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Is it possible to get the start time of an old running process? It seems that ps will report the date (not the time) if it wasn't started today, and only the year if it wasn't started this year. Is the precision lost forever for old processes?

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  • 23
    Is there anything wrong with using ps -p <pid> -o lstart? Seems like it works, but I'm not sure why it's not the immediate obvious answer for the many times this question seems to come up.
    – ajwood
    Apr 20 '11 at 16:07
  • 12
    @ajwood It would be better to use ps -p <pid> -o lstart= to avoid additional line (header) to be printed. Jan 15 '14 at 15:27
  • 2
    Is there anything wrong with using ps -p <pid> -o lstart? Maybe the fact there's no lstart neither in 2004 Edition nor in 2013 Edition of POSIX 1003.1 standard? Mar 6 '14 at 14:21
  • 6
    @PiotrDobrogost, that would be a problem if the question asked about POSIX, but it's asking about Linux.
    – womble
    Dec 1 '14 at 1:13
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    Mods - techraf, Makyen, David Rawson, Tsyvarev, Paul Roub - why don't you move it to a more appropriate site such as StackExchange or Superuser instead of closing the question? This is a good and useful question
    – Hanxue
    Jul 19 '19 at 2:12
469

You can specify a formatter and use lstart, like this command:

ps -eo pid,lstart,cmd

The above command will output all processes, with formatters to get PID, command run, and date+time started.

Example (from Debian/Jessie command line)

$ ps -eo pid,lstart,cmd
  PID CMD                                          STARTED
    1 Tue Jun  7 01:29:38 2016 /sbin/init                  
    2 Tue Jun  7 01:29:38 2016 [kthreadd]                  
    3 Tue Jun  7 01:29:38 2016 [ksoftirqd/0]               
    5 Tue Jun  7 01:29:38 2016 [kworker/0:0H]              
    7 Tue Jun  7 01:29:38 2016 [rcu_sched]                 
    8 Tue Jun  7 01:29:38 2016 [rcu_bh]                    
    9 Tue Jun  7 01:29:38 2016 [migration/0]               
   10 Tue Jun  7 01:29:38 2016 [kdevtmpfs]                 
   11 Tue Jun  7 01:29:38 2016 [netns]                     
  277 Tue Jun  7 01:29:38 2016 [writeback]                 
  279 Tue Jun  7 01:29:38 2016 [crypto]                    
      ...

You can read ps's manpage or check Opengroup's page for the other formatters.

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    @bobbyrne01: change the order, e.g. pid,etime,cmd works for me on Debian Wheezy.
    – exic
    Jan 14 '14 at 8:50
  • 3
    @Gobliins - etime is the time elapsed since the process was started.
    – 逆さま
    Jun 6 '16 at 13:42
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    for completeness, for those used to BSD syntax: ps axo pid,cmd,lstart also works Oct 12 '16 at 7:50
  • 2
    @bobbyme01: use the -ww option
    – Ed Randall
    Jan 17 '17 at 15:02
  • 1
    Be aware that lstart time can change, the stat methods below are safer - unix.stackexchange.com/questions/274610/….
    – slm
    Jun 20 '19 at 15:13
44

The ps command (at least the procps version used by many Linux distributions) has a number of format fields that relate to the process start time, including lstart which always gives the full date and time the process started:

# ps -p 1 -wo pid,lstart,cmd
  PID                  STARTED CMD
    1 Mon Dec 23 00:31:43 2013 /sbin/init

# ps -p 1 -p $$ -wo user,pid,%cpu,%mem,vsz,rss,tty,stat,lstart,cmd
USER       PID %CPU %MEM    VSZ   RSS TT       STAT                  STARTED CMD
root         1  0.0  0.1   2800  1152 ?        Ss   Mon Dec 23 00:31:44 2013 /sbin/init
root      5151  0.3  0.1   4732  1980 pts/2    S    Sat Mar  8 16:50:47 2014 bash

For a discussion of how the information is published in the /proc filesystem, see https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/7870/how-to-check-how-long-a-process-has-been-running

(In my experience under Linux, the time stamp on the /proc/ directories seem to be related to a moment when the virtual directory was recently accessed rather than the start time of the processes:

# date; ls -ld /proc/1 /proc/$$ 
Sat Mar  8 17:14:21 EST 2014
dr-xr-xr-x 7 root root 0 2014-03-08 16:50 /proc/1
dr-xr-xr-x 7 root root 0 2014-03-08 16:51 /proc/5151

Note that in this case I ran a "ps -p 1" command at about 16:50, then spawned a new bash shell, then ran the "ps -p 1 -p $$" command within that shell shortly afterward....)

1
  • To see every process (not just your own) add an e (standard ps syntax) or ax (BSD syntax) argument to the ps command: i.e. ps -ewo pid,lstart,cmd or ps -axwo pid,lstart,cmd Feb 3 '16 at 13:50
19

As a follow-up to Adam Matan's answer, the /proc/<pid> directory's time stamp as such is not necessarily directly useful, but you can use

awk -v RS=')' 'END{print $20}' /proc/12345/stat

to get the start time in clock ticks since system boot.1

This is a slightly tricky unit to use; see also convert jiffies to seconds for details.

awk -v ticks="$(getconf CLK_TCK)" 'NR==1 { now=$1; next }
    END { printf "%9.0f\n", now - ($20/ticks) }' /proc/uptime RS=')' /proc/12345/stat

This should give you seconds, which you can pass to strftime() to get a (human-readable, or otherwise) timestamp.

awk -v ticks="$(getconf CLK_TCK)" 'NR==1 { now=$1; next }
    END { print strftime("%c", systime() - (now-($20/ticks))) }' /proc/uptime RS=')' /proc/12345/stat

Updated with some fixes from Stephane Chazelas in the comments; thanks as always!

If you only have Mawk, maybe try

awk -v ticks="$(getconf CLK_TCK)" -v epoch="$(date +%s)" '
  NR==1 { now=$1; next }
  END { printf "%9.0f\n", epoch - (now-($20/ticks)) }' /proc/uptime RS=')' /proc/12345/stat |
xargs -i date -d @{}

1 man proc; search for starttime.

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ls -ltrh /proc | grep YOUR-PID-HERE

For example, my Google Chrome's PID is 11583:

ls -l /proc | grep 11583
dr-xr-xr-x  7 adam       adam                     0 2011-04-20 16:34 11583
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    This does not work for me - it prints modification time (changes frequently) Maybe because of this: unix.stackexchange.com/questions/20460/…
    – user920391
    Oct 28 '14 at 22:11
  • The timestamp of the /proc/<pid> is not reliable.
    – Henning
    Apr 26 '17 at 7:19
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    This returned a time 9 minutes later than when a process I have information about had actually started. Jun 5 '17 at 1:14
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    This seems to be my only option that works, though maybe not reliable. I'm on an embedded system that only has busybox ps which says invalid option for all the options mentioned by other answers.
    – Qi Fan
    Sep 7 '17 at 21:11
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    Why grep? Why not ls -ldh /proc/$pid? Or even better, date -r /proc/$pid?
    – Caesar
    Oct 25 '18 at 0:56
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    ps -eo pid,cmd,lstart | grep YOUR-PID-HERE
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    This will include it's own process too Jan 17 '19 at 10:25
6
 ps -eo pid,etime,cmd|sort -n -k2
0

use the command ls -ld /proc/process_id where process_id can be find using top command

0
$ ps -p 182454 -o lstart=
Mon Oct 18 17:26:44 2021

But can I get the answer in epoch seconds?

1
  • Not sure if ps can report that directly, but depending on your environment you can maybe use command substitution to convert it: date --date="$(ps -p 182454 -o lstart=)" '+%s'
    – ajwood
    Oct 18 at 16:34

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