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What's the best practice to use Dockerfile with docker-compose.yml? And how to do CI/CD with Jenkins?

I have 2 microservices and one Postgres database. I create docker-compose.yml file:

version: '3.1'
services:
  myflashcards-service-dictionary:
    image: myflashcards-service-dictionary
  db:
    image: postgres
    restart: always
    ports:
      - 5434:5432

The question is what to write in "image:" section? Should I first run mvn clean install -DskipTests dockerfile:build? But what with the image name?

I'd like to know how to automate the whole CI/CD.

I have Dockerfile:

FROM openjdk:8-jdk-alpine

ADD target/myflashcards-service-dictionary.jar myflashcards-service-dictionary.jar

ENTRYPOINT exec java -Djava.security.egd=file:/dev/./urandom -Dspring.profiles.active=$profile -jar /myflashcards-service-dictionary.jar

EXPOSE 8092

I have also docker-compose.yml but how docker-compose.yml know which image should be used?

Would you briefly outline the main process how to deploy my microservices app to the server?

How to use Dockerfile and docker-compose? When are these files necessary? Do we need Dockerfile only to create an image in Docker Hub?

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  • In general, in your docker-compose.yml you can use a public image from Docker Hub if you are happy to use an existing image as-is, and you can use a build context if you need to build your own image.
    – halfer
    Aug 4, 2019 at 4:41

2 Answers 2

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Your Dockerfile is similar to the Maven POM file; its a set of instructions for Docker to create an image with (docker build image-name .). Dockerfile is a must, you cannot use Docker without a one. It's like trying to use a Maven without a POM file.

Name of the image is what you give for the Maven plugin (<repository>spotify/foobar</repository>) or docker build <image-name> . and this can be anything you like.

Docker Compose is a tool that can be used to manage a service, that can be comprised of multiple micro-services. It allows users to create an orchestration plan that can be run later. This allows users to script complex information of the Docker environment like volumes, networking, restart policies and many more.

Docker Compose file is an optional one and can be replaced with a different alternative like HashiCorp Nomad But Docker Compose is one of the easiest to use, stick to this if you're new to Docker.

Docker Compose is able to build and use an image at runtime (useful for development) or run an image that already exists in a repository (production recommendation). Full Docker Compose documentation should explain how to write a one.

Build at runtime

version: '3.1'
services:
  myflashcards-service-dictionary:
    build: path/to/folder/of/Dockerfile
  db:
    image: postgres
    restart: always
    ports:
      - 5434:5432

Run a pre-existing image

version: '3.1'
services:
  myflashcards-service-dictionary:
    image: myflashcards-service-dictionary
  db:
    image: postgres
    restart: always
    ports:
      - 5434:5432

Dockerfile can be used without a Docker Compose, the only difference is that it's not practical to use in production since it considered as a single service deployment. As far as I'm aware, it cannot be used with Docker Swarm

As far as CI/CD goes, you can use a Maven plugin like Dockerfile Maven Plugin. You can find the docs here. This image then can be pushed to a repository like Docker Hub, AWS ECR or even a self-hosted one (I wouldn't recommend this unless you're comfortable with setting up highly secure networks especially if it's not an internal network).

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Dockerfile is a spec to build a container image and is used by Docker:

docker build --tag=${REPO}/${IMAGE}:${TAG} --file=./Dockerfile .

The default ${REPO} is docker.io aka DockerHub and is assumed if null|omitted.

You only need Dockerfile for images that you wish to build. For existing images, these are docker pull ... from container image registries (e.g. DockerHUb, Google Container Registry, Quay). Pulls are often performed implicitly by e.g. docker-compose up.

Once built, you may reference this image from a docker-compose.yaml file.

Docker Compose looks in your local image cache (docker image ls) for images. If it doesn't find it, (with your file), it will try to pull myflashcards-service-dictionary:latest and postgres:latest from the default repo (aka dockerhub).

It's possible to include a build spec in docker-compose.yaml too in which case, if not found locally, Docker Compose will try to docker build ... the images for you.

Docker Compose is one tool that permits multiple containers to be configured, run, networked etc. Another, increasingly popular tool for orchestrating containers is Kubernetes.

There's lots of good documentation online for Docker, Docker-Compose and developing CI/CD pipelines.

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