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I created a local branch and committed changed to it, but later a remote branch was created for me which I did a git fetch to obtain access to locally.

How do I now move everything including untracked files over to the remote branch that was created?

I don't want to lose any of my work, basically I want it so it's as if this new remote branch that was created is where I did my work all along, as I plan to delete the local branch I originally created.

This can be confusing, so let me illustrate.

I created a local branch called ENGA-2604, but this branch will not be used now. Instead, this one will be used remotes/origin/feature/ENGA-2603.

So origin/feature/ENGA-2603 is what was created for me and so my work has to be in that branch because of the network tree it follows has to be the same as you can see below:

enter image description here

So thatENGA-2604 with the yellow track lines is what I created and that one has to go away, it's on the wrong track. As a result, feature/ENGA-2603 was created for me, the one on the red track line. So all my work has to be in that one.

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2 Answers 2

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How do I now move everything including untracked files over to the remote branch that was created?

(emphasis mine)

You don't. Fortunately, you don't need to. Side note: I've assumed feature/ENGA-2603 is a typo that should read feature/ENGA-2604. If not, change the strings below appropriately.

Untracked files are not in the index and therefore are not in the next commit. The definition of "untracked file" is a file that exists in the work-tree, but not in the index. Branches only contain commits. Commits contain files. Files that are in a commit wind up in the index when you check out that branch, so if the file is not in the index, it won't be in the branch.

As I understand your question, you are currently working in a branch named ENGA-2604. That is, if you run git status, its first line will say:

on branch ENGA-2604

(most of the remaining lines will be about what's different in the index vs the HEAD commit, and what's different in the work-tree vs the index).

You can easily rename any branch, including the one you are on. So just rename this branch:

git branch -m feature/ENGA-2604

You are now working on a branch named feature/ENGA-2604. You can set its upstream to the name origin/feature/ENGA-2604:

git fetch
git branch --set-upstream-to origin/feature/ENGA-2604

The git fetch will create origin/feature/ENGA-2604 (since feature/ENGA-2604 now exists in the repository you call origin); the --set-upstream-to sets your (local) origin/feature/ENGA-2604 as the name that your Git should use when comparing your (local) feature/ENGA-2604 to its upstream. Now git status will say things like:

on branch feature/ENGA-2604 (ahead 2, behind 3)

if/as appropriate.

The three commands git branch -m, git fetch, and git branch --set-upstream-to have no effects at all upon your existing index and work-tree. So no work you are doing right now has changed in any way. You've just renamed your local branch so that its name is now feature/ENGA-2604, and set it up to "track"1 your origin/feature/ENGA-2604.


1This is a terrible verb, but is the one Git uses. A local branch such as feature/ENGA-2604 "tracks" a remote-tracking name such as origin/feature/ENGA-2604 when the remote-tracking name is set as the upstream of the branch name. What this really does is convince Git to print those ahead 2 and/or behind 3 kind of strings when you run git status.

Well, it does slightly more: it makes git push and git merge and git rebase all a little more convenient, too. It enables you to use git pull too, but I would encourage you to avoid git pull. Use git fetch, then look at the commits that git fetch fetched, then run git merge or git rebase as appropriate, based on what git fetch fetched.

If you can predict, with 100% certainty (or close enough), what git fetch will fetch, then you can use git pull, which is just shorthand for run git fetch, then run one of git merge or git rebase: I have already picked which second command to use, without looking at what git fetch is going to fetch. You control the second command through your Git configuration, or by using git pull --rebase.

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  • I added some more information, please check it out as it might affect your answer. I created ENGA-2604 on the yellow track line and I need to move all my work to feature/ENGA-2603 to be on the red track line. So no matter what it has to show that my one and only branch is on that red track line and other one blown away after the work has been moved.
    – Daniel
    Jul 25, 2019 at 17:36
  • after doing --set-upstream-to I find that origin/feature/ENGA-2603 still has the old legacy code. Which steps overwrites that code with what I have in ENGA-2604?
    – Daniel
    Jul 25, 2019 at 18:18
  • @Daniel: nothing overwrites anything here, which is kind of the point. You can still make new commits as your index and work-tree are still intact. The name of the branch has changed, but nothing else has changed. Everything else is a matter of making the right set of commits: which commits should be on which branches? What files should be in each commit? (Each commit is a complete snapshot of all tracked files.)
    – torek
    Jul 25, 2019 at 18:43
  • I need some kind of rebase or something that overwrites. I had to create a brand new branch that was not tied to the bitbucket project. Then create a brand new react-native app and then bring over the relevant codebase in order for it to successfully upgrade. So its like a totally different project that I now need it to overwrite whats in that remote origin/feature/ENGA-2603
    – Daniel
    Jul 25, 2019 at 18:52
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    I'd encourage you to take a step back away from all of this for a bit, and just experiment with several new repositories you'll create, because you will need to learn how to build commit chains, and deliberately wreck a few things to see how it all works. Find a good book or tutorial on Git (the Pro Git book is not bad). Learn what Git puts in each individual commit, how it chains them together, how various interfaces (GUIs) deliberately show you simplified lies about what's really going on, and how git push --force makes one repository command another to forget some commits.
    – torek
    Jul 25, 2019 at 19:34
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The easiest way is to set the remote tracking branch for your local branch. Be sure to fetch the upstream branch first:

git fetch
git branch --set-upstream-to origin/feature/ENGA-2603 ENGA-2604

If you also want your local branch name to match, you can rename it:

git branch -m feature/ENGA-2604 ENGA-2604

Now you can git pull to merge in work from other developers or git push to push your own work.

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  • He may need a git fetch first, to get his Git to create origin/feature/ENGA-2603.
    – torek
    Jul 25, 2019 at 16:41
  • @Code-Apprentice, I added some more information, please check it out as it might affect your answer. I created ENGA-2604 on the yellow track line and I need to move all my work to feature/ENGA-2603 to be on the red track line. So no matter what it has to show that my one and only branch is on that red track line and other one blown away after the work has been moved.
    – Daniel
    Jul 25, 2019 at 17:36
  • @Code-Apprentice, after doing --set-upstream-to and I go into that new branch that was created for me, I find the old legacy code in there. I want all the work from my ENGA-2604 to be in there, I want it to overwrite whatever is in there.
    – Daniel
    Jul 25, 2019 at 18:08
  • @Daniel It sounds like you now have two local branches: ENGA-2604 contains the changes you have made. feature/ENGA-2604 contains the changes from the remote that you no longer need. If you truly want to get rid of those changes, then first delete your local feature/ENGA-2604 branch. Then rename ENGA-2604 to feature/ENGA-2604. Finally, do git push --force to overwrite the branch on bitbucket with your changes. Note that this last command is destructive and incredibly difficult, if not impossible, to reverse. So be sure you want to do this before doing it. Jul 25, 2019 at 20:38
  • @Daniel After looking more closely at your picture, it looks like you will also need to merge your feature branch with the most recent release. Jul 25, 2019 at 20:39

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