41
#include <initializer_list>

struct Obj {
    int i;
};

Obj a, b;

int main() {
    for(Obj& obj : {a, b}) {
        obj.i = 123;   
    }
}

This code does not compile because the values from the initializer_list {a, b} are taken as const Obj&, and cannot be bound to the non-const reference obj.

Is there a simple way to make a similar construct work, i.e. iterate over values that are in different variables, like a and b here.

  • @ruohola It was not specifically about using an initializer_list (like in this incorrect code), but if there is any other simple way in C++ to be able to iterate over objects that are in separate variables – tmlen Aug 1 at 11:24
  • And it is maybe not useful to try to perfectly follow modern C++ conventions like avoiding raw pointers and using std::reference_wrapper when it only makes the code more complicated; given that C++ itself is far from perfect – tmlen Aug 1 at 11:28
  • Okay, I understand :) Just thought that because all the well received answers solved the problem with std::initalizer_list, and that turned out to be the cleanest way to solve this, your question's intent could be drifted to be about initializer_list so that people searching for this kind of solution will find the answer more easily. – ruohola Aug 1 at 11:28
51

It does not work because in {a,b} you are making a copy of a and b. One possible solution would be to make the loop variable a pointer, taking the addresses of a and b:

#include <initializer_list>

struct Obj {
    int i;
};

Obj a, b;

int main() {
    for(auto obj : {&a, &b}) {
        obj->i = 123;   
    }
}

See it live

Note: it is generically better to use auto, as it could avoid silent implicit conversions

  • Would for(auto& obj: {&a,&b}) work here? Or is that doing a conversion? – Demolishun Aug 1 at 17:31
  • 1
    @Demolishun with auto& obj : {&a, &b}, the variable obj is a const reference to a pointer. It makes sense to use pointer to references only when you want to modify the pointer itself, see here. In this case you would not be able to do so, because obj a const reference to the temporary pointers &a and &b. That said, in practive you would not notice any difference in the compiled code, check here – francesco Aug 2 at 7:45
44

The reason why that doesn't work is that the underlying elements of the std::initializer_list are copied from a and b, and are of type const Obj, so you are essentially trying to bind a constant value to a mutable reference.

One could try to fix this by using:

for (auto obj : {a, b}) {
    obj.i = 123;
}

but then would soon notice that the actual values of i in the objects a and b didn't change. The reason is that when using auto here, the type of the loop variable obj will become Obj, so then you're just looping over copies of a and b.

The actual way this should be fixed is that you can use std::ref (defined in the <functional> header), to make the items in the initializer list be of type std::reference_wrapper<Obj>. That is implictly convertible to Obj&, so you can keep that as the type of the loop variable:

#include <functional>
#include <initializer_list>
#include <iostream>

struct Obj {
    int i;
};

Obj a, b;

int main()
{
    for (Obj& obj : {std::ref(a), std::ref(b)}) { 
        obj.i = 123;
    }
    std::cout << a.i << '\n';
    std::cout << b.i << '\n';
}

Output:

123
123

An alternative way to do the above would be to make the loop use const auto& and std::reference_wrapper<T>::get. We can use a constant reference here, because the reference_wrapper doesn't get altered, just the value it wraps does:

for (const auto& obj : {std::ref(a), std::ref(b)}) { 
    obj.get().i = 123;
}

but I think that, because using auto here forces the use of .get(), this is quite cumbersome and the former method is the preferable way to solve this.


It might seem to be more simple to do this by using raw pointers in the loop as @francesco did in his answer, but I have a habit of avoiding raw pointers as much as possible, and in this case I just believe that using references makes the code clearer and cleaner.

  • 3
    +1. While it maybe "looks" slightly more complicated, I deem this solution vastly superior compared to the accepted one, which not only changes semantics to pointers (which is "weird" if one expects objects), and thanks to using the generically, maliciously better auto without an ampersand actually copies pointers without that being obvious to the user. The auto keyword is such a dirty traitor. Copying pointers is admittedly "mostly harmless" but that's only a coincidence. Using actual references (with reference/object semantics) all through is just cleaner. – Damon Jul 28 at 12:22
5

If copying a and b is the desired behavior, you can use a temporary array rather than an initializer list:

#include <initializer_list>

struct Obj {
    int i;
} a, b;

int main() {
    typedef Obj obj_arr[];
    for(auto &obj : obj_arr{a, b}) {
        obj.i = 123;   
    }
}

This works even if Obj only has a move constructor.

  • 1
    If copying is the desired behaviour, you don't need a temporary array, just drop the reference: for(auto obj : {a, b}) { obj.i = 123; } – zett42 Jul 28 at 15:07
  • Yes; I've now added a note explaining why I still think it's relevant. – Jacob Manaker Aug 1 at 17:00
-3

A wee bit ugly but you can do this, since C++17:

#define APPLY_TUPLE(func, t) std::apply( [](auto&&... e) { ( func(e), ...); }, (t))

static void f(Obj& x)
{
    x.i = 123;
}

int main() 
{
    APPLY_TUPLE(f, std::tie(a, b));
}

It even would work if the objects are not all of the same type, by making f an overload set. You can also have f be a (possibly overloaded) local lambda . Link to inspiration.

The std::tie avoids the problem in the original code because it generates a tuple of references. Unfortunately std::begin is not defined for tuples where all members are the same type (that would be nice!), so we can't use the ranged-based for-loop. But std::apply is the next layer of generalization up.

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