14

I'm in the middle of reading Effective Go, and there is a piece of code which I think is O(n) complexity yet it is O(n²). Why is this for range loop considered to be O(n²)?

It is found here (under #interfaces)

type Sequence []int
...
func (s Sequence) String() string {
    ...
    for i, elem := range s { // Loop is O(N²); will fix that in next example.
        if i > 0 {
            str += " "
        }
        str += fmt.Sprint(elem)
    }
    ...
}

The reason I think it is O(n) is because there is only one iteration over s, and the if statement and fmt.Sprint should not be in O(n) complexity.

3
  • 1
    I's not the Sequence traversal, which is O(n), but building the str piecemeal: on each += the str is copied anew with sufficient allocation of the free space at the end of the new memory block, and then the result of fmt.Sprintf(elem) is appended. That is O(n²) in terms of memory.
    – kostix
    Jul 23, 2019 at 11:45
  • 1
    In a reasonably up-to-date Go, use strings.Builder to carry out tasks like this.
    – kostix
    Jul 23, 2019 at 11:46
  • 1
    Thank you for answering and for suggesting a better replacement. Jul 23, 2019 at 11:51

1 Answer 1

15

Every time you concatenate str += fmt.Sprint(elem) you create a new String that has to transfer (copy) the characters of the prev str into the new one. In step 1 you copy 1 char, in step 2, 2, etc. This gives n(n+1)/2 copies. Hence the complexity is O(n^2).

1
  • Thank you, that answers it! Will mark this answer as correct shortly. Jul 23, 2019 at 11:49

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