3

To elaborate on a discussion in the comments below my last question: I am looking for suggestions on techniques or best practices for structuring SWI-Prolog code in order to be able to use and test alternative, interchangeable implementations of algorithms and their supporting modules.

The current situation can be illustrated using the following small, ficticous example: The user provides some input data (file data.pl) and loads a module with an algorithm to be applied (file graph.pl). The algorithm module itself uses helper predicates from another module (file path.pl) which in turn requires access to the user-provided data:

File 'data.pl' (input data set):

:- use_module(graph).

edge(a,b).
edge(b,c).
edge(c,d).

File 'graph.pl' (algorithm):

:- module(graph, [reachable/2]).
:- use_module(path).

reachable(X,Y) :-
    path(X,Y), !.
reachable(X,Y) :-
    path(Y,X), !.

File 'path.pl' (module with helper predicates, notice it accessing the data in user):

:- module(path, [path/2]).

path(X,X).
path(X,Y) :-
    user:edge(X,Z),
    path(Z,Y).

For the use case of applying the algorithm to a single input data set and the single implementation of the algorithm, this is perfectly fine:

?- [data].
true.

?- reachable(a,a).
true.

?- reachable(a,d).
true.

?- reachable(d,a).
true.

Now suppose that I have a larger number of data sets, and multiple alternative implementations of the graph and path modules (with the same interface, i.e., exported predicates). For the sake of the (small) example, let us assume we files data files data1.pl, data2.pl, helper predicate modules path1.pl, path2.pl, and algorithm modules graph1, graph2.pl.

I want to automate testing these using SWI-Prolog unit tests, and preferably be able to write a test suite that supports both the differing data sets and the different module implementations, without the need to restart Prolog in between. That is to say I want to be able test all combinations in the Cartesian product

{data1.pl, data2.pl} x {path1.pl, path2.pl} x {graph1.pl, graph2.pl}

without copy-pasting/duplicating code.

My question is: How would I go about this in SWI-Prolog? Are there best practices, design patterns or the like on how to structure code into modules for this purpose? Should I perhaps make use of dynamic importing for switching between alternative algorithm modules, and simply use setup and cleanup in unit tests for the data?

  • I am not sure about using the user module like this. Altogether, why are you not using use_module instead of "consulting" with [ ]? I think the manual should explain the differences. – User9213 Aug 4 at 6:42
  • Yes, the explicit reference to user is definitely not ideal. I guess the reasoning behind this was that the user would define their data in user space, may import different modules with algorithms all of which can then work on this data. – Jens Classen Aug 5 at 21:35
1

In order to apply the same set of tests to different implementations of the same predicates, or, more generically, to different implementations of the same interface/protocol, the tests must take the implementation as a dynamic parameter. Ideally, we should also be able to test the different algorithm implementations with different datasets.

A separate concern is how to organize the data and the algorithms that we want to run on the data. There are two sensible approaches. The first option is to view the data as importing or inheriting the algorithm implementations. In this case, the queries (e.g. reachable/2) would be sent to the data. A downside of this solution is that we may need to update the datasets everytime we want to apply a different set of algorithms (e.g. by importing a different module).

The second option is to view the data as a parameter of the algorithms. An easy implementation of this solution would be to add an extra argument to the predicates (e.g. the path and reachable predicates) that would be used to pass a reference to the data (e.g. user in the simple case mentioned in the question). A downside of this solution is that all algorithm related predicates would need the extra parameter (e.g. reachable/2 only calls path/2 and is only this predicate that actually calls edge/2).

All the above questions and corresponding alternative solutions can be easily and cleanly expressed using Logtalk parametric objects instead of Prolog modules and using Logtalk unit test framework, lgtunit, which supports parameterized tests out-of-the-box. Follows an example solution (which is portable and can be used with most Prolog systems).

First, let's make data only about the data. We start by defining a protocol/interface for all data objects:

:- protocol(graph_protocol).

    :- public(edge/2).
    ...

:- end_protocol.

All data objects would implement this protocol. For example:

:- object(graph1,
    implements(graph_protocol)).

    edge(a,b).
    edge(b,c).
    edge(c,d).

:- end_object.

Next, let's define parametric objects holding the algorithms with the single parameter being to pass the dataset object. These objects would likely also implement defined protocols specifying the predicates for which we want to provide alternative implementations. These protocols are omitted here for brevity.

:- object(path(_Data_)).

    :- uses(_Data_, [edge/2]).

    :- public(path/2).
    path(X,X).
    path(X,Y) :-
        edge(X,Z),
        path(Z,Y).

:- end_object.


:- object(reachable(_Data_)).

    :- uses(path(_Data_), [path/2]).

    :- public(reachable/2).
    reachable(X,Y) :-
        path(X,Y), !.
    reachable(X,Y) :-
        path(Y,X), !.

:- end_object.

Note that these objects use your predicate definitions as-is (the uses/2 directive in the reachable/1 object requires Logtalk 3.28.0 or later version).

The default case where the dataset is loaded into user can be simplified by defining:

:- object(reachable ,
    extends(reachable(user))).

:- end_object.

A typical query would be:

?- reachable(graph1)::reachable(a,d).
...

So far, we're only parameterizing the datasets, not the algorithms. We will get there. The tests could be defined also as a parametric object. For example:

:- object(tests(_Data_),
    extends(lgtunit)).

    :- uses(reachable(_Data_), [reachable/2]).

    test(r1) :-
        reachable(a,a).

    test(r2) :-
        reachable(a,d).

    test(r3) :-
        reachable(d,a).

:- end_object.

Testing over multiple datasets would use a goal such as:

lgtunit::run_test_sets([
    tests(graph1),
    tests(graph2),
    tests(graph3)
])

The original question focused on test alternative, interchangeable implementations of algorithms. But the solution is the same. We just need to modify the parametric tests object to take instead the object implementing the algorithm being tested as a parameter:

:- object(tests(_Algorithm_),
    extends(lgtunit)).

    :- uses(_Algorithm_, [reachable/2]).

    cover(reachable(_)).
    cover(path(_)).

    test(r1) :-
        reachable(a,a).

    test(r2) :-
        reachable(a,d).

    test(r3) :-
        reachable(d,a).

:- end_object.

And then, on the query that runs the tests, use whatever combination we want of datasets and algorithms. For example:

lgtunit::run_test_sets([
    tests(reachable1(graph1)), tests(reachable2(graph1)), 
    tests(reachable1(graph2)), tests(reachable2(graph2)),
    ...
])

The list argument of the lgtunit::run_test_sets/1 predicate can also be dynamically created. For example, assuming that all alternative implementations of the reachable/2 predicate implement a reachable_protocol protocol, the test goal could be:

datasets(Datasets),
findall(
    tests(Algorithm),
    (   implements_protocol(Algorithm, reachable_protocol),
        member(Dataset, Datasets),
        arg(1, Algorithm, Dataset)
    ),
    TestObjects
),
lgtunit::run_test_sets(TestObjects)

One noteworthy aspect of running these tests using lgtunit is that, besides, reporting the passed and failed tests, it's also trivial to report full predicate code coverage at the predicate clause level. This means that we not only test the algorithms but also check that all clauses used to implement the algorithms are being used. For this example, using only the graph1 dataset, the test output at the top-level interpreter is:

?- {tester}.
% 
% tests started at 2019/8/5, 7:17:46
% 
% running tests from object tests(graph1)
% file: /Users/pmoura/Desktop/plu/tests.lgt
% 
% g1: success
% g2: success
% g3: success
% 
% 3 tests: 0 skipped, 3 passed, 0 failed
% completed tests from object tests(graph1)
% 
% 
% clause coverage ratio and covered clauses per entity predicate
% 
% path(A): path/2 - 2/2 - (all)
% path(A): 2 out of 2 clauses covered, 100.000000% coverage
% 
% reachable(A): reachable/2 - 2/2 - (all)
% reachable(A): 2 out of 2 clauses covered, 100.000000% coverage
% 
% 2 entities declared as covered containing 4 clauses
% 2 out of 2 entities covered, 100.000000% entity coverage
% 4 out of 4 clauses covered, 100.000000% clause coverage
% 
% tests ended at 2019/8/5, 7:17:46
% 
true.

If you're automating tests (e.g. using a CI server), you can use instead the logtalk_tester script.

What if we want to keep using modules for datasets and/or the algorithms? For the tests object, it's just a question of writing instead:

:- object(tests(_Algorithm_),
    extends(lgtunit)).

    :- use_module(_Algorithm_, [reachable/2]).
    ...

:- end_object.

Logtalk's lgtunit supports testing plain Prolog code and Prolog modules code, besides Logtalk code (indeed, the Logtalk distribution includes a Prolog standards conformance test suite). For a tool overview, see e.g.

https://logtalk.org/tools.html#testing

At the above URL, we'll also find a code coverage report example. For full code example of using the solution sketched above see e.g.

https://github.com/LogtalkDotOrg/logtalk3/tree/master/library/dictionaries

This library provides three alternative implementations of a dictionary API and a single set of tests (using a parametric object) to test all of them.

Last, but not the least, you can use this testing solution with not only SWI-Prolog but also +10 other Prolog systems.

  • Thanks for this very elaborate answer. It seems Logtalk does everything I need, and when one knows a bit or two about object orientation, the learning curve shouldn't be too steep. I'm a little worried though that this nonetheless would constitute some significant overhead in effort, and that it introduces yet another dependency into the code, but that may be price worth paying to keep things manageable in the future. – Jens Classen Aug 5 at 21:32
  • You welcome. There are several learning resources in and linked from the Logtalk website, including a short tutorial. While Logtalk adds another dependency, it may also give your application (depending on its details) a degree of portability that would allow you to try it with multiple Prolog systems (there are a few, besides SWI-Prolog, that are also quite good). – Paulo Moura Aug 5 at 21:58
1

First, you have meta-predicates. Those should allow you to pass as arguments both the data and the building blocks of your algorithms. Take a look at this example. I wouldn't try anything more complicated until absolutely certain that this approach is not good enough.

Then, have you looked carefully at dynamic modules and the export/import interface?

Finally, you can always fall back to manually managing the database with assert, retract, abolish and so on. If you do that you could avoid the module system altogether.

But try doing it with meta-predicates first. Those are the obvious mechanism for "generic algorithms" in Prolog.


Some code. First, what can you do with unit test boxes? Well, you can do the following. Here are three modules:

$ cat foo.pl
:- module(foo, [x/1]).

x(foo).
$ cat bar.pl
:- module(bar, [x/1]).

x(bar).
$ cat baz.pl
:- module(baz, []).

:- begin_tests(foo).
:- use_module(foo).

test(x) :- x(foo).

:- end_tests(foo).

:- begin_tests(bar).
:- use_module(bar).

test(x) :- x(bar).

:- end_tests(bar).

The last module, baz, doesn't yet export anything, but it does have two separate unit test boxes. Loading the module and running the tests:

$ swipl
Welcome to SWI-Prolog (threaded, 64 bits, version 8.1.10-59-g09a7d554d-DIRTY)
SWI-Prolog comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY. This is free software.
Please run ?- license. for legal details.

For online help and background, visit http://www.swi-prolog.org
For built-in help, use ?- help(Topic). or ?- apropos(Word).

?- use_module(baz).
true.

?- run_tests.
% PL-Unit: foo . done
% PL-Unit: bar . done
% All 2 tests passed
true.

So apparently unit text boxes do let you have scopes.

To clarify, the point is that you can have client code without meta-calls (so no additional arguments) that assumes an interface (in the example, the call to x/1). Then, you can test different implementations of the same interface by importing the two competing modules in two separate unit test boxes within the same file.

All of that seems to be doable with Logtalk in a cleaner way anyway.

  • Thanks for the pointers. I guess dynamic modules are more suitable where one wants to generate modules "on the fly", but in this case, we want to simply be able to take user data files, each of which represents a known problem instance along with the expected solution/output, and check whether our algorithms' implementation(s) indeed yield the desired result. For this reason, assert/retract/abolish should be avoided as well in my opinion. – Jens Classen Aug 5 at 22:02
  • At the moment, I also don't see how exactly dynamic modules would help (to be honest I have a bit of a hard time understanding the documentation, and it seems I am not the only one). – Jens Classen Aug 5 at 22:03
  • @JensClassen And yet: did you understand the meta-predicate approach? This is also what the answer by PauloMoura seems to suggest before going into another direction. I did not take the time to show how exactly to code it; I could do (add a bit of code to the answer) it if you think you did not quite understand it. – User9213 Aug 6 at 4:29
  • @User9213 A meta-predicate would indeed allow to pass at runtime the data or algorithm locations (and also their functors). But this approach is cumbersome when you want to pass both locations. A unit test can easily call call/N with a closure for the algorithm location but then another closure argument is required to also pass the data location to a modified reachable predicate that would in turn pass it to a modified path predicate that's the one that actually calls the data predicates. This solution doesn't scale. But do expand your answer with code so that we can compare. – Paulo Moura Aug 6 at 11:37
  • @User9213 I noticed two of your comments vanishing but assumed you deleted them after updating your answer. No idea of what's happening. Sorry to see you go and thanks for your contributions. – Paulo Moura Aug 7 at 9:21
0

For Unit Tests, absolutely use setup/1 and cleanup/1, you want your test cases with your tests.

For your own exploration and for flexibility, re-jig your dependency tree, you don't want to be calling predicates with the user namespace as it won't work when your imports get more complex or shifted around. The algorithm relies on the utility predicates, which then requires the data that it operates on.

File 'data.pl' (input data set):

:- module(data, [edge/2]).

edge(a,b).
edge(b,c).
edge(c,d).

File 'graph.pl' (algorithm):

:- module(graph, [reachable/2]).
:- use_module(path).

reachable(X,Y) :-
    path(X,Y), !.
reachable(X,Y) :-
    path(Y,X), !.

File 'path.pl' (module with helper predicates, notice it accessing the data in the used module):

:- module(path, [path/2]).
:- use_module(data).

path(X,X).
path(X,Y) :-
    edge(X,Z),
    path(Z,Y).

Now you can swipl -g "reachable(a, d)" -s graph.pl. This'll let you easily change the data module used in path.pl. If you wished, you could dynamically load the module here with a predicate, but better to make use of setup/cleanup in unit tests:

:- dynamic path:edge/2.

/* Testing Graph
a→b→c→d 
*/
setup :-
    asserta(path:edge(a,b)),
    asserta(path:edge(b,c)),
    asserta(path:edge(c,d)).
cleanup :-
    retractall(path:edge(_, _)).

test(reach_same,
    [ true(A, a)
    , setup(setup)
    , cleanup(cleanup)
    , nondet
    ]
 ) :-
     reachable(a, A).
  • The dynamic(path:edge/2) directive is a terrible hack. It would be bad enough if edge/2 was a predicate exported by the path module. But it's worse: edge/2 is a predicate used implicitly by the path module from another module. To be clear, changing the directive to dynamic(data:edge/2) is still a terrible hack as you would still be changing the property of an exported predicate from outside the module that exports it. – Paulo Moura Aug 4 at 6:18
  • Yes, but just for the unit tests, so module path can be tested distinctly from it's dependencies. – Paul Brown Aug 4 at 8:40
  • Thanks for the suggestion. Indeed we should make use of the setup and cleanup procedures, and the explicit reference to user should be avoided. However, I have to agree with Paulo that asserting the user data as a dynamic predicate does not seem like a good idea, for at least two reasons: It will in reality be more data than just 3 facts (think more like 100), and also it appears to be a case of (undesirable) duplicate code when we have to assert the same facts again that are already defined in the user data module. – Jens Classen Aug 5 at 20:52
  • Then wrap the data source into a predicate in path: mount_data(Source) :- use_module(Source). Then in module graph or in unit tests: :- mount_data(data). – Paul Brown Aug 5 at 20:55
  • Interesting suggestion (although most systems don't allow using directives as predicates). But you can only use it once: as soon as you load a data source in a given context, you will not be able to load another data source in the same context without restarting (you will get a permission error stating that the predicates are already imported from another module). Thus, testing alternative algorithm implementations and/or alternative datasets seems to imply restarting for each combo (not necessarily a bad thing but not required in the presented Logtalk-based solution). – Paulo Moura Aug 6 at 6:47

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