2

I'd like to use the fact that pmax(x, 0) = (x + abs(x)) / 2 on an integer vector using Rcpp for performance.

I've written a naive implementation:

IntegerVector do_pmax0_abs_int(IntegerVector x) {
  R_xlen_t n = x.length();
  IntegerVector out(clone(x));
  for (R_xlen_t i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
    int oi = out[i];
    out[i] += abs(oi);
    out[i] /= 2;
  }
  return out;
}

which is indeed performant; however, it invokes undefined behaviour should x contains any element larger than .Machine$integer.max / 2.

Is there a way to quickly determine whether or not the vector would be less than .Machine$integer.max / 2? I considered a bit-shifting but this would not be valid for negative numbers.

3
  • 1
    Have you considered int64_t for intermediate results? Aug 1 '19 at 14:22
  • I have not. Thanks for the suggestion! Would it just require an extra coercion step at the end of the for loop?
    – Hugh
    Aug 1 '19 at 14:24
  • I suggest this package I'd read link Aug 1 '19 at 22:44
1

As mentioned in the comments you can make use of int64_t for intermediate results. In addition, it makes sense to not copy x to out and don't initilize out to zero everywhere:

#include <Rcpp.h>
using namespace Rcpp;

// [[Rcpp::export]]
IntegerVector do_pmax0_abs_int(IntegerVector x) {
    R_xlen_t n = x.length();
    IntegerVector out(clone(x));
    for (R_xlen_t i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
        int oi = out[i];
        out[i] += abs(oi);
        out[i] /= 2;
    }
    return out;
}

// [[Rcpp::plugins(cpp11)]]
// [[Rcpp::export]]
IntegerVector do_pmax0_abs_int64(IntegerVector x) {
    R_xlen_t n = x.length();
    IntegerVector out = no_init(n);
    for (R_xlen_t i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
        int64_t oi = x[i];
        oi += std::abs(oi);
        out[i] = static_cast<int>(oi / 2);
    }
    return out;
}

/***R
ints <- as.integer(sample.int(.Machine$integer.max, 1e6) - 2^30)
bench::mark(do_pmax0_abs_int(ints),
            do_pmax0_abs_int64(ints),
            pmax(ints, 0))[, 1:5]

ints <- 2L * ints
bench::mark(#do_pmax0_abs_int(ints), 
            do_pmax0_abs_int64(ints), 
            pmax(ints, 0))[, 1:5]
*/

Result:

> Rcpp::sourceCpp('57310889/code.cpp')

> ints <- as.integer(sample.int(.Machine$integer.max, 1e6) - 2^30)

> bench::mark(do_pmax0_abs_int(ints),
+             do_pmax0_abs_int64(ints),
+             pmax(ints, 0))[, 1:5]
# A tibble: 3 x 5
  expression                    min   median `itr/sec` mem_alloc
  <bch:expr>               <bch:tm> <bch:tm>     <dbl> <bch:byt>
1 do_pmax0_abs_int(ints)     1.91ms   3.31ms     317.     3.82MB
2 do_pmax0_abs_int64(ints)   1.28ms   2.67ms     432.     3.82MB
3 pmax(ints, 0)              9.85ms  10.68ms      86.9   15.26MB

> ints <- 2L * ints

> bench::mark(#do_pmax0_abs_int(ints), 
+             do_pmax0_abs_int64(ints), 
+             pmax(ints, 0))[, 1:5]
# A tibble: 2 x 5
  expression                    min   median `itr/sec` mem_alloc
  <bch:expr>               <bch:tm> <bch:tm>     <dbl> <bch:byt>
1 do_pmax0_abs_int64(ints)   1.28ms   2.52ms     439.     3.82MB
2 pmax(ints, 0)              9.88ms  10.83ms      89.5   15.26MB

Notes:

  • Without no_init the two C++ methods are equally fast.
  • I ave removed the original method from the second benchmark, since bench::mark compares the results by default, and the original method produces wrong results for that particular input.
2
  • 1
    @Hugh Actually it is even faster to just go through the vector and find the maximum value at each step, c.f. stubner.me/2019/08/xy-problems. Aug 2 '19 at 18:12
  • Thanks @Ralf! I concur with your link's conclusion with the lambda function. I was comparing the abs trick with branching every iteration: if (x[i] < 0) out[i] = 0. I worked out that calculating the maximum then doing the abs trick was faster than the branching method alone, and knew that ABS() was implemented at a very low level, so assumed that it was the fastest method.
    – Hugh
    Sep 10 '19 at 16:43

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