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I need to be able to write down 12-bit bitsets on the order of speed of around 1 millisecond per 10,000 bitsets. Basically I'm provided with data in 12-bit packages (bitsets, in this case) and I need to be able to store them (I've chosen to write them to a file, open to suggestions if other methods exist) within an incredibly small timespan.

Right now I've set up an example of a bitset array of size 10,000 (to simulate what I would actually get) and write them all down into a file

int main()
{

    std::bitset<12> map[10000];

    std::ofstream os("myfile.txt", std::ofstream::binary);
    //From here
    for (int i = 0; i < 10000; ++i)
    {
        os << map[i];
    }
    //to here takes slightly under 7 ms -- too slow
}

As the comments say, it takes 7 ms. I'm open to any and all speed improvements, and am hopeful to get (optimally) 1ms for that loop.

Edit Info: This is for a Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI), and the data will be all available, as it is in the example, then dumped all at once, not as a stream of bitsets. For more technical specs, I'm using an Arduino Atmega328p, ADS7816, and an SD card reader

  • 4
    What about putting it all in one buffer and do one write and let the OS and hardware deal with the rest? – Ted Lyngmo Jul 22 '19 at 21:06
  • 2
    You really do not want to use C++ streams in the critical path. I would suggest going with memory mapped files, they are likely to provide the best performance. – SergeyA Jul 22 '19 at 21:08
  • 1
    If you could change the file format, you could easily write 8x less data, and save time that way. – harold Jul 22 '19 at 21:10
  • Since it appears that the output gets written once, not read back (at least in this part of the code), simply doing a write() is probably sufficient, no memory-mapped file necessary. I agree with @TedLyngmo though, a single write will go tons faster than 10,000 separate writes, even with the buffering built into the stream. – phonetagger Jul 22 '19 at 21:10
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    You should post the compiler options you used to build your program. If you're timing an unoptimized or "debug" build, the timings you're showing us are meaningless. – PaulMcKenzie Jul 22 '19 at 22:05
2

Two recommendations:

  • Minimize trips to the OS. Write multiple bytes in one go.
  • Pack the bits before writing. Your current solution writes the bits as characters, i.e. one byte for every bit. Write in binary mode, which would be 8 times more compact (and also faster).
#include <bitset>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
    std::bitset<12> map[10000];

    // Initialize with demo values
    for (int i = 0; i < 10000; ++i) {
        map[i] = i + 1;
    }

    // Pack bits into a binary buffer
    std::vector<uint8_t> buffer((10000 * 12 + 7) / 8);
    for (int i = 0, j = 0, rem = 0; i < 10000; ++i) {
        unsigned long b = map[i].to_ulong();
        buffer[j++] |= static_cast<uint8_t>(b >> (4 + rem));
        buffer[j] |= static_cast<uint8_t>(b << (4 - rem));
        rem += 12 % 8;
        if (rem >= 8) {
            rem -= 8;
            j++;
        }
    }

    // Write the buffer in 1 go
    std::ofstream os("myfile.bin", std::ofstream::binary);
    os.write(reinterpret_cast<const char*>(buffer.data()), buffer.size());
    os.close(); // don't forget to close() to flush the file
}

If you prefer to keep your text file format, at least enable buffering:

int main()
{
    std::bitset<12> map[10000];

    // Enable buffering
    std::vector<char> buf(256 * 1024);
    std::ofstream os("myfile.txt", std::ofstream::binary);
    os.rdbuf()->pubsetbuf(buf.data(), buf.size());

    for (int i = 0; i < 10000; ++i)
    {
        os << map[i];
    }
    os.close(); // to flush the buffer
}
| improve this answer | |
  • I'd be tempted to try mapping std::bitset<12> map[10000]; to a uint16_t buffer[10000]; and seeing if that's fast enough. The long-term gains in lower future O&M from the vastly simpler code might be worth a small performance impact. I shudder to think what would happen should the std::bitset<12> ever need to grow to std::bitset<13> in a few years and the work be given to a new programmer if your first solution is the only one fast enough. – Andrew Henle Jul 23 '19 at 16:23

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