Given a branch, I'd like to see a list of commits that exist only on that branch. In this question we discuss ways to see which commits are on one branch but not one or more specified other branches.

This is slightly different. I'd like to see which commits are on one branch but not on any other branches.

The use case is in a branching strategy where some branches should only be merged to, and never committed directly on. This would be used to check if any commits have been made directly on a "merge-only" branch.

EDIT: Below are steps to set up a dummy git repo to test:

git init
echo foo1 >> foo.txt
git add foo.txt
git commit -am "initial valid commit"
git checkout -b merge-only
echo bar >> bar.txt
git add bar.txt
git commit -am "bad commit directly on merge-only"
git checkout master
echo foo2 >> foo.txt 
git commit -am "2nd valid commit on master"
git checkout merge-only 
git merge master

Only the commit with message "bad commit directly on merge-only", which was made directly on the merge-only branch, should show up.

  • This question presumes all the merged-from branches are currently available on the repo, are never deleted once fully merged in, and maybe never merged with a fast-forward. Let me know if I'm missing something, but it seems to me this is only workable for a relatively small set of allowed merge-from branches, so why not just use the git log ^branch1 ^branch2 merge-only-branch syntax? – Karl Bielefeldt Apr 19 '11 at 19:02
  • The git log ^branch1 ^branch2 merge-only-branch requires listing out every single branch. That can be avoided with some clever use of bash/grep (see my answer below), but I'm hoping git has some built-in support for this. You're correct that it presumes all merge-from branches are remote (local only are as good as non-existant to other devs). Using --no-merges omits any commits that were merged in and then had their original merge-from branch deleted, so this assumes the merge-from branches are kept around until they have been merged to a non-merge-only-branch (i.e. master). – jimmyorr Apr 19 '11 at 20:37
  • Possibly related: Using Git, show all commits that are in one branch, but not the other(s). – user456814 May 28 '14 at 16:53

My colleague just found this elegant solution git log --first-parent --no-merges. In your example of course the initial commit still shows up.

PLEASE READ: this answer does not exactly answer the question, because the initial commit still shows up. On the other hand many people coming here seem to find the answer they are looking for. Please consider this before down voting. See comments for discussion.

  • 1
    Simple, effective, best. – Zabba Jun 28 '12 at 1:40
  • 1
    Since the initial commit on master still shows up, this doesn't answer the question. – jimmyorr Feb 6 '13 at 22:55
  • 5
    This alone doesn't satisfy “commits that exist only on that branch” condition— it shows the initial valid commit, which is part of both the merge-only and master branches. However, if one goes through the effort of puttin the current branch name at the end followed by ^-prefixed branch name(s) that one knows the current branch stemmed off of, it solves half the problems (excluding things that were merged). Ex: git log --first-parent --no-merges merge-only ^master – Slipp D. Thompson Oct 18 '13 at 18:50
  • 7
    I'm not sure why this is upvoted so much, it doesn't appear to be pertinent to the question at all. It certainly doesn't provide the information that the poster was looking for. – Chris Rasys May 20 '14 at 18:55
  • 2
    This answer may not be perfect. But it's simple and certainly works to some extend. I find it useful to add the branch name - ie filter all commits belong to a given branch: git log --first-parent --no-merges | grep <branch_name> – artm Mar 21 '16 at 4:33
up vote 24 down vote accepted

Courtesy of my dear friend Redmumba:

git log --no-merges origin/merge-only \
    --not $(git for-each-ref --format="%(refname)" refs/remotes/origin |
    grep -Fv refs/remotes/origin/merge-only)

...where origin/merge-only is your remote merge-only branch name. If working on a local-only git repo, substitute refs/remotes/origin with refs/heads, and substitute remote branch name origin/merge-only with local branch name merge-only, i.e.:

git log --no-merges merge-only \
    --not $(git for-each-ref --format="%(refname)" refs/heads |
    grep -Fv refs/heads/merge-only)
  • 2
    I'm hoping someone else can provide a grep-less solution using only git, but if not, this feels pretty elegant. – jimmyorr Apr 19 '11 at 18:13
  • 1
    Yes, elegant. Use git for-each-ref to list every ref name in origin, and grep -v to omit the merge-only branch. git log takes a --not option, to which we pass our list of all refs (except the merge-only branch). If you have a more elegant answer to the problem, let's hear it. – jimmyorr Apr 19 '11 at 20:46
  • 2
    Oh I'm sure it's the most elegant answer. I'm only arguing it's a bit "wordy/complex" for true elegance. :-) Did not mean to disparage your approach, sir! – Chris K Apr 19 '11 at 21:24
  • 1
    The trailing /* in the git for-each-refs commands rely on not matching some existing file and not having failglob or nullglob set (bash options, other shells vary). You should either quote/escape the asterisks or just leave the trailing /* off (git for-each-ref patterns can match “from the beginning up to a slash”). Maybe use grep -Fv refs/remotes/origin/foo (refs/heads/foo) to be more strict about which refs are eliminated. – Chris Johnsen Apr 20 '11 at 6:25
  • 3
    It can be simplified if you just want to see commits present in one branch and not in another: git log --no-merges B1 --not B2, where B1 is branch which you're interested in, and B2 is branch you want to compare B1 to. Both B1 and B2 can be local or remote branches, thus you can specify git log --no-merges master --not origin/master, or even specify two remote branches. – mr.b Mar 15 '12 at 0:03

Maybe this could help:

git show-branch

git log origin/dev..HEAD

This will show you all the commits made in your branch.

  • 1
    To me, this should be the correct answer – Christian Vielma Jun 9 '16 at 13:23
  • @Prakash origin/branchName will point to head of remote branch AND HEAD will point to commitid of last local commit in that branch. So this will not work when you have used git push. – Bharat Sep 8 '16 at 13:10

Try this:

git rev-list --all --not $(git rev-list --all ^branch)

Basically git rev-list --all ^branch gets all revisions not in branch and then you all the revisions in the repo and subtract the previous list which is the revisions only in the branch.

After @Brian's comments:

From git rev-list's documentation:

List commits that are reachable by following the parent links from the given commit(s)

So a command like git rev-list A where A is a commit will list commits that are reachable from A inclusive of A.

With that in mind, something like

git rev-list --all ^A

will list commits not reachable from A

So git rev-list --all ^branch will list all commits not reachable from the tip of branch. Which will remove all the commits in the branch, or in other words commits that are only in other branches.

Now let's come to git rev-list --all --not $(git rev-list --all ^branch)

This will be like git rev-list --all --not {commits only in other branches}

So we want to list all that are not reachable from all commits only in other branches

Which is the set of commits that are only in branch. Let's take a simple example:

             master

             |

A------------B

  \

   \

    C--------D--------E

                      |

                      branch

Here the goal is to get D and E, the commits not in any other branch.

git rev-list --all ^branch give only B

Now, git rev-list --all --not B is what we come down to. Which is also git rev-list -all ^B - we want all commits not reachable from B. In our case it's is D and E. Which is what we want.

Hope this explains how the command works correctly.

Edit after comment:

git init
echo foo1 >> foo.txt
git add foo.txt
git commit -am "initial valid commit"
git checkout -b merge-only
echo bar >> bar.txt
git add bar.txt
git commit -am "bad commit directly on merge-only"
git checkout master
echo foo2 >> foo.txt 
git commit -am "2nd valid commit on master"

After the above steps, if you do a git rev-list --all --not $(git rev-list --all ^merge-only) you will get the commit you were looking for - the "bad commit directly on merge-only" one.

But once you do the final step in your steps git merge master the command will not give the expected output. Because as of now there is no commit that is not there in merge-only since the one extra commit in master also has been merged to merge-only. So git rev-list --all ^branch gives empty result and hence git rev-list -all --not $(git rev-list --all ^branch) will give all the commits in merge-only.

  • 1
    Hm...not sure why, but this doesn't quite work. Piping your command's output to xargs -L 1 -t git branch -a --contains shows plenty of false positives (commits that are in fact on other branches). I tried with and without --no-merges. Thanks for answering though! – jimmyorr Apr 20 '11 at 3:32
  • Seems to work fine for me as far as I can see in a dummy git repo. – manojlds Apr 20 '11 at 3:34
  • I've added steps to create a dummy git repo to help demonstrate the problem with your answer. – jimmyorr Apr 20 '11 at 4:46
  • Ah, whoops. Upvoted this before I'd thought it all the way through. git rev-list --all ^branch will give you all commits that are not in branch. You are then subtracting that from the list that are in branch; but by definition, all commits that are not in branch are not in branch, so you're not subtracting anything. What jimmyorr is looking for are commits that are in branch but not master, nor any other branch. You don't want to subtract the commits that aren't in branch; you want to subtract the commits that are in any other branches. – Brian Campbell Apr 20 '11 at 4:59
  • 1
    @manojlds "(all revisions ) - ( all revisions not in branch ) = revision in branch." Yes, that works to get all revisions in branch, but so does git rev-list branch. You're just writing git rev-list branch in a more complicated (and slower) way. It doesn't work to answer the question, which is how to find all commits in branch that are not in any other branch. – Brian Campbell Apr 20 '11 at 12:38

@Prakash answer works. Just for clarity ...

git checkout feature-branch
git log master..HEAD

lists the commits on feature-branch but not the upstream branch (typically your master).

Another variation of the accepted answers, to use with master

git log origin/master --not $(git branch -a | grep -Fv master)

Filter all commits that happen in any branch other than master.

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