829

All I want to do is to check whether an element exists in the vector or not, so I can deal with each case.

if ( item_present )
   do_this();
else
   do_that();
6
  • 3
    searching in a vector is very slow since you have to look at every single element of the vector so consider using a map if you're doing a lot of lookups
    – naumcho
    Commented Feb 20, 2009 at 22:31
  • 8
    @naumcho: If the vector is sorted there's always binary search, as posted below. This makes it as fast as a map and if you're only storing values (not key/value maps) then it's going to use a lot less memory.
    – Adam Hawes
    Commented Feb 21, 2009 at 1:01
  • 6
    maps are certainly not the best choice, but using set might be useful. If you need O(1) lookup time, hash_set is the way to go.
    – Philipp
    Commented Oct 8, 2010 at 8:58
  • 1
    If you're going to search multiple times for different numbers, a hash table would be more efficient.
    – NL628
    Commented Nov 25, 2017 at 2:26
  • 1
    The answer(s) to this question do not match the title. I strongly suggest to change the title so that people who seek the answers given will find them. It is not the fault of the person who asked the question of course, but now we have this situation... The most upvoted (and accepted) answers find the element anyway (and then check if they found it). So a better title would be "How to find an item in a std::vector, if it exists?" Or something like that.
    – Carlo Wood
    Commented Feb 11, 2022 at 19:09

21 Answers 21

1220

You can use std::find from <algorithm>:

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
vector<int> vec; 
//can have other data types instead of int but must same datatype as item 
std::find(vec.begin(), vec.end(), item) != vec.end()

This returns an iterator to the first element found. If not present, it returns an iterator to one-past-the-last. With your example:

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

if ( std::find(vec.begin(), vec.end(), item) != vec.end() )
   do_this();
else
   do_that();
34
  • 241
    I don't see how count() could be faster than find(), since find() stops as soon as one element is found, while count() always has to scan the whole sequence. Commented Feb 21, 2009 at 3:29
  • 130
    Don't forget to #include <algorithm> or else you might get very strange errors like 'can't find matching function in namespace std'
    – rustyx
    Commented Mar 2, 2012 at 15:46
  • 114
    Has it not bothered anyone that despite the STL being "object-oriented", .find() is still not a member function of std::vector, as you'd expect it should be? I wonder if this is somehow a consequence of templating.
    – bobobobo
    Commented Dec 7, 2012 at 2:33
  • 90
    @bobobobo: OOP has nothing to do with members vs. non-members. And there is a widespread school of thought that if something does not have to be a member, or when it does not give any advantage when implemented as a member, than it should not be a member; std::vector<>::find() would not give any advantage, nor is it needed, therefore, no, it should not be a member. See also en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coupling_%28computer_programming%29 Commented Feb 4, 2013 at 13:54
  • 81
    @phresnel I would argue that "when it does not give any advantage when implemented as a member" is false for this case. The advantage being a simplified and clearer interface. For example: mvec.find(key) != mvec.cend() is preferable to std::find(mvec.cbegin(), mvec.cend(), key) != mvec.cend().
    – swalog
    Commented Apr 29, 2015 at 20:09
139

As others have said, use the STL find or find_if functions. But if you are searching in very large vectors and this impacts performance, you may want to sort your vector and then use the binary_search, lower_bound, or upper_bound algorithms.

6
  • 3
    Good answer! Find is always o(n). lower_bound is o(log(n)) if used with random-access iterators. Commented Jul 8, 2009 at 19:54
  • 55
    Sorting is O(nlogn) though, so it's worth only if you're doing more than O(logn) searches.
    – liori
    Commented Jun 15, 2014 at 0:48
  • 12
    @liori True it depends on your usage patterns. If you only need to sort it once, then repeatedly do many searches it can save you.
    – Brian Neal
    Commented Jun 17, 2014 at 16:24
  • 1
    @Brian Neal, sorting a large vector is worth if there has to be many element searches on it. Sorting will be O(nlogn) and O(n) will be better if one has to find an element only once :)
    – Swapnil B.
    Commented Mar 11, 2018 at 18:17
  • 1
    Try to use std::set<> together with find() indeed. Or use std::map<> depending on your needs. Commented May 9, 2023 at 20:04
60

If your vector is not ordered, use the approach MSN suggested:

if(std::find(vector.begin(), vector.end(), item)!=vector.end()){
      // Found the item
}

If your vector is ordered, use binary_search method Brian Neal suggested:

if(binary_search(vector.begin(), vector.end(), item)){
     // Found the item
}

binary search yields O(log n) worst-case performance, which is way more efficient than the first approach. In order to use binary search, you may use qsort to sort the vector first to guarantee it is ordered.

3
  • 4
    Don't you mean std::sort? qsort is very inefficient on vectors.... see: stackoverflow.com/questions/12308243/… Commented Aug 16, 2013 at 1:57
  • 1
    Binary search will perform better for larger containers, but for small containers a simple linear search is likely to be as fast, or faster.
    – BillT
    Commented Mar 31, 2017 at 14:07
  • @BillT: Wouldn't a decent binary search implementation switch itself to linear search below some threshold number of elements?
    – einpoklum
    Commented Jan 9, 2022 at 21:40
54

Use find from the algorithm header of stl.I've illustrated its use with int type. You can use any type you like as long as you can compare for equality (overload == if you need to for your custom class).

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;
int main()
{   
    typedef vector<int> IntContainer;
    typedef IntContainer::iterator IntIterator;

    IntContainer vw;

    //...

    // find 5
    IntIterator i = find(vw.begin(), vw.end(), 5);

    if (i != vw.end()) {
        // found it
    } else {
        // doesn't exist
    }

    return 0;
}
2
  • 2
    Depending on the OP's needs, find_if() could also be appropriate. It allows to search using an arbitrary predicate instead of equality. Commented Feb 20, 2009 at 22:12
  • Oops, saw your comment too late. The answer I gave also mentions find_if.
    – Frank
    Commented Feb 20, 2009 at 22:19
30

In C++11 you can use any_of. For example if it is a vector<string> v; then:

if (any_of(v.begin(), v.end(), bind(equal_to<string>(), _1, item)))
   do_this();
else
   do_that();

Alternatively, use a lambda:

if (any_of(v.begin(), v.end(), [&](const std::string& elem) { return elem == item; }))
   do_this();
else
   do_that();
7
  • 2
    bind1st and bind2nd are deprecated since C++11 and completely removed in C++17. Use bind with placeholders and/or lambdas instead.
    – andreee
    Commented Apr 30, 2019 at 7:50
  • 5
    Why use std::any_of() when we have std::find()?
    – einpoklum
    Commented Jan 9, 2022 at 21:34
  • 2
    If the purpose is to check for membership only, why use std::find() when we have std::any_of?
    – Bex
    Commented Mar 25, 2022 at 9:30
  • 1
    @einpoklum std::find is only for C++20. Not all projects are using C++20 already. Don't think that's that easy to migrate big professional projects from one version to another. Believe me.
    – Maf
    Commented Feb 10, 2023 at 6:20
  • 1
    @Maf: Fair point, I was under the illusion it was older.
    – einpoklum
    Commented Feb 10, 2023 at 12:19
24

I use something like this...

#include <algorithm>


template <typename T> 
const bool Contains( std::vector<T>& Vec, const T& Element ) 
{
    if (std::find(Vec.begin(), Vec.end(), Element) != Vec.end())
        return true;

    return false;
}

if (Contains(vector,item))
   blah
else
   blah

...as that way it's actually clear and readable. (Obviously you can reuse the template in multiple places).

3
  • and you can make it work for lists or vectors by using 2 typenames Commented Mar 3, 2015 at 15:36
  • @ErikAronesty you can get away with 1 template argument if you use value_type from the container for the element type. I've added an answer like this.
    – user325117
    Commented Feb 11, 2016 at 21:40
  • 7
    You are basically writing : if true return true else return false. The method can be one lined in : return std::find(Vec.begin(), Vec.end(), Element) != Vec.end(); Commented Oct 8, 2020 at 7:52
16

In C++23 we finally have the most obvious solution:

if (std::ranges::contains(vec, item))
   do_this();
else
   do_that();
1
  • 1
    Yeah - finally. Such a shame that the committee has been so resistant for so long to people suggesting we need just a "has" or "contains" function for containers. std::map only got contains with C++20, and no love for vector. Commented Sep 29, 2023 at 19:16
15

Here's a function that will work for any Container:

template <class Container> 
const bool contains(const Container& container, const typename Container::value_type& element) 
{
    return std::find(container.begin(), container.end(), element) != container.end();
}

Note that you can get away with 1 template parameter because you can extract the value_type from the Container. You need the typename because Container::value_type is a dependent name.

3
  • 5
    Note that this is sometimes a bit too broad - it'd work for std::set for example, but give terrible performance compared to the find() member function. I've found it best to add a specialisation for containers with a faster search (set/map, unordered_*) Commented Nov 2, 2016 at 12:01
  • 1
    Maybe one day they'll finally add this to the stdlib... instead of people having to ask how to reinvent such a tiny wheel over and over again. It's totally viable now that in C++20 we have ranges, so that could just be called Range rather than Container, and Bob's your uncle. Commented Jul 1, 2020 at 16:06
  • What do you think about @PascalLaferrière 's approach of deducing the value type?
    – einpoklum
    Commented Jan 9, 2022 at 21:39
15

From C++20, using ranges (#include <ranges>)

    //SAMPLE DATA
    std::vector<int> vecOfElements = { 2,4,6,8 };

    //DO SOMETHING IF 8 IN VECTOR
    if (std::ranges::find(vecOfElements, 8) != vecOfElements.end())
    {
        std::cout << "DO SOMETHING" << std::endl;
    }
11

Bear in mind that, if you're going to be doing a lot of lookups, there are STL containers that are better for that. I don't know what your application is, but associative containers like std::map may be worth considering.

std::vector is the container of choice unless you have a reason for another, and lookups by value can be such a reason.

1
  • Even with lookups by value the vector can be a good choice, as long as it is sorted and you use binary_search, lower_bound or upper_bound. If the contents of the container changes between lookups, vector is not very good because of the need to sort again. Commented Feb 20, 2009 at 22:49
11

With boost you can use any_of_equal:

#include <boost/algorithm/cxx11/any_of.hpp>

bool item_present = boost::algorithm::any_of_equal(vector, element);
9

Use the STL find function.

Keep in mind that there is also a find_if function, which you can use if your search is more complex, i.e. if you're not just looking for an element, but, for example, want see if there is an element that fulfills a certain condition, for example, a string that starts with "abc". (find_if would give you an iterator that points to the first such element).

6

You can try this code:

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

// You can use class, struct or primitive data type for Item
struct Item {
    //Some fields
};
typedef std::vector<Item> ItemVector;
typedef ItemVector::iterator ItemIterator;
//...
ItemVector vtItem;
//... (init data for vtItem)
Item itemToFind;
//...

ItemIterator itemItr;
itemItr = std::find(vtItem.begin(), vtItem.end(), itemToFind);
if (itemItr != vtItem.end()) {
    // Item found
    // doThis()
}
else {
    // Item not found
    // doThat()
}
5

You can use the find function, found in the std namespace, ie std::find. You pass the std::find function the begin and end iterator from the vector you want to search, along with the element you're looking for and compare the resulting iterator to the end of the vector to see if they match or not.

std::find(vector.begin(), vector.end(), item) != vector.end()

You're also able to dereference that iterator and use it as normal, like any other iterator.

3

You can use count too. It will return the number of items present in a vector.

int t=count(vec.begin(),vec.end(),item);
1
  • 15
    find is faster than count, because it doesn't keep on counting after the first match. Commented Aug 16, 2015 at 20:27
3

I've personally used templates of late to handle multiple types of containers at once rather than deal only with vectors. I found a similar example online (can't remember where) so credit goes to whoever I've pilfered this from. This particular pattern seems to handle raw arrays as well.

template <typename Container, typename T = typename std::decay<decltype(*std::begin(std::declval<Container>()))>::type>
bool contains(Container && c, T v)
{
    return std::find(std::begin(c), std::end(c), v) != std::end(c);
}
2
  • Please consider separating the value-type-deduction logic into its own trait, e.g. template <typename Container> struct value_type { ... etc. ... }
    – einpoklum
    Commented Jan 9, 2022 at 21:36
  • @einpoklum I'm quite new to template logic and to be honest, I'm barely able to understand how this solution does its magic. Could you possible expand on the {...etc...}? Commented Feb 7, 2022 at 20:40
3
template <typename T> bool IsInVector(const T & what, const std::vector<T> & vec)
{
    return std::find(vec.begin(),vec.end(),what)!=vec.end();
}
2
  • If you want to adapt std::find() to be usable with containers, do it generically rather than for just a vector. And maybe call it find() or stdx::find() or something.
    – einpoklum
    Commented Jan 9, 2022 at 21:34
  • This function is a less useful wrapper than std::ranges::contains. Commented Jan 4 at 9:54
2

(C++17 and above):

can use std::search also

This is also useful for searching sequence of elements.

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

template <typename Container>
bool search_vector(const Container& vec, const Container& searchvec)
{
    return std::search(vec.begin(), vec.end(), searchvec.begin(), searchvec.end()) != vec.end();
}

int main()
{
     std::vector<int> v = {2,4,6,8};

     //THIS WORKS. SEARCHING ONLY ONE ELEMENT.
     std::vector<int> searchVector1 = {2};
     if(search_vector(v,searchVector1))
         std::cout<<"searchVector1 found"<<std::endl;
     else
         std::cout<<"searchVector1 not found"<<std::endl;

     //THIS WORKS, AS THE ELEMENTS ARE SEQUENTIAL.
     std::vector<int> searchVector2 = {6,8};
     if(search_vector(v,searchVector2))
         std::cout<<"searchVector2 found"<<std::endl;
     else
         std::cout<<"searchVector2 not found"<<std::endl;

     //THIS WILL NOT WORK, AS THE ELEMENTS ARE NOT SEQUENTIAL.
     std::vector<int> searchVector3 = {8,6};
     if(search_vector(v,searchVector3))
         std::cout<<"searchVector3 found"<<std::endl;
     else
         std::cout<<"searchVector3 not found"<<std::endl;
}

Also there is flexibility of passing some search algorithms. Refer here.

https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/algorithm/search

1
  • 2
    std::search is for searching for any of multiple values in a range; for a single value, there's no reason to use it.
    – einpoklum
    Commented Jan 9, 2022 at 21:38
0

If you wanna find a string in a vector:

struct isEqual
{
    isEqual(const std::string& s): m_s(s)
    {}

    bool operator()(OIDV* l)
    {
        return l->oid == m_s;
    }

    std::string m_s;
};

struct OIDV
{
    string oid;
//else
};

VecOidv::iterator itFind = find_if(vecOidv.begin(), vecOidv.end(), isEqual(szTmp));
1
  • 2
    std::find is just fine in this case, no need for the predicate object.
    – einpoklum
    Commented Jan 9, 2022 at 21:41
-1

Another way to do it is using std::count.

Example code:

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

void run_vector_contains_example() {
    std::vector<int> vec = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    int item_to_find = 3;

    int count = std::count(vec.begin(), vec.end(), item_to_find);

    if (count > 0) {
        // item found in vector
    } else {
        // item not found in vector
    }
}

Admittedly, this method might be slower than std::find when dealing with large vectors.

0
-1

How about this way?

   #include <iostream>
   #include <vector>
   #include <algorithm>

int main() {
std::vector<int> vec = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};

// Find element 3 in the vector
auto it = std::find(vec.begin(), vec.end(), 3);

// Check if element is found
if (it != vec.end()) {
    // Calculate index of the found element
    int index = std::distance(vec.begin(), it);
    std::cout << "Element 3 found at index: " << index << std::endl;
} else {
    std::cout << "Element 3 not found" << std::endl;
}

return 0;
}
1
  • It's not wrong, but this answer is rather pointless. The accepted answer already shows how to do it with std::find. Commented May 9 at 19:33

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