51

I am doing some parallel processing, as follows:

with mp.Pool(8) as tmpPool:
        results = tmpPool.starmap(my_function, inputs)

where inputs look like: [(1,0.2312),(5,0.52) ...] i.e., tuples of an int and a float.

The code runs nicely, yet I cannot seem to wrap it around a loading bar (tqdm), such as can be done with e.g., imap method as follows:

tqdm.tqdm(mp.imap(some_function,some_inputs))

Can this be done for starmap also?

Thanks!

4
  • 1
    If possible, I would say change your my_function to receive one packed argument and unpack it inside the function and then use imap
    – Tomerikoo
    Aug 5, 2019 at 8:26
  • Yes, that is the default solution currently. I am still wondering whether starmap supports this (or any variant of it) Aug 5, 2019 at 8:47
  • Not that I'm aware of or can see in the docs. The only variant I know of is starmap_async which is simply non-blocking but still returns a result object. I believe you will have to adjust your function to work with imap as it is the only option that works as a generator and not returning all results at once. Will be happy to see if there is a better solution
    – Tomerikoo
    Aug 5, 2019 at 9:39
  • 1
    Thanks, Currently, I've re-implemented it with imap. Would be nice to have the istarmap also! Aug 5, 2019 at 11:21

4 Answers 4

55

The simplest way would probably be to apply tqdm() around the inputs, rather than the mapping function. For example:

inputs = zip(param1, param2, param3)
with mp.Pool(8) as pool:
    results = pool.starmap(my_function, tqdm.tqdm(inputs, total=len(param1)))

Note that the bar is updated when my_function is called, rather than when it returns. If that distinction matters, you can consider rewriting starmap as some other answers suggest. Otherwise, this is a simple and efficient alternative.

12
  • 5
    Thanks a lot. This should be the accepted answer, I think. I had to pass the input length as total to tqdm to make it work.
    – SaTa
    Feb 5, 2021 at 20:06
  • 2
    Did you use chunksize != 1? It's possible elements were being pulled from the input in chunks so the progress bar updated irregularly
    – corey
    Feb 5, 2021 at 22:00
  • 15
    This seems to only track when the inputs are being sent, but not when the processing of my_function is completed.
    – gofvonx
    Nov 4, 2021 at 16:57
  • 3
    I'm not sure if you're aware but gofvonx is right. This measures input- not output-progression. That's also why this appears to be faster as some people commented. Now imagine all but the last task taking up five seconds but the last one hour to complete. You could end up with getting displayed 100% progress for almost an hour before the actual finish...
    – Darkonaut
    Feb 17, 2022 at 0:28
  • 3
    Progresbar progresses very quickly and get to the %100, and then it still continues to run until it is done. Apr 15, 2022 at 9:39
51

It's not possible with starmap(), but it's possible with a patch adding Pool.istarmap(). It's based on the code for imap(). All you have to do, is create the istarmap.py-file and import the module to apply the patch before you make your regular multiprocessing-imports.

Python <3.8

# istarmap.py for Python <3.8
import multiprocessing.pool as mpp


def istarmap(self, func, iterable, chunksize=1):
    """starmap-version of imap
    """
    if self._state != mpp.RUN:
        raise ValueError("Pool not running")

    if chunksize < 1:
        raise ValueError(
            "Chunksize must be 1+, not {0:n}".format(
                chunksize))

    task_batches = mpp.Pool._get_tasks(func, iterable, chunksize)
    result = mpp.IMapIterator(self._cache)
    self._taskqueue.put(
        (
            self._guarded_task_generation(result._job,
                                          mpp.starmapstar,
                                          task_batches),
            result._set_length
        ))
    return (item for chunk in result for item in chunk)


mpp.Pool.istarmap = istarmap

Python 3.8+

# istarmap.py for Python 3.8+
import multiprocessing.pool as mpp


def istarmap(self, func, iterable, chunksize=1):
    """starmap-version of imap
    """
    self._check_running()
    if chunksize < 1:
        raise ValueError(
            "Chunksize must be 1+, not {0:n}".format(
                chunksize))

    task_batches = mpp.Pool._get_tasks(func, iterable, chunksize)
    result = mpp.IMapIterator(self)
    self._taskqueue.put(
        (
            self._guarded_task_generation(result._job,
                                          mpp.starmapstar,
                                          task_batches),
            result._set_length
        ))
    return (item for chunk in result for item in chunk)


mpp.Pool.istarmap = istarmap

Then in your script:

import istarmap  # import to apply patch
from multiprocessing import Pool
import tqdm    


def foo(a, b):
    for _ in range(int(50e6)):
        pass
    return a, b    


if __name__ == '__main__':

    with Pool(4) as pool:
        iterable = [(i, 'x') for i in range(10)]
        for _ in tqdm.tqdm(pool.istarmap(foo, iterable),
                           total=len(iterable)):
            pass
9
  • 1
    Very nice, this is exactly what I was after! Thanks! Aug 6, 2019 at 4:48
  • I get AttributeError: '_PoolCache' object has no attribute '_cache' - any ideas? It occurs at the line result = mp.IMapIterator(self._cache)
    – wfgeo
    Jul 9, 2020 at 8:06
  • 1
    @wfgeo I'm using mpp as name for the module, your example uses mp. Do you get the error with exactly my example from the answer, too?
    – Darkonaut
    Jul 9, 2020 at 8:40
  • Yes I just replaced mpp and mp, it's just a personal convention, sorry. I do get the error with the same code, but it was because I had not called the module istarmap. I am currently having trouble bundling it into my own module, however, I can't seem to figure out the import statement if I put istarmap as a submodule in my own module
    – wfgeo
    Jul 9, 2020 at 8:46
  • 1
    @JulienDrevon It's already iterating over the results. In the example the results is assigned to _, within for _ in tqdm.tqdm(..., because the result doesn't get used, but that's just convention for this case. You could write for result in tqdm.tqdm(... and then print(result) on every iteration or whatever you want to do with it.
    – Darkonaut
    Nov 11, 2022 at 18:36
20

As Darkonaut mentioned, as of this writing there's no istarmap natively available. If you want to avoid patching, you can add a simple *_star function as a workaround. (This solution inspired by this tutorial.)

import tqdm
import multiprocessing

def my_function(arg1, arg2, arg3):
  return arg1 + arg2 + arg3

def my_function_star(args):
    return my_function(*args)

jobs = 4
with multiprocessing.Pool(jobs) as pool:
    args = [(i, i, i) for i in range(10000)]
    results = list(tqdm.tqdm(pool.imap(my_function_star, args), total=len(args))

Some notes:

I also really like corey's answer. It's cleaner, though the progress bar does not appear to update as smoothly as my answer. Note that corey's answer is several orders of magnitude faster with the code I posted above with chunksize=1 (default). I'm guessing this is due to multiprocessing serialization, because increasing chunksize (or having a more expensive my_function) makes their runtime comparable.

I went with my answer for my application since my serialization/function cost ratio was very low.

3
  • This is the best answer! Your notes about corey's answer is on point!
    – ethanjyx
    Oct 19, 2021 at 21:43
  • This is great, thanks! I think as an extension to this, you can write a general function f_star(f, args) that returns f(*args). Then you can write this as a utility function and use it anywhere you want to use tqdm with starmap. Sep 10, 2022 at 19:10
  • Sorry, I made a mistake in my suggestion, it should say f_star(f_args) takes a tuple of (f, args) and returns f(*args). Sep 10, 2022 at 19:57
-4

The temporary solution: rewriting the method to-be-parallelized with imap.

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