10

Why does the compiler reject this code with the following error? (I am using VS 2017 with C# 7.3 enabled.)

CS0019 Operator '==' cannot be applied to operands of type 'T' and 'T'

public class GenericTest<T> where T : Enum
{
    public bool Compare(T a, T b)
    {
        return a == b;
    }
}

The version without generics is of course perfectly valid.

public enum A { ONE, TWO, THREE };

public class Test
{
    public bool Compare(A a, A b)
    {
        return a == b;
    }
}
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  • 6
    return a.Equals(b);? – Dmitry Bychenko Aug 2 '19 at 7:03
  • 5
    possible Duplicate stackoverflow.com/questions/390900/… – Anu Viswan Aug 2 '19 at 7:08
  • 1
    Interesting. class, MyClass, delegate, Type doesn't have this limitation, struct, enum, unmanaged, IMyInterface have. In other words it is only allowed if compiler can be sure it's reference type. – Sinatr Aug 2 '19 at 7:28
  • @DmitryBychenko: This works but I don't understand why. – Frank Puffer Aug 2 '19 at 7:31
  • 1
    @AnuViswan: The difference is that in my example the compiler should know it is an enum and thus should be comparable. – Frank Puffer Aug 2 '19 at 7:36
7

The compiler cannot rely on the operator == being implemented for every type provided for T. You could add a constraint to restrict T to class, but that would not allow you to use it for your enum, due to the enum not being a reference type. Adding struct as a constraint would also not allow you to use the operator because structs don't always have an implementation of the == operator, but you could use a.Equals(b) in that case instead.

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  • 1
    It's more than that. operator == has to be static, so it's not even part of the set of methods of T that could ever be used in a generic implementation. – Matthew Watson Aug 2 '19 at 7:50

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