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new to erlang and trying to figure this out, please help:

This question asks you to define four functions that operate over lists. Each question gives an example of how the function should behave; in each case give two more examples of what your function should do. You should define your functions from scratch, not using library functions.

1.1 Write a function that, given a list of integers and an integer, will return a list containing all the elements bigger than that integer. For example, bigger([1,2,3,4,5],3) is [4,5].

  • Try to start even simpler. Can you write a function that prints out every element of a list, e.g. io:format("~w~n", [Number]). When you figure that out, post your solution. When you start learning erlang, it is hard. You have to stuggle and fight for every line of code. But struggling will teach you a lot! And, it doesn't matter if you aren't able to come up with a solution, which will feel like you are failing, but once you see the solution after you have struggled with the problem, it will really sink in... – 7stud Jul 30 at 17:44
  • Here's a hint: write a function that accepts the arguments specified in the problem. Inside that function, call another function with same arguments and an empty list added as a 3rd argument. The empty list can be used to accumulate the results. – 7stud Jul 30 at 17:49
  • I've been looking up how to manipulate lists etc and came up with this solution but not entirely sure if its correct bigger([],_) -> []; bigger([X|Xs], A) -> when X>A -> [X| bigger(A,Xs)]; bigger([_|Xs], A) -> bigger(A,Xs). – yvvy19 Jul 31 at 16:34
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Don't post code in comments. You can edit your question and post the code at the bottom(nicely formatted), then leave a comment saying something like: @7stud, Can you take a another look?

You are close, but your code won't compile because you have a syntax error. This:

bigger([X|Xs], A) -> when X>A -> 

should be written like this:

bigger([X|Xs], A) when X>A -> 

Next, you defined your function clauses to take a list as the first argument and a number as the second argument, yet in some instances you call your function with the list as the second argument and the number as the first argument. When you call your function with the number as the first argument, it won't match the list you defined as the first argument in all your function clauses, so you get a no function clause matching error.

Here's a simple example of that error:

-module(a).
-compile(export_all).

go([Head|Tail], Number) ->
    {Head, Tail, Number}.

In the shell:

11> c(a).
a.erl:2: Warning: export_all flag enabled - all functions will be exported
{ok,a}

12> a:go(10, [1, 2, 3]).   
** exception error: no function clause matching a:go(10,[1,2,3]) (a.erl, line 4)

Erlang tries to match the function call against the function definition like this:

               a:go(10, [1, 2, 3]).
                     |       |
  [Head|Tail] = 10   |       |  Number = [1, 2, 3]
                     V       V
            go([Head|Tail], Number) ->

The integer 10 has no head or tail, so the match fails. Similarly:

13> [Head|Tail] = 10.
** exception error: no match of right hand side value 10
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bigger(L, I) when is_list(L), is_integer(I) ->
    [X || X <- L, X > I].

No need for library functions.

  • @yvvy19: This solution is perfectly correct, but since you are starting with erlang I think you should consider this syntax later, when you will master the recursion and the pattern matching. – Pascal Aug 1 at 16:29
  • @Pascal I respectfully disagree. List comprehension is an important part of the language and library function lists:filter/2 is implemented using list comprehension. For mastering recursion and pattern matching I'd recommend exercises like: find min or max element of the list of numbers; calculate the sum of list elements; ... – Yuri Ginsburg Aug 1 at 23:46
  • @yvvy19: Guard expression "when is_list(L), is_integer(I)" can be removed and functionality will be the same. – Yuri Ginsburg Aug 4 at 15:02
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I suppose you can use a simple list generators, eg:

1> [X || X <- [1, 2, 3, 4, 5], X > 3].
[4,5]

Or you can create a simple function like bigger.erl:

-module(bigger).

-export([run/2]).

run([_|_] = L, N) when is_number(N) -> run(L, N, []);
run(_, _)                           -> {error, badarg}.

run([], _, Acc)                 -> lists:reverse(Acc);
run([H|T], N, Acc) when H > N   -> run(T, N, [H|Acc]);
run([_|T], N, Acc)              -> run(T, N, Acc).

In Erlang shell:

1> c(bigger).
{ok,bigger}
2> bigger:run([1, 2, 3, 4, 5], 3).
[4,5]

Or you can create function with list generators, eg bigger.erl:

-module(bigger).

-export([run/2]).

run([_|_] = L, N) when is_number(N) -> [X || X <- L, X > N];
run(_, _)                           -> {error, badarg}.

In Erlang shell:

1> c(bigger).
{ok,bigger}
2> bigger:run([1, 2, 3, 4, 5], 3).
[4,5]

Notes: The function with list generators is more clear and will be working more faster by reason that, we go around the list at a time. In other cases - you will need to do list reverse and this will be mean that the list will be crawled twice.

-1

the simplest way to achieve your goal is to use stdlib.lists module

like below:

 bigger(L,I) -> lists:filter(fun(X) -> X  > I end, L).

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