a) => a -> a -> a
f a b = if a > b then maxBound else minBound

g :: (Ord a, Bounded a) => a -> a -> a
g a b = if a > b then minBound else maxBound

b1 = True
b2 = False


test a b | a == b = (const, const, const)
         | a      = (f , (-), (+))
         | b      = (g , (+), (-))


(resF, resG , plusH)  = test b1 b2 

three = 3 :: Int
two   = 2 :: Int 
one   = 1 :: Int
main = do
  putStrLn $ "Max: " ++ show (resF three two)
  putStrLn $ "Min: " ++ show (resF one two)
  putStrLn $ "2 - 1: " ++ show (resG two one)
  putStrLn $ "1 + 2: " ++ show (plusH one two)

λ> Max: 9223372036854775807
λ> Min: -9223372036854775808
λ> 2 - 1: 1
λ> 1 + 2: 3

So far, so good, I fixed it by giving the types to the functions resF, resG , plusH with the typed numbers three, two, one :: Int, even you can do:

(resF, _ , _)  = test b1 b2 

And also will work just fine.

Now the problem is when you do:

(_, resG', _)    = test b1 b2

-----^ ^----- (Problem!!!) With the main, the resG' will work just fine, because it is typed by three, two, one Int values, but _ values are not typed! three = 3 :: Int two = 2 :: Int one = 1 :: Int main = do putStrLn $ "2 - 1: " ++ show (resG' two one)

what's the type of _ there? and the other _, they are not specified, and that's the main problem you have

So a workaround for that is the next:

test a b | a == b = (const, const, const)
         | a      = (f , (-), (+))
         | b      = (g , (+), (-))


type NoneTypedFunction = () -> () -> () -- this type is in case you don't actually want / need the function from the first ternary value

(resF, resG , resH) = test b1 b2 
(_, resG', _)       = test b1 b2 :: (NoneTypedFunction, Int -> Int -> Int, Int -> Int -> Int) 
(_, _, _)           = test b1 b1 :: (NoneTypedFunction, Int -> Int -> Int, Int -> Int -> Int) 


three = 3 :: Int
two   = 2 :: Int 
one   = 1 :: Int
main = do
  putStrLn $ "Max: " ++ show (resF three two)
  putStrLn $ "Min: " ++ show (resF one two)
  putStrLn $ "2 - 1: " ++ show (resG two one)
  putStrLn $ "2 - 1: " ++ show (resH two one)
  putStrLn $ "2 - 1: " ++ show (resG' two one)

Now you give the correct type to each one

another importan thing

:t resF
resF :: Int -> Int -> Int

:t resG
resG :: Int -> Int -> Int

resG :: Int -> Int -> Int
:t resH

The types in the functions, after call test and giving a specific time for the first time, are fixed, and not polymorphic anymore.

If you want to be unbounded:

first (a, _,  _)  = a
second (_, b, _   = b
third (a, b, c)   = c

and then you can do:

(first (test b1 b2)) one two

$> -9223372036854775808

(first (test b1 b2)) True False
$> True

(first (test b1 b2)) 'c' 'b'
$> '\1114111'

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