6

Typescript allows you to remove 'optionability' (?) with the -? mapped type modifier, made easily available to use with the Required<T> type.

type Required<T> = { [P in keyof T]-?: T[P] };

However it is important to note the following when using --strictNullChecks (as I am).

Note that in --strictNullChecks mode, when a homomorphic mapped type removes a ? modifier from a property in the underlying type it also removes undefined from the type of that property:

I'm looking for a way to bypass this side effect...

i.e. I want to remove the ? but if |undefined exists I want to retain it

Why?

I have server generated interfaces that have optional (?) properties. I want to refactor my server code and add/remove members. Therefore I want a way such that I am forced to explicitly set a value (or explicitly set to undefined) for every property whether required or not.

Dilemma:

  • If I use Required<T> then it swallows my | undefined but only if there is also a ? present.

So it's quite ironic that the following :

export type RequiredDog = Required <{

    bark: 'loud' | 'quiet' | undefined,
    bite?: 'nip' | 'clamp' | undefined
}>; 

actually becomes this:

type RequiredDog = {
    bark: "loud" | "quiet" | undefined;
    bite: "nip" | "clamp";
}

So bite which was MORE optional than bark is now actually LESS optional!

Is there a way to remove the ? without also removing the undefined ?

4
  • I've re-read your "Why?" paragraph four times, and I'm still not seeing why refactoring your server code adding/removing members leads to the conclusion that you want to have to explicitly write properties with the value undefined. The properties are optional. So...? (Sometimes, the "why" isn't important if the "how" question is clear [as it is here]. But here I think understanding the "why" may lead to the eventual answer to the question, which may not be quite the "how" requested... :-) ) Commented Aug 2, 2019 at 10:16
  • @T.J.Crowder It comes down to a couple things. Just because something is 'optional' at the end of the day (in the API) it doesn't mean you don't have to consider where the value comes from. Let's say I add Address3 - well that's optional sure - but I need to remember to set it if I'm actually using it. And what if I renamed it to AddressLine3. It gets trickier. What I want is just to make sure I haven't forgotten anything. The API may change and I want the compiler to tell me as much as possible. I get nervous when I add something or rename it and get no additional typescript errors!... Commented Aug 2, 2019 at 10:39
  • There are some subtleties between .NET and typescript/JS work with respect to just what required / nullable / undefined mean in the first place that definitely complicate things. I'm using Swagger code generation where I can use [JsonRequired] to prevent the ? being generated. The problem then is that while 'null' is distinct from undefined in typescript the .NET server doesn't make this distinction. So if I send null it blows up. So it has to be optional. Commented Aug 2, 2019 at 10:43
  • The actual problem I had (that led me to write this question) was I had some fields that originated on the server, were mapped via Pick<T> to another type and then eventually sent back to the server. If they're optional (which they were because of the .NET mismatch) then it's easy to forget to copy every field back. Inserting my SmartRequired<T> from my answer in the right place suddenly revealed what I was missing. (and I can now go to bed!) Commented Aug 2, 2019 at 10:46

4 Answers 4

10

If I were trying to implement a Required<> that doesn't strip undefined off of properties, I'd probably do it like this:

type RequiredKeepUndefined<T> = { [K in keyof T]-?: [T[K]] } extends infer U
  ? U extends Record<keyof U, [any]> ? { [K in keyof U]: U[K][0] } : never
  : never;

What I'm doing here with a bunch of mapped and conditional types is wrapping the value types in a one-tuple, making it Required, and then unwrapping the one-tuples. This is similar in spirit to your answer but it doesn't run afoul of what happens if someone uses "undefined" as a string literal in properties.

You can see it behave as desired:

interface Dog {
    bark: "loud" | "quiet" | undefined;
    bite?: "nip" | "clamp" | undefined;
}

type RequiredKeepUndefinedDog = RequiredKeepUndefined<Dog>
/* type RequiredKeepUndefinedDog = {
    bark: "loud" | "quiet" | undefined;
    bite: "nip" | "clamp" | undefined;
} */

You can think of it as the following transformations

  • {bark: "loud" | "quiet" | undefined, bite?: "nip" | "clamp" | undefined}
  • {bark: ["loud" | "quiet" | undefined], bite?: ["nip" | "clamp" | undefined] | undefined}
  • {bark: ["loud" | "quiet" | undefined], bite: ["nip" | "clamp" | undefined]}
  • {bark: "loud" | "quiet" | undefined, bite: "nip" | "clamp" | undefined}

Okay, hope that helps; good luck!

Link to code

1
  • This is great - thank you. As soon as I noticed 'bite' was 'less optional' after Required<T> I said to myself there's got to be a better way! Commented Aug 3, 2019 at 7:11
5

Here is what we use:

type RequiredWithUnknown<T> = {
  [K in keyof Required<T>]: T[K]
}

TS Playground

It should be easy to understand. But in short:
The type is getting all keys K of T. Due to the Required<T>, it really gets all the keys, even if they are optional. The values are then taken from T with these required keys.

It only works for the first level. Nested objects are untouched.

1
  • 1
    Smart! Loved this one, working perfectly as expected and a lot simpler than accepted answer. This should be higher right now Commented Oct 10, 2023 at 23:07
1

I would still love a cleaner solution, but the following seems to work:

I basically create a type called 'undefined' that I substitute / unsubstitute the real undefined type for with these two :

type WrapUndefined<T> = {
    [P in keyof T]: undefined extends T[P] ? 'undefined' | T[P] : T[P];
};

type UnwrapUndefined<T> = {
    [P in keyof T]: 'undefined' extends T[P] ? Diff<T[P], 'undefined'> | undefined : T[P];
};

So if I have:

type Person = {
   firstName?: string;
}

then WrapUndefined<Person> makes it

firstName?: string | undefined | 'undefined';     // *

You can then call Required<T> on this to get this:

firstName: string | 'undefined';    // 'undefined' doesn't get removed now

Then reverse it with UnwrapUndefined<T> to get

firstName: string | undefined;

So I then create a single type to do all this:

export type SmartRequired<T> = UnwrapUndefined<Required<WrapUndefined<T>>>;

If I run this on my original Dog type from the question I get what I wanted:

export type RequiredDog = SmartRequired <{

    bark: 'loud' | 'quiet' | undefined,
    bite?: 'nip' | 'clamp' | undefined
}>; 

Which is this

type RequiredDog = {
    bark: "loud" | "quiet" | undefined;
    bite: "nip" | "clamp" | undefined;
}

* Advanced note: This step shows in VSCode as being string | undefined because it seems like it is absorbing the 'undefined' into string. Fortunately when you run all three steps it ends up with the correct result.

3
  • PS. if you do find this useful - probably needs a better name than SmartRequired :-) Commented Aug 2, 2019 at 10:51
  • Then there's also RequiredPick<T, K extends keyof T> = UnwrapUndefined<Required<Pick<WrapUndefined<T>, K>>> Commented Aug 2, 2019 at 10:55
  • There is another scenario where we don't set explicitly the undefined type to a conditional property: type Person = { firstName?: string } Your approach output injects a desired undefined on the property. Is any approach to prevent it ?
    – colxi
    Commented Dec 5, 2020 at 10:14
1

Here's a refactor of @Simon_Weaver answer.

interface Dog {
    bark: "loud" | "quiet" | undefined;
    bite?: "nip" | "clamp" | undefined;
    howl?: "short" | "long";
}

type RequiredDog = Required<Dog>
/* type RequiredDog = {
    bark: "loud" | "quiet" | undefined;
    bite: "nip" | "clamp";
    howl: "short" | "long";
} */

declare const Undefined: unique symbol;
type Undefined = typeof Undefined;
type Mark<T> = undefined extends T ? Exclude<T, undefined> | Undefined : T;
type Unmark<T> = Undefined extends T ? Exclude<T, Undefined> | undefined : T;
type MarkProps<O> = { [P in keyof O]: Mark<O[P]> };
type UnmarkProps<O> = { [P in keyof O]: Unmark<O[P]> };
type RequiredKeepUndefined<O> = UnmarkProps<Required<MarkProps<O>>>;

type RequiredKeepUndefinedDog = RequiredKeepUndefined<Dog>
/* type RequiredKeepUndefinedDog = {
    bark: "loud" | "quiet" | undefined;
    bite: "nip" | "clamp" | undefined;
    howl: "stort" | "long" | undefined;
} */

Using a unique symbol type to mark undefineds makes it safe against collisions.

Breaking it down into more helpers makes it self explanatory.

Playground

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.