9

How can I produce a random number in a range from 1 million to 10 million?

rand(10) works, I tried rand(1..10) and that didn't work.

13

Take your base number, 1,000,000 and add a random number from 0 up to your max - starting number:

 1_000_000 + Random.rand(10_000_000 - 1_000_000) #=> 3084592
5
  • I'm using ruby 1.8.7, Random doesnt' seem to exist. is it a gem?
    – Blankman
    Apr 19 '11 at 22:26
  • @Blankman: Did you try require 'random', and also checking if it's 1.9.2 only? Apr 19 '11 at 22:41
  • 1.8.7 doesn't have Random. It's in 1.9.2+. Install the backports gem and you'll inherit it in 1.8.7, along with lots of other juicy goodness. Apr 19 '11 at 23:41
  • what are the ramifications of installing backport? (if any)
    – Blankman
    Apr 20 '11 at 1:15
  • 4
    Just use rand, not Random.rand. It works all the way back as far as 1.6.0 Apr 20 '11 at 13:10
6

It's an instance method:

puts Random.new.rand(1_000_000..10_000_000-1) 
1
  • 2
    1_000_000...10_000_000 is more Ruby-ish.
    – sawa
    Apr 19 '11 at 22:24
2

I find this more readable:

7.times.map { rand(1..9) }.join.to_i
0
1

This will generate a random number between 1,000,000 and 9,999,999.

rand(10_000_000-1_000_000)+1_000_000

This works in 1.8.7 without any gems(backports, etc).

1

Or, in case performance is not an issue and you don't want to count zeros:

(0...7).map { |i| rand((i == 0 ? 1 : 0)..9) }.join.to_i
1
  • Needed a way to avoid zeros Jun 13 '15 at 14:49
0

Another option with ruby 1.8.7 compatibility:

rand(9999999999).to_s.center(10, rand(9).to_s).to_i

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