10

G'day all,

I have a console project where it is intended the user presses the keyboard direction keys (non-numeric keypad) to move an avatar. I am having difficulty coding to check for the press of these keys. In Pascal it was easy enough to use "readkey" and code, for example, for #80 for the down keypress. However, I am stumped how to implement the same functionality in Java, though I think I understand the use of System.in and BufferedInputStream.

Could anyone help me out? Your thoughts or hints are much appreciated.

6

If java.io.console doesn't work for you (I haven't tried that), try JLine. I used it to solve a vaguely similar problem.

1
  • JLine is definitely the way to go, still now!
    – javanna
    Nov 25 '12 at 10:26
5

The Console support issue in Java is well known, I am not sure that this is doable.

This was not initially possible with System.in since it used to work line-based.

Sun eventually added a java.io.Console class.

Here are its JavaDocs: http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/io/Console.html

Once you get the console (I think from System.console), you can get a reader and perhaps read characters from it, but I'm not sure if it includes keys.

Generally, you're supposed to use Swing or AWT if you want access to the keyboard, which is silly.

As of 2007, there was a feature request about it: here

3
  • Thanks very much. I might return to Pascal then, or try and implement my project in Swing.
    – elwynn
    Feb 21 '09 at 2:54
  • Don't go back to Pascal. Java has many benefits. Console applications use the console primarily for line-based output and input, they weren't meant for full interaction, that was an aberration of DOS that is still supported in Pascal.
    – Uri
    Feb 21 '09 at 3:03
  • Since most chances are that your program runs within a GUI OS, you can use swing and use a canvas that just displays text like a console if you want to do text based work.
    – Uri
    Feb 21 '09 at 3:04
5

Unfortunately this is not possible in a portable way:

http://forums.sun.com/thread.jspa?threadID=5351637&messageID=10526512

On Windows, reading from System.in will block until enter is pressed, even when you do not use a BufferedReader. Arrows will cycle through the command history. Try it yourself:

import java.io.*;
public class KeyTest {
  public static void main(String[] argv) {
    try {
      InputStreamReader unbuffered = new InputStreamReader(System.in);
      for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
        int x = unbuffered.read();
        System.out.println(String.format("%08x", x));
      }
    } catch (Exception e) {
      System.err.println(e);
    }
  }
}

Same issue using the Console class (input buffered under Windows, arrow keys intepreted by Windows):

import java.io.*;
public class KeyTest2 {
  public static void main(String[] argv) {
    try {
      Console cons = System.console();
      if (cons != null) {
        Reader unbuffered = cons.reader();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i ) {
          int x = unbuffered.read();
          System.out.println(String.format("%08x", x));
        }
      }
    } catch (Exception e) {
      System.err.println(e);
    }
  }
}
0

Not with built-in Java code. Check out java curses libraries or JLine as mentioned above, if you want to continue.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.