1

I'm having the following issue, with how to configure the Autofac container, and can't really find a solution.

Let's say I have a bunch of repositories, like AccountRepository, ContactRepository, LeadRepository etc.

Each of those repositories has a single constructor parameter of type IService which provides implementations of basic CRUD methods. In my case it's a generic web service connection to a 3rd party application, but that doesn't really matter.

So for example I have something like this:

public class AccountRepository
{
    private readonly IService service;

    public AccountRepository(IService service)
    {
        this.service = service ?? throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(service));
    }

    public int GetContactCount(Guid accountId)
    {
        using(DataContext ctx = new DataContext(service))
        {
            return ctx.Contacts.Where(c => c.AccountId == accountId).Count();
        }
    }
}

My domain code is implemented through commands and events. So let's say I have a following command handler, using the above repository:

public class UpdateNrOfContactsCommandHandler : IHandleCommand<UpdateNrOfContactsCommand, Account>
{
    private readonly AccountRepository accountRepo;

    public UpdateNrOfContactsCommandHandler(AccountRepository accountRepo)
    {
        this.accountRepo = accountRepo ?? throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(accountRepo));
    }

    public void Execute(Account account)
    {
        account.NrOfContacts = repo.GetContactCount(account.Id);
    }
}

I don't hide the repository behind any interface, because it's part of the business logic and there will only be one implementation. The IService is the dynamic part (and the one I fake in unit tests). If it helps I can add an interface over it, but that's just additional typing I would like to avoid.

Both the repositories and command handlers are registered dynamically through assembly scanning. I obviously don't want to update my composition root every time I add a new repository or command handler. It should be configured once and left alone (unless we introduce some new abstractions).

So basically i register all repositories from a certain assembly and all command handlers from another. When a command comes in I resolve the handler and call the .Execute() method on it. Pretty standard stuff.

The issue is that depending on the context (which only the command handler knows about, the repository should be totally agnostic) I either need the repositories to do their queries in a system admin context or in the current users context.

I have two instances of the IService:

1. IService serviceAsAdmin
2. IService serviceAsCurrentUser

The service in the admin context should be the default one.

A solution I though about which would be elegant would be somethine like this:

  1. Define a custom attribute like

    public class InUserContextAttribute : Attribute 
    {
    }    
    
  2. Later use this attribute like this:

    public class UpdateNrOfContactsCommandHandler : IHandleCommand<UpdateNrOfContactsCommand, Account>
    {
        private readonly AccountRepository accountRepo;
        private readonly AccountRepository accountRepoAsUser;
    
        public UpdateNrOfContactsCommandHandler(AccountRepository accountRepo, [InUserContext] AccountRepository accountRepoAsUser)
        {
            this.accountRepo = accountRepo ?? throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(accountRepo));
            this.accountRepoAsUser = accountRepoAsUser ?? throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(accountRepoAsUser));
        }
    
        public void Execute(Account account)
        {
            account.NrOfContacts = repo.GetContactCount(account.Id);
            account.NrOfContactsSeenByCurrentUser = accountRepoAsUser.GetContactCount(account.Id);
        }
    }
    

And I don't know how to do this :) Looked into many samples, but none seem to fit this scenario. The additional complication is this needs to be dynamic, through assembly scanning.

I know how to quite easily implement something similar through property injection (by using the Autofac's .OnActivated() method), but those repositories are not optional, so they should be passed in the constructor.

Also I would like to avoid any Autofac references outside the composition root / command bus. Definitely don't want to add any Autofac specific stuff into my business logic.

Basically what I need to do is to somehow register 2 instances of IService in such a way that it get's resolved to one of them if the parameter is not decorated and to the other if it's decorated with the InUserContextAttribute attribute.

Is what I'm trying to achieve possible at all? And how? ;)

1

You have many options to achieve your goal, the one I would prefer is using Named Services.

In order to use named services you register your two IService implementations as such:

// using strings to keep things simple

// first register your services
builder.RegisterType<AdminService>().Named<IService>("admin");
builder.RegisterType<UserService>().Named<IService>("user");

// Then you register your repositories, twice:

foreach(var repoType in assembly.GetTypes.Where(t => IsRepository(t))
{
    builder.RegisterType(repoType)
        .WithParameter(new ResolvedParameter(
           (pi, ctx) => pi.ParameterType == typeof(IService),
           (pi, ctx) => ctx.ResolveNamed("admin"))
        .Named("admin");

    builder.RegisterType(repoType)
        .WithParameter(new ResolvedParameter(
           (pi, ctx) => pi.ParameterType == typeof(IService),
           (pi, ctx) => ctx.ResolveNamed("user"))
        .Named("user");
}

and in your repository constructor you can just:

public UpdateNrOfContactsCommandHandler([KeyFilter("admin")] accountRepo, [KeyFilter("user")] AccountRepository accountRepoAsUser)
    {
        this.accountRepo = accountRepo ?? throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(accountRepo));
        this.accountRepoAsUser = accountRepoAsUser ?? throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(accountRepoAsUser));
    }

You can also use other techniques, such as an extra class implementing the resolution logic, to be used like this:

public class RepoFactory<T>
{
    private ILifetimeScope _scope;

    public RepoFactory(ILifetimeScope scope)
    {
        _scope = scope;
    }

    public class RepoContext : IDisposable
    {
       public T Instance { get; }

       public void Dispose()
       {
          // handle disposal of Instance
       }
    }

    public RepoContext<T> AsAdmin()
    {
        var service = scope.ResolveNamed<IService>("admin");
        // keeping it simple, you can leverage more Autofac to improve performance if needed
        var repo = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T), service);
        return new RepoContext<T>(repo);
    }
}
  • Thanks for that although: 1. This adds Autofac specific stuff to the business logic, which I would like to avoid 2. Is this about using that factory inside the command handler to obtain instances of the repositories? Sure I could do that, in several ways, but what I'm trying to achieve is clean constructor injection. – kowgli Jul 25 at 10:54
  • The only "specific stuff" linked to Autofac is the attribute. Which you need anyway (you where thinking of reimplementing it). So my suggestion is: do not reinvent the wheel and go for it. As for two: it is a way to avoid attribute usage, and it accomplishes "clean constructor injection": if (and only if) you don't want to use an Autofac attribute you can put the resolution logic into a dedicated factory class and avoid Autofac specific code in the rest of your application. It is a matter of where do you prefer to put the Autofac management. – A. Chiesa Jul 25 at 11:02
0

Answering my own question because I figured out a way how to do this. Basically the solution (which is actually not very complicated) involves utilizing the ResolvedParameter parameter of Autofac's .Resolve() method.

It allows you to inject specific parameters into an object that's being resolved.

If anyone is interested below is the exact code I used. Note - this is made with a CRM system in mind. The "service connection" is of type IOrganizationService, the "repositories" I mentioned above are called "Queries" and for this to work should all inherit from an abstract generic class called CrmQuery< TEntity > (this is becuase there is some shared code, but is also utilized in the solution).

public abstract class CrmQuery<TEntity> where TEntity : Entity
{

An example query class would look something like this:

public class AccountQueries : CrmQuery<Account>
{
    public AccountQueries(IOrganizationService orgService) : base(orgService) { }

    public Something[] GetSomething(Guid accountId)
    {
        //...
    }
}

Now this query is utilized in a command handler, with (simplified) code like this:

public class SetNrOfContactsCommandHandler : CommandHandler<SetNrOfContactsCommand>
{
    public SetNrOfContactsCommandHandler(IOrganizationServiceWrapper orgServiceWrapper, IEventBus eventBus, 
        AccountQueries accountQueries, [InUserContext] AccountQueries accountQueriesAsUser) 
        : base(orgServiceWrapper)
    {
    }   
}

The important thing here is that there are two parameters of type AccountQueries, but one of them is decorated with the [InUserContext] attribute.

public class InUserContextAttribute : Attribute
{

}

So now for the solution:

public class Bus : ICommandBus
{
    private readonly IContainer container = null;

    public Bus(IOrganizationServiceWrapper orgServiceWrapper)
    {
        var builder = new ContainerBuilder();

        Assembly domain = typeof(Locator).Assembly;

        builder.RegisterInstance(orgServiceWrapper);            
        builder.RegisterAssemblyTypes(domain).AsClosedTypesOf(typeof(IHandleCommand<>));          
        builder.RegisterAssemblyTypes(domain).AsClosedTypesOf(typeof(CrmQuery<>));

        container = builder.Build();
    }

    public void Handle(ICommand command)
    {
        using(ILifetimeScope scope = container.BeginLifetimeScope())
        { 
            var handlerType = typeof(IHandleCommand<>).MakeGenericType(command.GetType());

            dynamic handler = scope.Resolve(handlerType, new ResolvedParameter(
                (pi, ctx) => {
                    // Determine if we're looking for a parameter that is of a type that extends CrmQuery<>
                    bool isCrmQuery = pi.ParameterType.IsClass
                                      && pi.ParameterType.BaseType.IsGenericType
                                      && pi.ParameterType.BaseType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(CrmQuery<>);

                    return isCrmQuery;
                },
                (pi, ctx) => {
                    // Check if it has the [InUserContext] attribute
                    bool useUserContextService = pi.CustomAttributes.Any(attr => attr.AttributeType == typeof(InUserContextAttribute));

                    // This contains both the system context and user context CRM service connections
                    IOrganizationServiceWrapper orgServiceWrapper = scope.Resolve<IOrganizationServiceWrapper>();

                    // Inject the correct CRM service reference
                    object resolvedQueryHandler = scope.Resolve(pi.ParameterType, new ResolvedParameter(
                        (_pi, _ctx) => _pi.ParameterType == typeof(IOrganizationService),
                        (_pi, _ctx) => useUserContextService ? orgServiceWrapper.OrgService : orgServiceWrapper.OrgServiceAsSystem
                    ));

                    return resolvedQueryHandler;
                }
            ));

            handler.Execute((dynamic)command);
        }
    }
}

The interesting part is in the .Handle() method.

  1. I find all parameters that are of type CrmQuery<>.
  2. I look if they are decorated with the [InUserContext] attribute.
  3. I try to resolve an instance of the "Query" I am looking for.
  4. For that resolution I again use a ResolvedParameter, this time injecting the correct intance of IOgranizationService

Works :)

  • Good work! I would just avoid using directly the Container in this way: I prefer using Modules for all the configuration, because they keep the rest of the code more organized. With this smaller caveat, the code is exactly what I was referring to as a "factory" class: you are keeping all of the Autofac related stuff in this method and type. – A. Chiesa Jul 26 at 14:55

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