1

(using scala 2.11.12)

Why does this compile?

  sealed trait Inner

  sealed trait Outer {
    sealed trait I extends Inner
  }

  case object OuterA extends Outer {
    case object Inner1 extends I
    case object Inner2 extends I
  }

  case object OuterB extends Outer {
    case object Inner1 extends I
  }

  class Data[O <: Outer](outer: O, inner: O#I)
  // I expected this not to compile but it actually does
  val data = new Data(OuterA, OuterB.Inner1)

Why does this not compile?

  sealed trait Inner

  sealed trait Outer {
    type I <: Inner
  }

  case object OuterA extends Outer {
    sealed trait OuterAInner extends Inner
    override type I = OuterAInner
    case object Inner1 extends OuterAInner
    case object Inner2 extends OuterAInner
  }

  case object OuterB extends Outer {
    sealed trait OuterBInner extends Inner
    override type I = OuterBInner
    case object Inner1 extends OuterBInner
  }

  class Data[O <: Outer](outer: O, inner: O#I)
  // I expected this to compile but it actually does not
  val data = new Data(OuterA, OuterA.Inner1)
  // type mismatch;
  //   found   : com.transparencyrights.ermine.model.V1.OuterA.Inner1.type
  //   required: ?#I
  //  Note that Inner1 extends Any, not AnyRef.
  //  Such types can participate in value classes, but instances
  //  cannot appear in singleton types or in reference comparisons.
  //    val data = new Data(OuterA, OuterA.Inner1)

What I want to achieve is a unique Data constructor that takes two arguments, an Outer and an Inner, with the Inner type restricted to an Inner subtype dependent on the given Outer instance.

2

On both cases the problem is that O#I does not do what you want it to do.
It really does not refer to the I inside the specific O you have, but rather to the generic one inside Outer.

You can fix both snippets using Path dependent types and Generalized type constraints.

Case 1

sealed trait Inner

sealed trait Outer {
  sealed trait I extends Inner
}

final case object OuterA extends Outer {
  final case object Inner1 extends I
  final case object Inner2 extends I
}

final case object OuterB extends Outer {
  final case object Inner1 extends I
}

final class Data[O <: Outer, I <: O#I] private (outer: O, inner: I)

object Data {
  final def apply[O <: Outer, I <: O#I](outer: O, inner: I)(implicit ev: I <:< outer.I): Data[O, I] =
    new Data(outer, inner)
}

val data = Data(OuterA, OuterB.Inner1) // Does not compile.
val data = Data(OuterA, OuterA.Inner1) // Does compile.

Case 2

sealed trait Inner

sealed trait Outer {
  type I <: Inner
}

final case object OuterA extends Outer {
  override final type I = OuterAInner

  sealed trait OuterAInner extends Inner

  final case object Inner1 extends OuterAInner
  final case object Inner2 extends OuterAInner
}

final case object OuterB extends Outer {
  override final type I = OuterBInner

  sealed trait OuterBInner extends Inner

  final case object Inner1 extends OuterBInner
}

final class Data[O <: Outer, I <: O#I] private (outer: O, inner: I)

object Data {
  final def apply[O <: Outer, I <: O#I](outer: O, inner: I)(implicit ev: I <:< outer.I): Data[O, I] =
    new Data(outer, inner)
}

val data = new Data(OuterA, OuterA.Inner1) // Does compile.
val data = new Data(OuterA, OuterB.Inner1) // Does not compile.

Now, since the examples does not show how do you want to use the Data class and the outer & inner fields, this may not be enough, but hope it helps you.
If you have any doubts, do not hesitate on asking on the comments.

  • Actually it works without the generalized type constraints (implicit ev: I <:< outer.I) in both case (tested in Scastie with scala 2.11, 2.12 and 2.13). The second generic type parameter I <: O#I is sufficient. It looks like O#I in the context of a generic type parameter bound behaves differently from when used as a parameter type, do you have any hint on this? – M. Karassev Aug 2 at 15:22
  • @M.Karassev Uhm, sorry but no. You can also use two argument list too, like final def apply[O <: Outer](outer: O)(inner: outer.I). – Luis Miguel Mejía Suárez Aug 2 at 15:25
  • This compiles as stated in the comments or am I missing something? scastie.scala-lang.org/veLlWOvgTSOTd6wLaPty8w – M. Karassev Aug 2 at 16:02
  • @M.Karassev In this case, it seems you do not even need the companion object of Data: scastie.scala-lang.org/BalmungSan/Iw0K2xrdQoWjcKVNwy9i8Q/2 - But as I said, the trick is in how do you want to use all this things. – Luis Miguel Mejía Suárez Aug 2 at 16:26

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