55

I am able to avoid the implicit conversion of a constructor using the explicit keyword. So now, conversions like A a1 = 10; can be avoided.

But still I can initialize A a1 = A(20.2);. How can I disable the object creation such that an object can only be created if we pass an integer as a parameter e.g. A a1 = A(10)?

#include <iostream>

class A
{
public:
    explicit A(int a)
    {
        num = a;
    }

    int num;
};

int main()
{
    A a1 = A(10.0);
    std::cout << a1.num;
    return 0;
}
74

You can delete A::A(<anything not an int>);:

struct A
{
    explicit A(int a)
    : num(a)
    {}

    template<class T>
    A(T) = delete;

    int num;
};

int main()
{
    //A a1=A(10.0); // error: use of deleted function 'A::A(T) [with T = double]'
    A a2 = A(10); // OK
    (void) a2;
}

Demo: https://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/425afc19003697c9

  • 5
    @Alexander C++ is one of the oldest high level languages that still sees active use in new projects. The only languages that are older and still actively used AFAIK are FORTRAN, COBOL and LISP. A consequence of that is that C++ has A LOT more flexibility than younger languages like Java or C#, but that flexibility comes at the cost of being a lot easier to screw something up. – Nzall Aug 1 at 13:24
  • 4
    @Alexander "implicit-conversion-by-default sounds crazy to me" It sounds crazy to all C++ developpers. But the choice to do so has been made eons ago and we're now all paying the price. – YSC Aug 1 at 15:23
  • 7
    @Nzall Are you suggesting that C is not used much in new projects? Or that it's not a high level language? – Barmar Aug 1 at 17:17
  • 8
    @Nzall I've been programming for over 40 years, I'm proficient in about a half dozen languages and familiar with many more. Modern C++ seems to be in a class by itself in terms of complexity (I remember thinking similarly about Ada when it first came out, but C++ far eclipses that). But I guess that's a testament to its popularity -- they wouldn't keep adding on to it if no one cared. – Barmar Aug 1 at 18:45
  • 4
    @Barmar Quite literally; template syntax on its own is Turing-complete. The C++ parser is subject to the halting problem. – chrylis -on strike- Aug 2 at 16:48
30

The way to achieve this is to provide another constructor that would be a better match, and then delete it so you'll get an error. For your class, adding

template <typename T>
A(T) = delete;

Will stop the class from being constructed from anything that isn't an int

8

You can circumvent this problem by using braced initialization. For example:

struct A {
  A(int _a) : a(_a) {}
  int a;
};

A a{5}; // ok
A b{1.123}; // compile error

Proof

6

I just want to add that the A(double) = delete is a C++11 addition.

If for whatever reason you cannot use this relatively new construct, you can simply declare it as private as this:

class A{
  public:
    A(int);
  private:
    A(double);
}
5

To avoid int->double conversions everywhere, not only in your case. With g++ you can use -Wconversion -Werror. Note that it'll be allowed in your particular case, because the compiler understands that 10.0 is literal, but it will fail compilation for:

class A
{
public:
    explicit A(int a)
    {
        num = a;
    }

    int num;
};

int main()
{
    double x = 10;
    A a1 = A(x);
    static_cast<void>(a1);
    return 0;
}

Compiler explorer

4

Explicitly delete the constructor for double (possibly add float):

A(double) = delete;
4

You should use the -Wconversion flag of gcc, that will generate a warning when implicitly casting a float to an int. Add -Werror to transform this warning (all in fact) into an error.

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