1

When Android primary pattern was MVP we stored validation logic in presenters(because view should be dumb - correct me if I am wrong) as one presenter was only for one view. In MVVM ViewModel doesn't know about View which used this ViewModel and (as I understand) a ViewModel can be used by different Views without violating MVVM idea. So, the question is where to validate a login form in MVVM? What is the ideologically correct solution?

2
  • First, how are you validating the users? Do you have to get anything remotely? Is it all done locally?
    – Steven
    Jul 23 '19 at 15:38
  • @Steven I validate it locally(check if an email has @ sign and if password follows all the requirements). Jul 23 '19 at 15:43
2

First you should use two-way databinding and assign the text values to observable fields in the viewmodel and use a function like this

private fun validateFields(): Boolean {
        if (email.value.isNullOrBlank()) {

            return false
        }
        if (password.value.isNullOrBlank()) {

            return false
        }
        return true
    }

to validate your fields, you can add more levels of validation if you want to.

you can then attach the below function to the login button in your layout

 fun loginUser() {
        if (validateFields()) {
            val job = viewModelScope.launch(Dispatchers.IO) {
                result.postValue(
                    repo.makeLoginRequest(
                        email = email.value,
                        password = password.value
                    )
                )
           }

        }
    }

and use the result anyway you want to, here i am using livedata and coroutines

to check if email is valid use:

private fun isValidEmail(): Boolean = android.util.Patterns.EMAIL_ADDRESS.matcher(email.value).matches()
2
  • thank you for your answer. but I mean where I should place this validation logic. should it be in ViewModel or in View or anywhere else? because according to SRP principle view's only responsibility - is rendering., not validation Jul 23 '19 at 15:58
  • 1
    this should be in the viewmodel, all the logic above should be in the viewmodel, the view should only handle ui changes and display errormessages
    – petyr
    Jul 23 '19 at 16:02
2

I've seen many implementations of MVVM pattern in android. I follow below structure in my projects. I don't know if that's ideal or not. Correct me if am wrong.

First let me answer your questions,

where to validate a login form in MVVM ?

I do the validation in ViewModel

class LogInViewModel : ViewModel() {

    ...

    fun performValidation() {

        if (username.isBlank()) {
            logInResult.value = "Invalid username"
            return
        }

        if (password.isBlank()) {
            logInResult.value = "Invalid password"
            return
        }

        logInResult.value = "Valid credentials :)"
    }

}

What is the ideologically correct solution?

As I said, there are many structures we can follow to implement MVVM in android. Below given an example on how I do it. The code is filled with comments, so I believe it's self-understandable. Anyway, feel free to ask for any clarification in the comments. (For the sake of readability, I've removed some code from layout file)

screenshot

LogInViewModel

class LogInViewModel : ViewModel() {

    /**
     * Two way bind-able fields
     */
    var username: String = ""
    var password: String = ""

    /**
     * To pass login result to activity
     */
    private val logInResult = MutableLiveData<String>()

    fun getLogInResult(): LiveData<String> = logInResult

    /**
     * Called from activity on login button click
     */
    fun performValidation() {

        if (username.isBlank()) {
            logInResult.value = "Invalid username"
            return
        }

        if (password.isBlank()) {
            logInResult.value = "Invalid password"
            return
        }

        logInResult.value = "Valid credentials :)"
    }

}

LogInHandler

/**
 * To pass UI events to activity
 */
interface LogInHandler {

    /**
     * Will be called when login button gets clicked
     */
    fun onLogInClicked()
}

activity_login.xml

<layout>

    <data>

        <variable
            name="viewModel"
            type="com.theapache64.mvvmloginsample.LogInViewModel" />

        <variable
            name="handler"
            type="com.theapache64.mvvmloginsample.LogInHandler" />
    </data>

    <androidx.constraintlayout.widget.ConstraintLayout>

        <EditText
            ...
            android:text="@={viewModel.username}" <!--Two way binding username-->
        />

        <EditText
            ...
            android:text="@={viewModel.password}" <!--Two way binding password-->
        />

        <Button
            ...
            android:onClick="@{()->handler.onLogInClicked()}" <!--Invoked on button click-->
        />
    </androidx.constraintlayout.widget.ConstraintLayout>
</layout>

and finally the activity

LogInActivity

class LogInActivity : AppCompatActivity(), LogInHandler {

    private lateinit var viewModel: LogInViewModel

    override fun onCreate(savedInstanceState: Bundle?) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState)

        // Binding
        val binding =
            DataBindingUtil.setContentView<ActivityLoginBinding>(this, R.layout.activity_login)

        // ViewModel
        this.viewModel = ViewModelProviders.of(this).get(LogInViewModel::class.java)

        // Setting binding params
        binding.viewModel = viewModel
        binding.handler = this

        // Watching for login result
        viewModel.getLogInResult().observe(this, Observer { result ->
            Toast.makeText(this, result, Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show()
        })
    }

    override fun onLogInClicked() {
        viewModel.performValidation()
    }

}

I've hosted complete source code in GitHub. You can get it from here

1
  • 1
    I also perform validation in ViewModel but I was not sure if I am correct, so I decided to ask the community. Usually, I add the Validator interface(which has the method isValid(T)) and make subclasses per each entity. So, as I am not the only one who does validation in ViewModel I assume that I am correct. Jul 23 '19 at 16:41

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