974

How do you style an input type="file" button?

<input type="file" />

3
  • I will add my own answer to do it the way I did...but here is an example based on bootstrap which might help.. geniuscarrier.com/… Apr 7, 2017 at 23:37
  • The problem with this element, seems to be that does not take styling like other elements similar to them. Like input type="submit">. I applied the same styling to both input types, and this is what I got: i.imgur.com/7MI1Poh.jpg
    – carloswm85
    Jul 9, 2021 at 20:44
  • Well, what worked for me was just placing a div above the Input element and style the div as you want. Then make Input opacity to 0 and make it the same size has the div. Jan 7 at 1:51

46 Answers 46

1415

You don't need JavaScript for this! Here is a cross-browser solution:

See this example! - It works in Chrome/FF/IE - (IE10/9/8/7)

The best approach would be to have a custom label element with a for attribute attached to a hidden file input element. (The label's for attribute must match the file element's id in order for this to work).

<label for="file-upload" class="custom-file-upload">
    Custom Upload
</label>
<input id="file-upload" type="file"/>

As an alternative, you could also just wrap the file input element with a label directly: (example)

<label class="custom-file-upload">
    <input type="file"/>
    Custom Upload
</label>

In terms of styling, just hide1 the input element using the attribute selector.

input[type="file"] {
    display: none;
}

Then all you need to do is style the custom label element. (example).

.custom-file-upload {
    border: 1px solid #ccc;
    display: inline-block;
    padding: 6px 12px;
    cursor: pointer;
}

1 - It's worth noting that if you hide the element using display: none, it won't work in IE8 and below. Also be aware of the fact that jQuery validate doesn't validate hidden fields by default. If either of those things are an issue for you, here are two different methods to hide the input (1, 2) that work in these circumstances.

26
  • 71
    I do have a question with this one though, when selecting a file how would we go about then displaying the file name ?
    – Richlewis
    Jan 20, 2015 at 12:17
  • 24
    How to display the name of selected file if display: none is set for input[type=file]? Aug 7, 2015 at 9:17
  • 54
    Great solution, but you actually do need javascript. If you want to display the file name, as other people have been asking, you need to add a span between the label and the hidden input: <span id="file-selected"></span>. Then update the span on the change event: $('#file-upload').bind('change', function() { var fileName = ''; fileName = $(this).val(); $('#file-selected').html(fileName); })
    – Sam
    Apr 6, 2016 at 19:05
  • 22
    You should use position: absolute; left: -99999rem instead of display: none for accessibility reasons. Most of the time, screen readers will not read elements if they are hidden using the display: none method.
    – Capsule
    Aug 30, 2016 at 1:29
  • 45
    I'm very surprised to find no-one seems to have considered keyboard accessibility. label elements are not keyboard accessible, unlike buttons and inputs. Adding tabindex is not a solution because the label will still not be actioned when it has focus and the user presses enter. I solved this by visually hiding the input, so it can still be focussed, and then using :focus-within on the label parent: jsbin.com/fokexoc/2/edit?html,css,output Sep 25, 2018 at 10:44
301

Styling file inputs are notoriously difficult, as most browsers will not change the appearance from either CSS or javascript.

Even the size of the input will not respond to the likes of:

<input type="file" style="width:200px">

Instead, you will need to use the size attribute:

<input type="file" size="60" />

For any styling more sophisticated than that (e.g. changing the look of the browse button) you will need to look at the tricksy approach of overlaying a styled button and input box on top of the native file input. The article already mentioned by rm at www.quirksmode.org/dom/inputfile.html is the best one I've seen.

UPDATE

Although it's difficult to style an <input> tag directly, this is easily possible with the help of a <label> tag. See answer below from @JoshCrozier: https://stackoverflow.com/a/25825731/10128619

6
  • 7
    Just found a jquery solution based on this script here: blog.vworld.at/2008/08/21/…
    – mtness
    Feb 3, 2011 at 16:23
  • 1
    @TLK Ryan's answer won't work in IE when trying to do iframe uploads. It gives you an access denied error. For normal uploads, I agree it is the easiest though! Dec 30, 2013 at 13:54
  • 3
    A much simpler solution than quirksmode's is explained here. Just putting that link here, since this answer is basically a link-only answer anyway.
    – Joeytje50
    May 7, 2014 at 16:30
  • 13
    For anyone interested in a modern approach, i'd suggest looking at this answer. It doesn't require JavaScript like some of the other answers either. Sep 13, 2014 at 17:43
  • 3
    @JoshCrozier posted an insanely much better solution. Even beats fake-mouseclicking solutions :)
    – Lodewijk
    Sep 18, 2014 at 0:16
213

follow these steps then you can create custom styles for your file upload form:

  1. this is the simple HTML form(please read the HTML comments I have written here below)

    <form action="#type your action here" method="POST" enctype="multipart/form-data">
      <div id="yourBtn" style="height: 50px; width: 100px;border: 1px dashed #BBB; cursor:pointer;" onclick="getFile()">Click to upload!</div>
      <!-- this is your file input tag, so i hide it!-->
      <div style='height: 0px;width:0px; overflow:hidden;'><input id="upfile" type="file" value="upload"/></div>
      <!-- here you can have file submit button or you can write a simple script to upload the file automatically-->
      <input type="submit" value='submit' >
    </form>
    
  2. then use this simple script to pass the click event to file input tag.

    function getFile(){
         document.getElementById("upfile").click();
    }
    

    Now you can use any type of styling without worrying about how to change default styles.

I know this very well because I have been trying to change the default styles for a month and a half. believe me, it's very hard because different browsers have different upload input tag. So use this one to build your custom file upload forms. Here is the full AUTOMATED UPLOAD code.

function getFile() {
  document.getElementById("upfile").click();
}

function sub(obj) {
  var file = obj.value;
  var fileName = file.split("\\");
  document.getElementById("yourBtn").innerHTML = fileName[fileName.length - 1];
  document.myForm.submit();
  event.preventDefault();
}
#yourBtn {
  position: relative;
  top: 150px;
  font-family: calibri;
  width: 150px;
  padding: 10px;
  -webkit-border-radius: 5px;
  -moz-border-radius: 5px;
  border: 1px dashed #BBB;
  text-align: center;
  background-color: #DDD;
  cursor: pointer;
}
<form action="#type your action here" method="POST" enctype="multipart/form-data" name="myForm">
  <div id="yourBtn" onclick="getFile()">click to upload a file</div>
  <!-- this is your file input tag, so i hide it!-->
  <!-- i used the onchange event to fire the form submission-->
  <div style='height: 0px;width: 0px; overflow:hidden;'><input id="upfile" type="file" value="upload" onchange="sub(this)" /></div>
  <!-- here you can have file submit button or you can write a simple script to upload the file automatically-->
  <!-- <input type="submit" value='submit' > -->
</form>

13
  • 6
    @user1053263 -> Thanks for the recommendation.. here i used a very simple java script, no need to use frameworks like Jquery or PrototypeJS.
    – teshguru
    Mar 15, 2012 at 6:09
  • 7
    I'm having troubles submitting the form in IE9. I'm getting an 'Access is Denied' error which trying to submit the form via javascript. If i click the submit button via the UI, it works. Is there a work around for this?
    – Kevin
    Mar 23, 2012 at 19:29
  • 1
    @kevin -> Please try event.preventDefault() after document.myForm.submit() , i made the change to the above code.
    – teshguru
    Mar 24, 2012 at 4:21
  • 1
    Works well in Chrome, Firefox, Safari & Opera - but not in IE9. In IE9 I get the same 'Access is Denied' error as @Kevin - and sometimes just a silent fail with no error.
    – daveywc
    Jul 4, 2012 at 4:54
  • 10
    In IE10 (and possibly IE9, etc.) you will get "Access is Denied" (or no response from jQuery) if you try and automatically submit the form after clicking the file input button through javascript. So this method works for styling the file input button as long as the user is still the one submitting the form. Took me a while to find this and I see others also have the same issue. See this for more info stackoverflow.com/a/4335390/21579. Mar 19, 2013 at 13:28
81

All rendering engines automatically generate a button when an <input type="file"> is created. Historically, that button has been completely un-styleable. However, Trident and WebKit have added hooks through pseudo-elements.

Trident

As of IE10, the file input button can be styled using the ::-ms-browse pseudo-element. Basically, any CSS rules that you apply to a regular button can be applied to the pseudo-element. For example:

::-ms-browse {
  background: black;
  color: red;
  padding: 1em;
}
<input type="file">

This displays as follows in IE10 on Windows 8:

This displays as follows in IE10 on Windows 8:

WebKit

WebKit provides a hook for its file input button with the ::-webkit-file-upload-button pseudo-element. Again, pretty much any CSS rule can be applied, therefore the Trident example will work here as well:

::-webkit-file-upload-button {
  background: black;
  color: red;
  padding: 1em;
}
<input type="file">

This displays as follows in Chrome 26 on OS X:

This displays as follows in Chrome 26 on OS X:

8
  • There are no special styling possibilities for Gecko-based programs like Firefox.
    – Anselm
    Jul 30, 2013 at 17:47
  • 2
    In you answer,using css,how to hide the "No file chosen" word in <input type=file> tag.Please comment me. Aug 13, 2013 at 19:37
  • I have no idea, sorry
    – Anselm
    Aug 24, 2013 at 9:56
  • 2
    source: tjvantoll.com/2013/04/15/…
    – Anselm
    Oct 13, 2014 at 20:03
  • 2
    In case anyone wants to play with styles I added a jsfidde here: jsfiddle.net/peter_drinnan/r0gq6kw2 Oct 5, 2017 at 15:14
78

Hide it with css and use a custom button with $(selector).click() to activate the the browse button. then set an interval to check the value of the file input type. the interval can display the value for the user so the user can see whats getting uploaded. the interval will clear when the form is submitted [EDIT] Sorry i have been very busy was meaning to update this post, here is an example

<form action="uploadScript.php" method="post" enctype="multipart/form-data">
<div>
    <!-- filename to display to the user -->
    <p id="file-name" class="margin-10 bold-10"></p>

    <!-- Hide this from the users view with css display:none; -->
    <input class="display-none" id="file-type" type="file" size="4" name="file"/>

    <!-- Style this button with type image or css whatever you wish -->
    <input id="browse-click" type="button" class="button" value="Browse for files"/>

    <!-- submit button -->
    <input type="submit" class="button" value="Change"/>
</div>

$(window).load(function () {
    var intervalFunc = function () {
        $('#file-name').html($('#file-type').val());
    };
    $('#browse-click').on('click', function () { // use .live() for older versions of jQuery
        $('#file-type').click();
        setInterval(intervalFunc, 1);
        return false;
    });
});
11
  • 8
    Note that if you use this way it will break in internet explorer because its an security exception..
    – Rejinderi
    Jan 30, 2012 at 15:17
  • 1
    thanks the tip. When i use IE it usually has a separate layout to everything else. HATE IE. but i simplify everything in IE.
    – Ryan
    Jan 31, 2012 at 8:54
  • 1
    With FF20, $('#file-type').click() doesn't seem to bring up the "Choose file" dialg- in fact nothing happens. Any ideas?
    – andig
    Mar 10, 2013 at 11:02
  • 2
    Try using the trigger method in jquery. Also .live changed to .on() in the new jquery
    – Ryan
    Mar 18, 2013 at 8:34
  • 1
    once you've set that interval at what point can I clear it? else it will be constantly firing
    – Dave Haigh
    Jul 30, 2013 at 16:02
69

$('.new_Btn').click(function() {
  $('#html_btn').click();
});
.new_Btn {
  // your css propterties
}

#html_btn {
  display: none;
}
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div class="new_Btn">SelectPicture</div><br>
<input id="html_btn" type='file' " /><br>

You can reach your goals too without jQuery with normal JavaScript.

Now the newBtn is linkes with the html_btn and you can style your new btn like you want :D

6
  • 1
    Just curious, does it work in every browser of new generation such as Firefox, IE, Opera, Safari, Chrome, etc?
    – Wh1T3h4Ck5
    Oct 4, 2012 at 23:17
  • This is the simplest solution for me! A least in IE 9, Chrome 23 and FF 16 with jQuery 1.7.2, so with updated versions it should work. Nov 14, 2012 at 11:38
  • Does anyone know how to change the .new_Btn in case the user has chosen an image. Now it just shows the same class. Anyone know how to track that? Thanks
    – Ando
    Feb 4, 2013 at 9:38
  • 2
    @MehdiKaramosly it works even on IE 6 - but that is true only up to jQuery 1.x , jQuery 2.x+ does not support old IEs
    – jave.web
    May 21, 2014 at 15:01
  • 1
    @Ando via Javascript/jQuery => the value of the file input is empty or contains local file path => use onchange event and test for val() :) see jsfiddle.net/ZrBPF
    – jave.web
    May 21, 2014 at 15:16
38

If you are using Bootstrap 3, this worked for me:

See https://www.abeautifulsite.net/posts/whipping-file-inputs-into-shape-with-bootstrap-3/

.btn-file {
  position: relative;
  overflow: hidden;
}
.btn-file input[type=file] {
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  right: 0;
  min-width: 100%;
  min-height: 100%;
  font-size: 100px;
  text-align: right;
  filter: alpha(opacity=0);
  opacity: 0;
  outline: none;
  background: white;
  cursor: inherit;
  display: block;
}
<link href="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/twitter-bootstrap/3.3.7/css/bootstrap.min.css" rel="stylesheet" />

<span class="btn btn-primary btn-file">
    Browse...<input type="file">
</span>

Which produces the following file input button:

Example button

Seriously, check out https://www.abeautifulsite.net/posts/whipping-file-inputs-into-shape-with-bootstrap-3/

4
  • 2
    This preserves drag&drop functionality which is great :), most answer don't accept dropped files.
    – A1rPun
    Jan 22, 2020 at 17:07
  • That link is broken :/ Aug 24, 2021 at 18:23
  • Fixed. Thanks for the heads up!
    – JDawg
    Aug 24, 2021 at 19:01
  • Don't forget to add role="button" to the span tag.
    – ONE_FE
    May 29 at 13:29
32

Working example here with native Drag and drop support : https://jsfiddle.net/j40xvkb3/

When styling a file input, you shouldn't break any of native interaction the input provides.

The display: none approach breaks the native drag and drop support.

To not break anything, you should use the opacity: 0 approach for the input, and position it using relative / absolute pattern in a wrapper.

Using this technique, you can easily style a click / drop zone for the user, and add custom class in javascript on dragenter event to update styles and give user a feedback to let him see that he can drop a file.

HTML :

<label for="test">
  <div>Click or drop something here</div>
  <input type="file" id="test">
</label>

CSS :

input[type="file"] {
  position: absolute;
  left: 0;
  opacity: 0;
  top: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  width: 100%;
}

div {
  position: absolute;
  left: 0;
  top: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  width: 100%;
  display: flex;
  align-items: center;
  justify-content: center;
  background: #ccc;
  border: 3px dotted #bebebe;
  border-radius: 10px;
}

label {
  display: inline-block;
  position: relative;
  height: 100px;
  width: 400px;
}

Here is a working example (with additional JS to handle dragover event and dropped files).

https://jsfiddle.net/j40xvkb3/

Hope this helped !

9
  • thanks for the post , how does this work if multiple="multiple" attribute is added, i dragged 2 images yet saw the path for only the 1st one
    – PirateApp
    Dec 13, 2017 at 17:19
  • You have missed code here. There is more on the fiddle. What library? Dec 5, 2018 at 9:37
  • There is just some javascript on the fiddle with jQuery to show files that has been dropped. That's all
    – kevcha
    Dec 10, 2018 at 17:54
  • Having implemented this solution and tested it further, it doesn't seem to work either in Edge.
    – ChrisA
    Apr 22, 2019 at 15:24
  • 1
    Ah ok, I missed the wrapper with position relative in your answer - My bad. If the input is below the screen dimensions, the browser tries to scroll to it and in doing so, moves the scroll container up the page. Here is a demonstration: stackblitz.com/edit/input-file-overflow?file=style.css (just not exactly demonstrating how position absolute is the cause of the behaviour)
    – Tom
    Aug 31, 2019 at 5:23
26

ONLY CSS

Use this very simple and EASY

.choose::-webkit-file-upload-button {
  color: white;
  display: inline-block;
  background: #1CB6E0;
  border: none;
  padding: 7px 15px;
  font-weight: 700;
  border-radius: 3px;
  white-space: nowrap;
  cursor: pointer;
  font-size: 10pt;
}
<label>Attach your screenshort</label>
<input type="file" multiple class="choose">

3
  • 2
    simple but not supported everywhere
    – Owow
    Aug 12, 2020 at 9:12
  • 1
    That's a lot better than the other solutions which do not display the name of selected file(s). But how to change the text "Choose Files". A person really has to wonder about the competence of the people behind HTML/CSS standards, who comes up with the stuff? So poorly done.
    – Gerry
    Oct 5, 2020 at 16:39
  • I only add that firefox has it own similar class ::file-selector-button
    – Robert
    Feb 6, 2021 at 2:25
24
 <label>
    <input type="file" />
 </label>

You can wrap your input type="file" inside of a label for the input. Style the label however you'd like and hide the input with display: none;

1
24

I am able to do it with pure CSS using below code. I have used bootstrap and font-awesome.

<link href="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/twitter-bootstrap/3.3.7/css/bootstrap.min.css" rel="stylesheet" />
<link href="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/font-awesome/4.7.0/css/font-awesome.css" rel="stylesheet" />

<label class="btn btn-default btn-sm center-block btn-file">
  <i class="fa fa-upload fa-2x" aria-hidden="true"></i>
  <input type="file" style="display: none;">
</label>

23

::file-selector-button

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/::file-selector-button

This is a new selector that can be used to style the file selector button. It has full support on recent browser versions.

input[type=file]::file-selector-button {
  border: 2px solid #6c5ce7;
  padding: .2em .4em;
  border-radius: .2em;
  background-color: #a29bfe;
  transition: 1s;
}

input[type=file]::file-selector-button:hover {
  background-color: #81ecec;
  border: 2px solid #00cec9;
}
<form>
  <label for="fileUpload">Upload file</label>
  <input type="file" id="fileUpload">
</form>

I felt that this answer was needed as most answers here are outdated.

1
  • 1
    I was going to write this answer. This should be the accepted answer. You can also just write: ::file-selector-button { }
    – mikael1000
    Jan 17 at 14:43
16

This approach gives you the whole flexibility! ES6 / VanillaJS!

html:

<input type="file" style="display:none;"></input>
<button>Upload file</button>

javascript:

document.querySelector('button').addEventListener('click', () => {
  document.querySelector('input[type="file"]').click();
});

This hides the input-file button, but under the hood clicks it from another normal button, that you can obviously style like any other button. This is the only solution with no downside apart from a useless DOM-node. Thanks to display:none;, the input-button does not reserve any visible space in the DOM.

(I don't know anymore to whom to give props for this. But I got that idea from somewhere here on Stackoverflow.)

15

Put upload file button over your nice button or element and hide it.

Very simple and will work on any browser

<div class="upload-wrap">
    <button type="button" class="nice-button">upload_file</button>
    <input type="file" name="file" class="upload-btn">
</div>

Styles

.upload-wrap {
    position: relative;
}

.upload-btn {
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    opacity: 0;
}
1
  • 1
    This is brilliant, thank you. Talk about minimal engineering to achieve the best result!
    – Tsar Bomba
    Jan 28 at 18:50
14

Here is a solution which doesn't really style the <input type="file" /> element but instead uses a <input type="file" /> element on top of other elements (which can be styled). The <input type="file" /> element is not really visible hence, the overall illusion is of a nicely styled file upload control.

I came across this problem recently and despite the plethora of answers on Stack Overflow, none really seemed to fit the bill. In the end, I ended up customizing this so as to have a simple and an elegant solution.

I have also tested this on Firefox, IE (11, 10 & 9), Chrome and Opera, iPad and a few android devices.

Here's the JSFiddle link -> http://jsfiddle.net/umhva747/

$('input[type=file]').change(function(e) {
    $in = $(this);
    $in.next().html($in.val());
    
});

$('.uploadButton').click(function() {
    var fileName = $("#fileUpload").val();
    if (fileName) {
        alert(fileName + " can be uploaded.");
    }
    else {
        alert("Please select a file to upload");
    }
});
body {
    background-color:Black;
}

div.upload {
    background-color:#fff;
    border: 1px solid #ddd;
    border-radius:5px;
    display:inline-block;
    height: 30px;
    padding:3px 40px 3px 3px;
    position:relative;
    width: auto;
}

div.upload:hover {
    opacity:0.95;
}

div.upload input[type="file"] {
    display: input-block;
    width: 100%;
    height: 30px;
    opacity: 0;
    cursor:pointer;
    position:absolute;
    left:0;
}
.uploadButton {
    background-color: #425F9C;
    border: none;
    border-radius: 3px;
    color: #FFF;
    cursor:pointer;
    display: inline-block;
    height: 30px;
    margin-right:15px;
    width: auto;
    padding:0 20px;
    box-sizing: content-box;
}

.fileName {
    font-family: Arial;
    font-size:14px;
}

.upload + .uploadButton {
    height:38px;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.9.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<form action="" method="post" enctype="multipart/form-data">
    <div class="upload">
        <input type="button" class="uploadButton" value="Browse" />
        <input type="file" name="upload" accept="image/*" id="fileUpload" />
        <span class="fileName">Select file..</span>
    </div>
    <input type="button" class="uploadButton" value="Upload File" />
</form>

Hope this helps!!!

1
  • 2
    An ingeniously clever solution to this nefarious file upload styling shenanigans.
    – rmcsharry
    Sep 10, 2016 at 18:26
13

This is simple with jquery. To give a code example of Ryan's suggestion with a slight modification.

Basic html:

<div id="image_icon"></div>
<div id="filename"></div>
<input id="the_real_file_input" name="foobar" type="file">

Be sure to set the styling on the input when you're ready: opacity: 0 You can't set display: none because it needs to be clickable. But you can position it under the "new" button or tuck in under something else with z-index if you prefer.

Setup some jquery to click the real input when you click the image.

$('#image_icon').click(function() {
    $('#the_real_file_input').click();
});

Now your button is working. Just cut and paste the value when changed.

$('input[type=file]').bind('change', function() {
    var str = "";
    str = $(this).val();
    $("#filename").text(str);
}).change();

Tah dah! You may need to parse the val() to something more meaningful but you should be all set.

2
  • 1
    this will fail with FF11 - reason: since you cannot precisely influence size of input field (only by using html size) and button (you can set height using css), if your visible input field is larger than original FF provides us with, you are left with a very big blind area - user standpoint: in most cases he'll complain that upload does not work, when clicked
    – Jeffz
    Mar 31, 2012 at 23:10
  • 2
    Good idea but this will not work on IE. $('#the_real_file_input').click() will trigger open dialog but file will not be selected into a form and upload will fail.
    – Tomas
    Aug 21, 2012 at 12:04
11

Here is a PURE CSS, Javascript-free, Bootstrap-free, 100% cross-browser solution! Just cut-and-paste one block of styles, then test your file upload control.

This solution does not attempt to hide then recreate the original HTML element like the other posts here do. It uses plain CSS without any circus tricks or third party tools to style the original file upload form control for all the major browsers. You do not need to even change your HTML code!

This is what the file upload control looks like in Firefox, Chrome, and Edge using the CSS below. This is a very simple clean design. You can change it to look any way you like:

enter image description here

Internet Explorer gives you limited design control, but at least you can manipulate the control using CSS enough to change a few things, including rounded borders and colors:

enter image description here

<style>
/* Note: This CSS will style all instances of 
   <input type=file /> controls in your website. */
input[type="file"],
input[type="file"]:visited,
input[type="file"]:hover,
input[type="file"]:focus,
input[type="file"]:active {
    margin:0;
    padding: 0em 0em;
    padding: 0rem 0rem;
    overflow: hidden; /* long file names overflow so just hide the end */
    background: #ffffff;
    border-radius: .2em;
    border-radius: .2rem;
    outline: none;
    border: 2px solid #bbb;
    cursor: pointer;
    -webkit-appearance: textfield;
    -moz-appearance: textfield;
}

input[type="file"]:hover {
    background: #f9f9ff; /* I am using a light blue to indicate an interaction */
    border: 2px solid #999;
}

input[type="file"]:visited,
input[type="file"]:focus,
input[type="file"]:active {
    background: #fff; /* Default back to white when focused. */
    border: 2px solid #999;
}

/* Note: Firefox flags the file name box as a *readonly* input. So that attribute selector was added below. Note: These selectors blow up in IE so have to be separated from the same styles above. */
input[type="file"]:disabled,
input[type="file"]:read-only {
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0em 0em;
    padding: 0rem 0rem;
    overflow: hidden; /* long file names overflow so just hide the end */
    background: #ffffff;
    border-radius: .2em;
    border-radius: .2rem;
    outline: none;
    border: 2px solid #bbb;
    cursor: pointer;
    -webkit-appearance: textfield;
    -moz-appearance: textfield;
}

input[type="file"]:disabled:hover,
input[type="file"]:read-only:hover {
    background: #f9f9ff; /* I am using a light blue to indicate an interaction */
    border: 2px solid #999;
}

input[type="file"]:disabled:visited,
input[type="file"]:disabled:focus,
input[type="file"]:disabled:active,
input[type="file"]:read-only:visited,
input[type="file"]:read-only:focus,
input[type="file"]:read-only:active {
    background: #fff; /* Default back to white when focused. */
    border: 2px solid #999;
}

/* IE UPLOAD BUTTON STYLE: This attempts to alter the file upload button style in IE.  Keep in mind IE gives you limited design control but at least you can customize its upload button.*/
::-ms-browse { /* IE */
    display: inline-block;
    margin: 0;
    padding: .2em .5em;
    padding: .2rem .5rem;
    text-align: center;
    outline: none;
    border: none;
    background: #fff;
    white-space: nowrap;
    cursor: pointer;
}
/* FIREFOX UPLOAD BUTTON STYLE */
::file-selector-button {/* firefox */
    display: inline-block;
    margin: 0rem 1rem 0rem 0rem;
    padding: .18em .5em;
    padding: .18rem .5rem;
    -webkit-appearance: button;
    text-align: center;
    border-radius: .1rem 0rem 0rem .1rem;
    outline: none;
    border: none;
    border-right: 2px solid #bbb;
    background: #eee;
    white-space: nowrap;
    cursor: pointer;
}
/* CHROME AND EDGE UPLOAD BUTTON STYLE */
::-webkit-file-upload-button { /* chrome and edge */
    display: inline-block;
    margin: 0rem 1rem 0rem 0rem;
    padding: .19em .5em;
    padding: .19rem .5rem;
    -webkit-appearance: button;
    text-align: center;
    border-radius: .1rem 0rem 0rem .1rem;
    outline: none;
    border: none;
    border-right: 2px solid #bbb;
    background: #eee;
    white-space: nowrap;
    cursor: pointer;
}
</style>

The advantages to my solution are:

  1. You stick with simple CSS to style the original HTML input control
  2. You can see one or more file names in the file input textbox
  3. Screen readers and ARIA-friendly devices can interact normally with your file upload control
  4. You can set tabindex on your HTML element so its part of the tab order
  5. Because you are using plain HTML and CSS, your file input button works perfectly in old and new browsers
  6. ZERO JavaScript required!
  7. Runs and loads lighting fast in even the oldest of browsers
  8. Because your are not using "display:none" to hide the control, its file block stream data is never disabled from reaching the server in any old or new browser version known

You do not need goofy JavaScript tricks, Bootstrap, or to try and hide/recreate your file input control. That just destroys usability for everyone online. Styling the original HTML control means your file upload control is guaranteed to work well in 25 years worth of web browsers, old and new.

This is why you cannot trust all these scripted hacks here that erase, rewrite, or destroy HTML just to try and recreate some visual experience. That shows that you do not understand how HTML is used or why its been around for 30 years practically unchanged. You should never try and rewrite HTML's native form control functionality. Why? There is more to using natural HTML in websites than just manipulation of markup for some forced visual experience. The trade-offs of limited visual design in these replaced HTML elements was designed that way for a reason.

My advice: Stay with simple HTML and CSS solutions and you will have ZERO problems as a web developer.

1
  • 1
    This is the real deal! Thanks a lot! (for others: the button text cannot be changed directly or using :after and :before on the input element, it needs a separate element with pointer-events: none; on top of the button. Mar 26, 2021 at 22:48
8

the only way i can think of is to find the button with javascript after it gets rendered and assign a style to it

you might also look at this writeup

1
  • Pure CSS, no JavaScript, works in all browsers down to ie7 - awesome! Jun 6, 2013 at 12:37
8
<input type="file" name="media" style="display-none" onchange="document.media.submit()">

I would normally use simple javascript to customize the file input tag.A hidden input field,on click of button,javascript call the hidden field,simple solution with out any css or bunch of jquery.

<button id="file" onclick="$('#file').click()">Upload File</button>
1
  • 1
    you can't use click() method to fire event for input type file. most of the browser doesn't allow for security reason .
    – Mahi
    Dec 29, 2016 at 9:37
8

VISIBILITY:hidden TRICK

I usually go for the visibility:hidden trick

this is my styled button

<div id="uploadbutton" class="btn btn-success btn-block">Upload</div>

this is the input type=file button. Note the visibility:hidden rule

<input type="file" id="upload" style="visibility:hidden;">

this is the JavaScript bit to glue them together. It works

<script>
 $('#uploadbutton').click(function(){
    $('input[type=file]').click();
 });
 </script>
5
  • 1
    you can't use click() method to fire event for input type file. most of the browser doesn't allow for security reason
    – Mahi
    Dec 29, 2016 at 9:37
  • even using jquery? is that correct? how would you do it instead? Dec 29, 2016 at 10:42
  • stackoverflow.com/questions/210643/…
    – Mahi
    Dec 29, 2016 at 17:04
  • style="visibility:hidden" is too long, simply use hidden. Also, click() does work for any browsers and there is no veryfiable security reason as of now and on any devices it's the legit way and @Gianluca for classic jQuery use trigger() Jun 9, 2017 at 16:34
  • 1
    This is precisely the solution I was going to add to this! It work and you can display it precisely how you want to. Works with Chrome, will try others. Jul 12, 2017 at 10:28
8

Multiple file solution with converted filename

Bootstrap EXAMPLE

HTML:

<div>
  <label class="btn btn-primary search-file-btn">
    <input name="file1" type="file" style="display:None;"> <span>Choose file</span>
  </label>
  <span>No file selected</span>
</div>

<div>
  <label class="btn btn-primary search-file-btn">
    <input name="file2" type="file" style="display:None;"> <span>Choose file</span>
  </label>
  <span>No file selected</span>
</div>

1. JS with jQuery:

$().ready(function($){
    $('.search-file-btn').children("input").bind('change', function() {
    var fileName = '';
    fileName = $(this).val().split("\\").slice(-1)[0];
    $(this).parent().next("span").html(fileName);
  })
});

2. JS without jQuery

Array.prototype.forEach.call(document.getElementsByTagName('input'), function(item) {
  item.addEventListener("change", function() {
    var fileName = '';
    fileName = this.value.split("\\").slice(-1)[0];
    this.parentNode.nextElementSibling.innerHTML = fileName;
  });
});
6

Here we use a span to trigger input of type file and we simply customized that span, so we can add any styling using this way.

Note that we use input tag with visibility:hidden option and trigger it in the span.

.attachFileSpan{
color:#2b6dad;
cursor:pointer;
}
.attachFileSpan:hover{
text-decoration: underline;
}
<h3> Customized input of type file </h3>
<input id="myInput" type="file" style="visibility:hidden"/>

        <span title="attach file" class="attachFileSpan" onclick="document.getElementById('myInput').click()">
        Attach file
        </span>

Reference

5

Here is a solution, that also shows the chosen file name: http://jsfiddle.net/raft9pg0/1/

HTML:

<label for="file-upload" class="custom-file-upload">Chose file</label>
<input id="file-upload" type="file"/>
File: <span id="file-upload-value">-</span>

JS:

$(function() {
    $("input:file[id=file-upload]").change(function() {
        $("#file-upload-value").html( $(this).val() );
    });
});

CSS:

input[type="file"] {
    display: none;
}

.custom-file-upload {
      background: #ddd;
      border: 1px solid #aaa;
      border-top: 1px solid #ccc;
      border-left: 1px solid #ccc;
      -moz-border-radius: 3px;
      -webkit-border-radius: 3px;
      border-radius: 3px;
      color: #444;
      display: inline-block;
      font-size: 11px;
      font-weight: bold;
      text-decoration: none;
      text-shadow: 0 1px rgba(255, 255, 255, .75);
      cursor: pointer;
      margin-bottom: 20px;
      line-height: normal;
      padding: 8px 10px; }
1
  • How to solely display the file name, and not the fakepath path? Oct 29, 2017 at 1:42
5

This is a nice way to do it with material / angular file upload. You could do the same with a bootstrap button.

Note I used <a> instead of <button> this allows the click events to bubble up.

<label>
    <input type="file" (change)="setFile($event)" style="display:none" />

    <a mat-raised-button color="primary">
      <mat-icon>file_upload</mat-icon>
      Upload Document
    </a>

  </label>
1
  • 1
    This works great in angular 2+. Not sure why it's down voted. If you're using angular this is the simplest solution available. Dec 2, 2017 at 11:22
4

Maybe a lot of awnsers. But I like this in pure CSS with fa-buttons:

.divs {
    position: relative;
    display: inline-block;
    background-color: #fcc;
}

.inputs {
    position:absolute;
    left: 0px;
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
    opacity: 0;
    background: #00f;
    z-index:999;
}

.icons {
    position:relative;
}
<div class="divs">
<input type='file' id='image' class="inputs">
<i class="fa fa-image fa-2x icons"></i>
</div>

<div class="divs">
<input type='file' id='book' class="inputs">
<i class="fa fa-book fa-5x icons"></i>
</div>
<br><br><br>
<div class="divs">
<input type='file' id='data' class="inputs">
<i class="fa fa-id-card fa-3x icons"></i>
</div>





<link href="https://maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com/font-awesome/4.7.0/css/font-awesome.min.css" rel="stylesheet"/>

Fiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/zoutepopcorn/v2zkbpay/1/

4

Don't be fooled by "great" CSS-only solutions that are actually very browser-specific, or that overlay the styled button on top of the real button, or that force you to use a <label> instead of a <button>, or any other such hack. JavaScript IS necessary to get it working for general usage. Please study how gmail and DropZone do it if you don't believe me.

Just style a normal button however you want, then call a simple JS function to create and link a hidden input element to your styled button.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<meta charset="utf-8">

<style>
    button {
        width            : 160px;
        height           : 30px;
        font-size        : 13px;
        border           : none;
        text-align       : center;
        background-color : #444;
        color            : #6f0;
    }
    button:active {
        background-color : #779;
    }
</style>

<button id="upload">Styled upload button!</button>

<script>

function Upload_On_Click(id, handler) {
    var hidden_input = null;
    document.getElementById(id).onclick = function() {hidden_input.click();}
    function setup_hidden_input() {
        hidden_input && hidden_input.parentNode.removeChild(hidden_input);
        hidden_input = document.createElement("input");
        hidden_input.setAttribute("type", "file");
        hidden_input.style.visibility = "hidden";
        document.querySelector("body").appendChild(hidden_input);
        hidden_input.onchange = function() {
            handler(hidden_input.files[0]);
            setup_hidden_input();
        };
    }
    setup_hidden_input();
}

Upload_On_Click("upload", function(file) {
    console.log("GOT FILE: " + file.name);
});

</script>

Notice how the above code re-links it after every time the user chooses a file. This is important because "onchange" is only called if the user changes the filename. But you probably want to get the file every time the user provides it.

1
  • 1
    To be exact, the label approach does work, except it can't show the selected file name or path. So necessarily speaking, that's the only issue one needs JS to solve. Oct 29, 2017 at 0:59
4

Update Nevermind, this doesn't work in IE or it's new brother, FF. Works on every other type of element as expected, but doesn't work on file inputs. A much better way to do this is to just create a file input and a label that links to it. Make the file input display none and boom, it works in IE9+ seamlessly.

Warning: Everything below this is crap!

By using pseudo elements positioned/sized against their container, we can get by with only one input file (no additional markup needed), and style as per usual.

Demo

<input type="file" class="foo">
<style>
    .foo {
        display: block;
        position: relative;
        width: 300px;
        margin: auto;
        cursor: pointer;
        border: 0;
        height: 60px;
        border-radius: 5px;
        outline: 0;
    }
    .foo:hover:after {
        background: #5978f8;
    }
    .foo:after {
        transition: 200ms all ease;
        border-bottom: 3px solid rgba(0,0,0,.2);
        background: #3c5ff4;
        text-shadow: 0 2px 0 rgba(0,0,0,.2);
        color: #fff;
        font-size: 20px;
        text-align: center;
        position: absolute;
        top: 0;
        left: 0;
        width: 100%;
        height: 100%;
        display: block;
        content: 'Upload Something';
        line-height: 60px;
        border-radius: 5px;
    }
</style>

Enjoy guys!

Old Update

Turned this into a Stylus mixin. Should be easy enough for one of you cool SCSS cats to convert it.

    file-button(button_width = 150px)
      display block
      position relative
      margin auto
      cursor pointer
      border 0
      height 0
      width 0
      outline none
      &:after
        position absolute
        top 0
        text-align center
        display block
        width button_width
        left -(button_width / 2)

Usage:

<input type="file">

input[type="file"]
    file-button(200px)
1
  • 1
    ROTFLMAO @ IE's new brother FF Apr 29, 2018 at 12:45
3

I've found a very easy method to switch the file button to a picture. You just label a picture and place it on top of the file button.

<html>
<div id="File button">
    <div style="position:absolute;">
        <!--This is your labeled image-->
        <label for="fileButton"><img src="ImageURL"></label>
    </div>
    <div>
        <input type="file" id="fileButton"/>
    </div>
</div>
</html>

When clicking on the labeled image, you select the file button.

3

This week I also needed to custom the button and display the selected file name aside it, so after reading some of the answers above (Thanks BTW) I came up with the following implementation:

HTML:

<div class="browse">
<label id="uploadBtn" class="custom-file-upload">Choose file
<input type="file" name="fileInput" id="fileInput" accept=".yaml" ngf-select ngf-change="onFileSelect($files)" />
</label>
<span>{{fileName}}</span>
</div>

CSS

   input[type='file'] {
    color: #a1bbd5;
    display: none;

}

.custom-file-upload {
    border: 1px solid #a1bbd5;
    display: inline-block;
    padding: 2px 8px;
    cursor: pointer;
}

label{
    color: #a1bbd5;
    border-radius: 3px;
}

Javascript (Angular)

app.controller('MainCtrl', function($scope) {

        $scope.fileName = 'No file chosen';

          $scope.onFileSelect = function ($files) {
          $scope.selectedFile = $files;
          $scope.fileName = $files[0].name;
    };
});

Basically I'm working with ng-file-upload lib, Angular-wise I'm binding the filename to my $scope and giving it the initial value of 'No file chosen', I'm also binding the onFileSelect() function to my scope so when a file gets selected I'm getting the filename using ng-upload API and assign it to the $scope.filename.

3

Simply simulate a click on the <input> by using the trigger() function when clicking on a styled <div>. I created my own button out of a <div> and then triggered a click on the input when clicking my <div>. This allows you to create your button however you want because it's a <div> and simulates a click on your file <input>. Then use display: none on your <input>.

// div styled as my load file button
<div id="simClick">Load from backup</div>

<input type="file" id="readFile" />

// Click function for input
$("#readFile").click(function() {
    readFile();
});

// Simulate click on the input when clicking div
$("#simClick").click(function() {
    $("#readFile").trigger("click");
});

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