162

Is there a way in JavaScript to check if a string is a URL?

RegExes are excluded because the URL is most likely written like stackoverflow; that is to say that it might not have a .com, www or http.

  • 13
    If it is missing the http, it is per default no url. – nfechner Apr 19 '11 at 13:29
  • 1
    @nfechner that is to say that if it doesn't specify a protocol and use the colon character (preferably with two forward slashes next) then it is not a URL? – jcolebrand Apr 19 '11 at 13:30
  • 4
    As you can read in the URL RFC, the only part actually neccessary to make a String a valid URL is the colon. Valid URLs look like: <scheme>:<scheme-specific-part> – nfechner Apr 19 '11 at 13:34
  • 1
    see stackoverflow.com/a/3975573/572180 – nguyên May 29 '13 at 1:30
  • 6
    How you test whether something is a URL is highly context-dependent and too vague without further qualification. Does it matter to you whether it conforms to the URL RFC spec, works when making an OS system call to open the URL, parses as an href in an anchor element, works when calling window.open(url), points to something that really exists, works in the browser location bar, or a combination of the above? You'll get very different answers depending on which of these you care about. – Roy Tinker Apr 18 '18 at 18:59

18 Answers 18

72

A related question with an answer:

Javascript regex URL matching

Or this Regexp from Devshed:

function validURL(str) {
  var pattern = new RegExp('^(https?:\\/\\/)?'+ // protocol
    '((([a-z\\d]([a-z\\d-]*[a-z\\d])*)\\.)+[a-z]{2,}|'+ // domain name
    '((\\d{1,3}\\.){3}\\d{1,3}))'+ // OR ip (v4) address
    '(\\:\\d+)?(\\/[-a-z\\d%_.~+]*)*'+ // port and path
    '(\\?[;&a-z\\d%_.~+=-]*)?'+ // query string
    '(\\#[-a-z\\d_]*)?$','i'); // fragment locator
  return !!pattern.test(str);
}
  • 2
    @Bruno: it's very likely that they are internally saved with separate titles and URLs, like { title: "Stackoverflow", uri: "http://stackoverflow.com" } Update: indeed, see code.google.com/chrome/extensions/bookmarks.html – Marcel Korpel Apr 19 '11 at 13:55
  • 10
    trying to use your example. But i am getting an error on firebug which saying invalid quantifier. Any idea? – Sisir Jul 10 '12 at 18:49
  • 121
    Function returns: SyntaxError: Invalid regular expression: /^(https?://)?((([a-zd]([a-zd-]*[a-zd])*).)+[a-z]{2,}|((d{1,3}.){3}d{1,3}))(:d+)?(/[-a-zd%_.~+]*)*(?[;&a-zd%_.~+=-]*)?(#[-a-zd_]*)?$/: Invalid group Google Chrome (Version 30.0.1599.101) (Mac OS X: 10.8.5) – dr.dimitru Oct 19 '13 at 13:37
  • 9
    Be aware that if you use a string as a parameter for the RegExp you have to double escape the backslashes - otherwise you get errors like invalid group. – Kjell Jun 5 '15 at 16:13
  • 2
    I get invalid group for google.com – Daniel Apt Oct 18 '16 at 10:15
159
function isURL(str) {
  var pattern = new RegExp('^(https?:\\/\\/)?'+ // protocol
  '((([a-z\\d]([a-z\\d-]*[a-z\\d])*)\\.?)+[a-z]{2,}|'+ // domain name
  '((\\d{1,3}\\.){3}\\d{1,3}))'+ // OR ip (v4) address
  '(\\:\\d+)?(\\/[-a-z\\d%_.~+]*)*'+ // port and path
  '(\\?[;&a-z\\d%_.~+=-]*)?'+ // query string
  '(\\#[-a-z\\d_]*)?$','i'); // fragment locator
  return pattern.test(str);
}
  • 21
    returns false for http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Procter_&_Gamble – Sorter Dec 14 '13 at 19:48
  • 9
    fails for google search image links : http://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&docid=nIv5rk2GyP3hXM&tbnid=isiOkMe3nCtexM:&ved=0CAUQjRw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fanimalcrossing.wikia.com%2Fwiki%2FLion&ei=ygZXU_2fGKbMsQTf4YLgAQ&bvm=bv.65177938,d.aWc&psig=AFQjCNEpBfKnal9kU7Zu4n7RnEt2nerN4g&ust=1398298682009707 – bill davis Apr 23 '14 at 0:23
  • 2
    this is unusable slow – Hernán Eche Jan 28 '15 at 3:00
  • 39
    It returns true for aaa. – alex naumov Dec 1 '16 at 9:13
  • 8
    Why this answer has 143 upvotes? – VicJordan Apr 17 '18 at 8:14
74

Rather than using a regular expression, I would recommend making use of an anchor element.

when you set the href property of an anchor, various other properties are set.

var parser = document.createElement('a');
parser.href = "http://example.com:3000/pathname/?search=test#hash";

parser.protocol; // => "http:"
parser.hostname; // => "example.com"
parser.port;     // => "3000"
parser.pathname; // => "/pathname/"
parser.search;   // => "?search=test"
parser.hash;     // => "#hash"
parser.host;     // => "example.com:3000"

source

However, if the value href is bound to is not a valid url, then the value of those auxiliary properties will be the empty string.

Edit: as pointed out in the comments: if an invalid url is used, the properties of the current URL may be substituted.

So, as long as you're not passing in the URL of the current page, you can do something like:

function isValidURL(str) {
   var a  = document.createElement('a');
   a.href = str;
   return (a.host && a.host != window.location.host);
}
  • 3
    This isn't the case (in Chrome 48 at least). If the url passed to a.href is invalid, parser.host returns the hostname of the page you're currently on, not the expected false. – Sam Beckham Feb 25 '16 at 15:37
  • 2
    Gah! that's weird. I swear I tested this! I think it's fair to say that this wont really ever have to be used ON the current page, so the conditional can just be changed. I'll edit the post. – Luke Feb 25 '16 at 22:48
  • it is not a very typical use case, but this technique does not work in the context of Firefox browser window (important for addon development) – chrmod May 15 '16 at 16:01
  • @SamBeckham This is definitely a concern when using this method, but I just want to point out that this isn't a special behavior. If you have a link on your page that's invalid, like <a href="invalidurl">, it does go to your domain. It gets added to the end of the current url. So Chrome is doing the correct thing by giving you the current hostname from the "parser" element. – yts Dec 14 '17 at 18:54
  • 3
    function isValidURL(str): so much better than using regex! Thank you! – Rodrigo Apr 13 '18 at 15:55
37

You can try to use URL constructor: if it doesn't throw, the string is a valid URL:

const isValidUrl = (string) => {
  try {
    new URL(string);
    return true;
  } catch (_) {
    return false;  
  }
}
  • This throws an exception for a string such as www.google.com indicating that this is not a valid URL, when it is a valid URL – AshD Apr 21 '17 at 1:04
  • 8
    @AshD no, it's not; e.g. you can't use as href attribute for <a>. Valid URL must begin with a scheme name, e.g. https://. – Pavlo Apr 21 '17 at 8:26
  • 2
    new URL('javascript:alert(23)') – user3560988 Oct 2 '17 at 15:47
  • 1
    @AshD Like Pavlo said, your comment isn't correct. Try using an anchor element to link to an external page... the url ends up like... (example.com/www.example.com) rather than going to (example.com). – jscul Oct 19 '17 at 18:19
  • 4
    @Pavlo this returns true isValidUrl("javascript:void(0)") – Praveena Nov 2 '17 at 3:55
26

To Validate Url using javascript is shown below

function ValidURL(str) {
  var regex = /(http|https):\/\/(\w+:{0,1}\w*)?(\S+)(:[0-9]+)?(\/|\/([\w#!:.?+=&%!\-\/]))?/;
  if(!regex .test(str)) {
    alert("Please enter valid URL.");
    return false;
  } else {
    return true;
  }
}
  • 2
    Several parts of the regex could vastly be reduced: a) (http|https) to (?:https?); b) :{0,1} to :?; c) [0-9] to \d – Dmitry Parzhitsky Mar 28 '17 at 14:52
20
+50

I am using below function to validate URL with or without http/https:

function isValidURL(string) {
  var res = string.match(/(http(s)?:\/\/.)?(www\.)?[-a-zA-Z0-9@:%._\+~#=]{2,256}\.[a-z]{2,6}\b([-a-zA-Z0-9@:%_\+.~#?&//=]*)/g);
  if (res == null)
    return false;
  else
    return true;
};

var testCase1 = "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Procter_&_Gamble";
console.log(isValidURL(testCase1)); // return true

var testCase2 = "http://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&docid=nIv5rk2GyP3hXM&tbnid=isiOkMe3nCtexM:&ved=0CAUQjRw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fanimalcrossing.wikia.com%2Fwiki%2FLion&ei=ygZXU_2fGKbMsQTf4YLgAQ&bvm=bv.65177938,d.aWc&psig=AFQjCNEpBfKnal9kU7Zu4n7RnEt2nerN4g&ust=1398298682009707";
console.log(isValidURL(testCase2)); // return true

var testCase3 = "https://sdfasd";
console.log(isValidURL(testCase3)); // return false

var testCase4 = "dfdsfdsfdfdsfsdfs";
console.log(isValidURL(testCase4)); // return false

var testCase5 = "magnet:?xt=urn:btih:123";
console.log(isValidURL(testCase5)); // return false

var testCase6 = "https://stackoverflow.com/";
console.log(isValidURL(testCase6)); // return true

var testCase7 = "https://w";
console.log(isValidURL(testCase7)); // return false

var testCase8 = "https://sdfasdp.ppppppppppp";
console.log(isValidURL(testCase8)); // return false

  • 1
    Seems a nice solution! Could you add some tests showing it works in some corner cases (see for example these comments)? – Basj Apr 16 '18 at 7:36
  • @Basj added test cases. Please check – VicJordan Apr 16 '18 at 8:00
  • Not bad, fails to pass http://⌘.ws or 142.42.1.1 and it allows http://.www.foo.bar./ but it doesn't hang like some of the other regex including the top rated answers. – aamarks Apr 16 '18 at 15:58
  • @aamarks then it deserve an upvote ;) – VicJordan Apr 17 '18 at 2:22
  • @aamarks I checked your answer. Your answer is failing for https://sdfasdp.ppppppppppp i.e. returning true but mine returns false which is expected I think. – VicJordan Apr 17 '18 at 2:23
20

Improvement on the accepted answer...

  • Check for ftp/ftps as protocol
  • Has double escaping for backslashes (\\)
  • Ensures that domains have a dot and an extension (.com .io .xyz)
  • Allows full colon (:) in the path e.g. http://thingiverse.com/download:1894343
  • Allows ampersand (&) in path e.g http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Procter_&_Gamble
  • Allows @ symbol in path e.g. https://medium.com/@techytimo

    isURL(str) {
      var pattern = new RegExp('^((ft|htt)ps?:\\/\\/)?'+ // protocol
      '((([a-z\\d]([a-z\\d-]*[a-z\\d])*)\\.)+[a-z]{2,}|'+ // domain name and extension
      '((\\d{1,3}\\.){3}\\d{1,3}))'+ // OR ip (v4) address
      '(\\:\\d+)?'+ // port
      '(\\/[-a-z\\d%@_.~+&:]*)*'+ // path
      '(\\?[;&a-z\\d%@_.,~+&:=-]*)?'+ // query string
      '(\\#[-a-z\\d_]*)?$','i'); // fragment locator
      return pattern.test(str);
    }
    
19

Rely on a library: https://www.npmjs.com/package/valid-url

import { isWebUri } from 'valid-url';
// ...
if (!isWebUri(url)) {
    return "Not a valid url.";
}
10

Here is yet another method.

var elm;
function isValidURL(u){
  if(!elm){
    elm = document.createElement('input');
    elm.setAttribute('type', 'url');
  }
  elm.value = u;
  return elm.validity.valid;
}

console.log(isValidURL('http://www.google.com/'));
console.log(isValidURL('//google.com'));
console.log(isValidURL('google.com'));
console.log(isValidURL('localhost:8000'));

  • Educational code! The mechanism here is probably identical to how new URL(string) in Pavlo's code works. Both tests have identical results with all the edge cases I tested. I like his code because it is simpler and doesn't involve creating elements, but yours is a few times faster (probably because it doesn't create the el after the first use). – aamarks Apr 23 '18 at 22:05
  • 1
    Thank you! I implemented your advice. Be aware however: Older browsers and/or mobile device WebView may have not implemented the <input type =url> element; thus the input value would be treated just like a regular text (no URL validation). REF: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTML/Element/input/url – Panini Luncher Dec 7 '18 at 15:17
8

(I don't have reps to comment on ValidURL example; hence post this as an answer.)

While use of protocol relative URLs is not encouraged (The Protocol-relative URL), they do get employed sometimes. To validate such an URL with a regular expression the protocol part could be optional, e.g.:

function isValidURL(str) {
    var pattern = new RegExp('^((https?:)?\\/\\/)?'+ // protocol
        '(?:\\S+(?::\\S*)?@)?' + // authentication
        '((([a-z\\d]([a-z\\d-]*[a-z\\d])*)\\.)+[a-z]{2,}|'+ // domain name
        '((\\d{1,3}\\.){3}\\d{1,3}))'+ // OR ip (v4) address
        '(\\:\\d+)?(\\/[-a-z\\d%_.~+]*)*'+ // port and path
        '(\\?[;&a-z\\d%_.~+=-]*)?'+ // query string
        '(\\#[-a-z\\d_]*)?$','i'); // fragment locater
    if (!pattern.test(str)) {
        return false;
    } else {
        return true;
    }
}

As others noted, regular expression does not seem to be the best suited approach for validating URLs, though.

  • I thought at first this was pretty good but it fails many of the tests at mathiasbynens.be/demo/url-regex, and then it hangs on isValidURL("https://d1f4470da51b49289906b3d6cbd65074@app.getsentry.com/13176") – aamarks Apr 23 '18 at 21:21
  • Yes, like I said, I merely commented on the protocol part. I added the authentication clause to handle @. It doesn't hang in my browsers. – ko la Apr 25 '18 at 3:23
  • Sorry, I was going through several of these to evaluate them and missed that yours was commenting on the given answer. I think your correction even helped me get started on these when I first visited this page. Not hanging now. – aamarks Apr 25 '18 at 4:42
5

I can't comment on the post that is the closest #5717133, but below is the way I figured out how to get @tom-gullen regex working.

/^(https?:\/\/)?((([a-z\d]([a-z\d-]*[a-z\d])*)\.)+[a-z]{2,}|((\d{1,3}\.){3}\d{1,3}))(\:\d+)?(\/[-a-z\d%_.~+]*)*(\?[;&a-z\d%_.~+=-]*)?(\#[-a-z\d_]*)?$/i
  • 1
    This worked for me but I needed to backslash the backslashes. var pattern = new RegExp('(https?:\\/\\/)?((([a-z\\d]([a-z\\d-]*[a-z\\d])*)\\.)+[a-z]{2,}|((\\d{1,3}\\.){3}\\d{1,3}))(\\:\\d+)?(\\/[-a-z\\d%_.~+]*)*(\\?[;&a-z\\d%_.~+=-]*)?(\\#[-a-z\\d_]*)?$', 'i'); – Fernando Chavez Herrera Jun 20 '16 at 21:29
  • false on localhost:8080 – roli roli May 15 '18 at 15:41
5

As has been noted the perfect regex is elusive but still seems to be a reasonable approach (alternatives are server side tests or the new experimental URL API). However the high ranking answers are often returning false for common URLs but even worse will freeze your app/page for minutes on even as simple a string as isURL('aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa'). It's been pointed out in some of the comments, but most probably haven't entered a bad value to see it. Hanging like that makes that code unusable in any serious application. I think it's due to the repeated case insensitive sets in code like ((([a-z\\d]([a-z\\d-]*[a-z\\d])*)\\.?)+[a-z]{2,}|' .... Take out the 'i' and it doesn't hang but will of course not work as desired. But even with the ignore case flag those tests reject high unicode values that are allowed.

The best already mentioned is:

function isURL(str) {
  return /^(?:\w+:)?\/\/([^\s\.]+\.\S{2}|localhost[\:?\d]*)\S*$/.test(str); 
}

That comes from Github segmentio/is-url. The good thing about a code repository is you can see the testing and any issues and also the test strings run through it. There's a branch that would allow strings missing protocol like google.com, though you're probably making too many assumptions then. The repository has been updated and I'm not planning on trying to keep up a mirror here. It's been broken up into separate tests to avoid RegEx redos which can be exploited for DOS attacks (I don't think you have to worry about that with client side js, but you do have to worry about your page hanging for so long that your visitor leaves your site).

There is one other repository I've seen that may even be better for isURL at dperini/regex-weburl.js, but it is highly complex. It has a bigger test list of valid and invalid URLs. The simple one above still passes all the positives and only fails to block a few odd negatives like http://a.b--c.de/ as well as the special ips.

Whichever you choose, run it through this function which I've adapted from the tests on dperini/regex-weburl.js, while using your browser's Developer Tools inpector.

function testIsURL() {
//should match
console.assert(isURL("http://foo.com/blah_blah"));
console.assert(isURL("http://foo.com/blah_blah/"));
console.assert(isURL("http://foo.com/blah_blah_(wikipedia)"));
console.assert(isURL("http://foo.com/blah_blah_(wikipedia)_(again)"));
console.assert(isURL("http://www.example.com/wpstyle/?p=364"));
console.assert(isURL("https://www.example.com/foo/?bar=baz&inga=42&quux"));
console.assert(isURL("http://✪df.ws/123"));
console.assert(isURL("http://userid:password@example.com:8080"));
console.assert(isURL("http://userid:password@example.com:8080/"));
console.assert(isURL("http://userid@example.com"));
console.assert(isURL("http://userid@example.com/"));
console.assert(isURL("http://userid@example.com:8080"));
console.assert(isURL("http://userid@example.com:8080/"));
console.assert(isURL("http://userid:password@example.com"));
console.assert(isURL("http://userid:password@example.com/"));
console.assert(isURL("http://142.42.1.1/"));
console.assert(isURL("http://142.42.1.1:8080/"));
console.assert(isURL("http://➡.ws/䨹"));
console.assert(isURL("http://⌘.ws"));
console.assert(isURL("http://⌘.ws/"));
console.assert(isURL("http://foo.com/blah_(wikipedia)#cite-1"));
console.assert(isURL("http://foo.com/blah_(wikipedia)_blah#cite-1"));
console.assert(isURL("http://foo.com/unicode_(✪)_in_parens"));
console.assert(isURL("http://foo.com/(something)?after=parens"));
console.assert(isURL("http://☺.damowmow.com/"));
console.assert(isURL("http://code.google.com/events/#&product=browser"));
console.assert(isURL("http://j.mp"));
console.assert(isURL("ftp://foo.bar/baz"));
console.assert(isURL("http://foo.bar/?q=Test%20URL-encoded%20stuff"));
console.assert(isURL("http://مثال.إختبار"));
console.assert(isURL("http://例子.测试"));
console.assert(isURL("http://उदाहरण.परीक्षा"));
console.assert(isURL("http://-.~_!$&'()*+,;=:%40:80%2f::::::@example.com"));
console.assert(isURL("http://1337.net"));
console.assert(isURL("http://a.b-c.de"));
console.assert(isURL("http://223.255.255.254"));
console.assert(isURL("postgres://u:p@example.com:5702/db"));
console.assert(isURL("https://d1f4470da51b49289906b3d6cbd65074@app.getsentry.com/13176"));

//SHOULD NOT MATCH:
console.assert(!isURL("http://"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://."));
console.assert(!isURL("http://.."));
console.assert(!isURL("http://../"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://?"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://??"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://??/"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://#"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://##"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://##/"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://foo.bar?q=Spaces should be encoded"));
console.assert(!isURL("//"));
console.assert(!isURL("//a"));
console.assert(!isURL("///a"));
console.assert(!isURL("///"));
console.assert(!isURL("http:///a"));
console.assert(!isURL("foo.com"));
console.assert(!isURL("rdar://1234"));
console.assert(!isURL("h://test"));
console.assert(!isURL("http:// shouldfail.com"));
console.assert(!isURL(":// should fail"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://foo.bar/foo(bar)baz quux"));
console.assert(!isURL("ftps://foo.bar/"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://-error-.invalid/"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://a.b--c.de/"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://-a.b.co"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://a.b-.co"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://0.0.0.0"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://10.1.1.0"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://10.1.1.255"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://224.1.1.1"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://1.1.1.1.1"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://123.123.123"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://3628126748"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://.www.foo.bar/"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://www.foo.bar./"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://.www.foo.bar./"));
console.assert(!isURL("http://10.1.1.1"));}

And then test that string of 'a's.

See this comparison of isURL regex by Mathias Bynens for more info before you post a seemingly great regex.

  • I checked your answer. Your answer is failing for sdfasdp.ppppppppppp i.e. returning true but expected is false – VicJordan Apr 17 '18 at 8:26
  • I think that's a valid URL, structurally. Not an expert on the standard but I don't think there's a limit on the length of the .com portion (I know .online is legit). – aamarks Apr 17 '18 at 22:12
  • I barely knew how to write a regex a couple of months ago. The problem is severe. Both of the regex I quoted can complete isURL('a'.repeat(100)) millions of times/sec (the more complex one from dperini is actually faster). Some of the high ranking answers of the form ([a-zA-Z]+)* would take hours to complete that once. Look up RegEx redos for more information. – aamarks Apr 23 '18 at 20:27
4

One function that I have been using to validate a URL "string" is:

var matcher = /^(?:\w+:)?\/\/([^\s\.]+\.\S{2}|localhost[\:?\d]*)\S*$/;

function isUrl(string){
  return matcher.test(string);
}

This function will return a boolean whether the string is a URL.

Examples:

isUrl("https://google.com");     // true
isUrl("http://google.com");      // true
isUrl("http://google.de");       // true
isUrl("//google.de");            // true
isUrl("google.de");              // false
isUrl("http://google.com");      // true
isUrl("http://localhost");       // true
isUrl("https://sdfasd");         // false
1

You can use the URL native API:

  const isUrl = string => {
      try { return Boolean(new URL(string)); }
      catch(e){ return false; }
  }
  • 1
    isUrl('https://w') returns true – Basj Apr 16 '18 at 7:38
  • 3
    Looks very similar to the answer provided by @pavlo, only variable names changed ;) – Munim Munna Apr 16 '18 at 21:28
  • 1
    there should really be a simple native method to check for this by now - this answer looked very promising but it returns true early as @Basj mentioned above. – zero_cool Sep 6 '18 at 6:11
  • @zero_cool are right. This case is not contemplated. Thanks! – Aral Roca Sep 7 '18 at 8:14
  • @Basj https://w is a valid URL – fishbone Nov 13 '18 at 7:53
1

The question asks a validation method for an url such as stackoverflow, without the protocol or any dot in the hostname. So, it's not a matter of validating url sintax, but checking if it's a valid url, by actually calling it.

I tried several methods for knowing if the url true exists and is callable from within the browser, but did not find any way to test with javascript the response header of the call:

  • adding an anchor element is fine for firing the click() method.
  • making ajax call to the challenging url with 'GET' is fine, but has it's various limitations due to CORS policies and it is not the case of using ajax, for as the url maybe any outside my server's domain.
  • using the fetch API has a workaround similar to ajax.
  • other problem is that I have my server under https protocol and throws an exception when calling non secure urls.

So, the best solution I can think of is getting some tool to perform CURL using javascript trying something like curl -I <url>. Unfortunately I did not find any and in appereance it's not possible. I will appreciate any comments on this.

But, in the end, I have a server running PHP and as I use Ajax for almost all my requests, I wrote a function on the server side to perform the curl request there and return to the browser.

Regarding the single word url on the question 'stackoverflow' it will lead me to https://daniserver.com.ar/stackoverflow, where daniserver.com.ar is my own domain.

  • The OP should probably have indicated more of what his intent was. The problem certainly varies upon your needs and whether it's more important to exclude false positives or include false negatives. As the problem is stated there seems to be no answer to me. Can you really take foo and assume it's http or https or .com or .es or any of the countless suffixes? Do you keep throwing the kitchen sink at it until you get a true? – aamarks Apr 23 '18 at 21:45
1

This is quite difficult to do with pure regex because URLs have many 'inconveniences'.

  1. For example domain names have complicated restrictions on hyphens:

    a. It is allowed to have many consecutive hyphens in the middle.

    b. but the first character and last character of the domain name cannot be a hyphen

    c. The 3rd and 4th character cannot be both hyphen

  2. Similarly port number can only be in the range 1-65535. This is easy to check if you extract the port part and convert to int but quite difficult to check with a regular expression.

  3. There is also no easy way to check valid domain extensions. Some countries have second-level domains(such as 'co.uk'), or the extension can be a long word such as '.international'. And new TLDs are added regularly. This type of things can only be checked against a hard-coded list. (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Top-level_domain)

  4. Then there are magnet urls, ftp addresses etc. These all have different requirements.

Nevertheless, here is a function that handles pretty much everything except:

  • Case 1. c
  • Accepts any 1-5 digit port number
  • Accepts any extension 2-13 chars
  • Does not accept ftp, magnet, etc...

function isValidURL(input) {
    pattern = '^(https?:\\/\\/)?' + // protocol
        '((([a-zA-Z\\d]([a-zA-Z\\d-]{0,61}[a-zA-Z\\d])*\\.)+' + // sub-domain + domain name
        '[a-zA-Z]{2,13})' + // extension
        '|((\\d{1,3}\\.){3}\\d{1,3})' + // OR ip (v4) address
        '|localhost)' + // OR localhost
        '(\\:\\d{1,5})?' + // port
        '(\\/[a-zA-Z\\&\\d%_.~+-:@]*)*' + // path
        '(\\?[a-zA-Z\\&\\d%_.,~+-:@=;&]*)?' + // query string
        '(\\#[-a-zA-Z&\\d_]*)?$'; // fragment locator
    regex = new RegExp(pattern);
    return regex.test(input);
}

let tests = [];
tests.push(['', false]);
tests.push(['http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Procter_&_Gamble', true]);
tests.push(['https://sdfasd', false]);
tests.push(['http://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&docid=nIv5rk2GyP3hXM&tbnid=isiOkMe3nCtexM:&ved=0CAUQjRw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fanimalcrossing.wikia.com%2Fwiki%2FLion&ei=ygZXU_2fGKbMsQTf4YLgAQ&bvm=bv.65177938,d.aWc&psig=AFQjCNEpBfKnal9kU7Zu4n7RnEt2nerN4g&ust=1398298682009707', true]);
tests.push(['https://stackoverflow.com/', true]);
tests.push(['https://w', false]);
tests.push(['aaa', false]);
tests.push(['aaaa', false]);
tests.push(['oh.my', true]);
tests.push(['dfdsfdsfdfdsfsdfs', false]);
tests.push(['google.co.uk', true]);
tests.push(['test-domain.MUSEUM', true]);
tests.push(['-hyphen-start.gov.tr', false]);
tests.push(['hyphen-end-.com', false]);
tests.push(['https://sdfasdp.international', true]);
tests.push(['https://sdfasdp.pppppppp', false]);
tests.push(['https://sdfasdp.ppppppppppppppppppp', false]);
tests.push(['https://sdfasd', false]);
tests.push(['https://sub1.1234.sub3.sub4.sub5.co.uk/?', true]);
tests.push(['http://www.google-com.123', false]);
tests.push(['http://my--testdomain.com', false]);
tests.push(['http://my2nd--testdomain.com', true]);
tests.push(['http://thingiverse.com/download:1894343', true]);
tests.push(['https://medium.com/@techytimo', true]);
tests.push(['http://localhost', true]);
tests.push(['localhost', true]);
tests.push(['localhost:8080', true]);
tests.push(['localhost:65536', true]);
tests.push(['localhost:80000', false]);
tests.push(['magnet:?xt=urn:btih:123', true]);

for (let i = 0; i < tests.length; i++) {
    console.log('Test #' + i + (isValidURL(tests[i][0]) == tests[i][1] ? ' passed' : ' failed') + ' on ["' + tests[i][0] + '", ' + tests[i][1] + ']');
}

0

I think using the native URL API is better than a complex regex patterns as @pavlo suggested. It has some drawbacks though which we can fix by some extra code. This approach fails for the following valid url.

//cdn.google.com/script.js

We can add the missing protocol beforehand to avoid that. It also fails to detect following invalid url.

http://w
http://..

So why check the whole url? we can just check the domain. I borrowed the regex to verify domain from here.

function isValidUrl(string) {
    if (string && string.length > 1 && string.slice(0, 2) == '//') {
        string = 'http:' + string; //dummy protocol so that URL works
    }
    try {
        var url = new URL(string);
        return url.hostname && url.hostname.match(/^([a-z0-9])(([a-z0-9-]{1,61})?[a-z0-9]{1})?(\.[a-z0-9](([a-z0-9-]{1,61})?[a-z0-9]{1})?)?(\.[a-zA-Z]{2,4})+$/) ? true : false;
    } catch (_) {
        return false;
    }
}

The hostname attribute is empty string for javascript:void(0), so it works for that too, and you can also add IP address verifier too. I'd like to stick to native API's most, and hope it starts to support everything in near future.

  • Interesting, but may still need to work on the regex as it's now introduced false negatives which new URL doesn't have in the tests I've done. This is calling: http://142.42.1.1 //false and blocking high unicode strings. – aamarks Apr 23 '18 at 22:17
0

This seems to be one of the hardest problems in CS ;)

Here's another incomplete solution that works well enough for me and better than the others I've seen here. I'm using a input[type=url] for this in order to support IE11, otherwise it would be much simpler using window.URL to perform the validation instead:

const ipv4Regex = /^(\d{1,3}\.){3}\d{1,3}$/;
function isValidIpv4(ip) {
  if (!ipv4Regex.test(ip)) return false;
  return !ip.split('.').find(n => n > 255);
}

const domainRegex = /(?:[a-z0-9-]{1,63}\.){1,125}[a-z]{2,63}$/i;
function isValidDomain(domain) {
  return isValidIpv4(domain) || domainRegex.test(domain);
}

let input;
function validateUrl(url) {
  if (! /^https?:\/\//.test(url)) url = `http://${url}`; // assuming Babel is used
  // to support IE11 we'll resort to input[type=url] instead of window.URL:
  // try { return isValidDomain(new URL(url).host) && url; } catch(e) { return false; }
  if (!input) { input = document.createElement('input'); input.type = 'url'; }
  input.value = url;
  if (! input.validity.valid) return false;
  const domain = url.split(/^https?:\/\//)[1].split('/')[0].split('@').pop();
  return isValidDomain(domain) && url;
}

console.log(validateUrl('google'), // false
  validateUrl('user:pw@mydomain.com'),
  validateUrl('https://google.com'),
  validateUrl('100.100.100.100/abc'),
  validateUrl('100.100.100.256/abc')); // false

In order to accept incomplete inputs such as "www.mydomain.com" it will also make it valid assuming the protocol is "http" in those cases and returning the valid URL if the address is valid. It returns false when invalid.

It also supports IPv4 domains, but not IPv6.

protected by Community Apr 30 '17 at 16:44

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