1

In my ada's project I have 2 different libraries with base types. I found two different definition for a boolean :

Library A :

type Bool_Type is new Boolean;

Library B :

type T_BOOL8 is new Boolean;
for T_BOOL8'Size use 8;

So I have a question, what is the size used for Bool_Type ?

6

Compile with switch -gnatR2 to see its representation clause. For example:

main.adb

with Ada.Text_IO; use Ada.Text_IO;

procedure Main is

   type Bool_Type is new Boolean;

   type T_BOOL8 is new Boolean;
   for T_BOOL8'Size use 8;

begin

   Put_Line ("Bool_Type'Object_Size = " & Integer'Image (Bool_Type'Object_Size));
   Put_Line ("Bool_Type'Value_Size  = " & Integer'Image (Bool_Type'Value_Size));    
   Put_Line ("Bool_Type'Size        = " & Integer'Image (Bool_Type'Size));
   New_Line;

   Put_Line ("T_BOOL8'Object_Size   = " & Integer'Image (T_BOOL8'Object_Size));
   Put_Line ("T_BOOL8'Value_Size    = " & Integer'Image (T_BOOL8'Value_Size));    
   Put_Line ("T_BOOL8'Size          = " & Integer'Image (T_BOOL8'Size));
   New_Line;

end Main;

compiler output (partial):

Representation information for unit Main (body)
-----------------------------------------------

for Bool_Type'Object_Size use 8;
for Bool_Type'Value_Size use 1;
for Bool_Type'Alignment use 1;

for T_Bool8'Size use 8;
for T_Bool8'Alignment use 1;

program output

Bool_Type'Object_Size =  8
Bool_Type'Value_Size  =  1
Bool_Type'Size        =  1

T_BOOL8'Object_Size   =  8
T_BOOL8'Value_Size    =  8
T_BOOL8'Size          =  8

As can be seen, the number returned by the 'Size / 'Value_Size attribute for Bool_Type is equal to 1 (as required by the RM; see egilhh's answer). The attribute 'Size / 'Value_Size states the number of bits used to represent a value of the type. The 'Object_Size attribute, on the other hand, equals 8 bits (1 byte) and states the amount of bits used to store a value of the given type in memory (see Simon Wright's comment). See here and here for details.

Note that the number of bits indicated by 'Size / 'Value_Size must be sufficient to uniquely represent all possible values within the (discrete) type. For Boolean derived types, at least 1 bit is required, for an enumeration type with 3 values, for example, you need at least 2 bits.

An effect of explicitly setting the 'Size / 'Value_Size attribute can be observed when defining a packed array (as mentioned in G_Zeus’ answer):

type Bool_Array_Type is 
  array (Natural range 0 .. 7) of Bool_Type with Pack;

type T_BOOL8_ARRAY is 
  array (Natural range 0 .. 7) of T_BOOL8 with Pack;   

compiler output (partial):

Representation information for unit Main (body)
-------------------------------------------------

[...]

for Bool_Array_Type'Size use 8;
for Bool_Array_Type'Alignment use 1;
for Bool_Array_Type'Component_Size use 1;

[...]

for T_Bool8_Array'Size use 64;
for T_Bool8_Array'Alignment use 1;
for T_Bool8_Array'Component_Size use 8;

Because the number of bits used to represent a value of type T_BOOL8 is forced to be 8, the size of a single component of a packed array of T_BOOL8s will also be 8, and the total size of T_BOOL8_ARRAY will be 64 bits (8 bytes). Compare this to the total length of 8 bits (1 byte) for Bool_Array_Type.

7

Bool_Type will inherit the 'Size of Boolean, which is required to be 1, see RM 13.3(49)

2

You should find your answer (or enough information to find the answer to your specific question) in the Ada wikibooks entry for 'Size attribute.

Most likely Bool_Type has a the same size as Boolean, or 1 bit for the type (meaning you can pack Bool_Type elements in an array, for example) and 8 bits for instances (rounded up to full byte).

0

Whatever size the compiler wants, unless you override as in library B. Probably 8 bits but on some 32 bit RISC targets, 32 bits may be faster than 8. On a tiny microcontroller, 1 bit may save space.

The other answers let you find out for the specific target you compile for.

As your booleans are separate types, you need type conversions between them, providing hooks for the compiler to handle any format or size conversion without any further ado.

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