9

Given a number of IDs, each possibly connected to other entries in the same table, I'd like to find their top level parents. I.e. those rows for which the parent ID is NULL. So below each red unit would be connected up the hierarchy to a corresponding green one.

Hierarchy

Borrowing from this answer in a very similar question, here's a toy schema.

DECLARE @t TABLE (ID INT, link INT)

INSERT INTO @t VALUES
(1, NULL),
(2, 1),
(3, 2),
(4, 3),
(5, 3),
(6, 2),
(7, 1),

(8, NULL),
(9, 8),
(10, 9),
(11, 9),
(12, 9),
(13, 12),
(14, 12),
(15, 8);

I would have a set of IDs, 6 and 13 for an example with two bottom-level nodes. Then I'd want a result set like (6, 1) and (13, 8). To construct every link all the way up, the answer suggested a common table expression.

WITH cte AS (
    SELECT ID, link
    FROM @t
    WHERE ID IN (6, 13)

    UNION ALL

    SELECT t.ID, t.link
    FROM @t t
    JOIN cte c ON t.ID = c.link
    WHERE t.link IS NOT NULL
)

SELECT *
FROM cte

Which yields this result:

 ID | link
----+------
  6 |   2
 13 |  12
 12 |   9
  9 |   8
  2 |   1

However, I'm not sure how could I combine this into one result for each starting point. For one ID, I could perhaps choose the last row of the result set and get the link ID, but not for multiple. Mind you, there can naturally be multiple top-level parents (although branching occurs only down, so only one parent for a given node), and mid-level entries can be chosen as starting points as well.

Instead of a UNION ALL I naïvely tried to JOIN, but it turned out such CTEs are not allowed.

Here are all the nodes colored red above: (3, 6, 11, 13, 15). They should map to (1, 1, 8, 8, 8).

2
  • 1
    You should use hierarchyid instead of self-reference. Instead of an expensive recursion you get a fast search on an indexable column. Commented Aug 5, 2019 at 9:50
  • @PanagiotisKanavos Wow, that's nice! Thank you. Nevertheless, it would be interesting to know if a method exists outside this clearly optimal solution. For those already-established architectures, and just plain curiosity.
    – Felix
    Commented Aug 5, 2019 at 9:54

3 Answers 3

2

2 issues with the code:

  1. You need to track your starting ID through the recursion;
  2. The where condition in the recursive part is actually preventing you from getting the result.

As such:

WITH cte AS (
    SELECT ID, link, ID as [StartID]
    FROM @t
    WHERE ID IN (6, 7)
    UNION ALL
    SELECT t.ID, t.link, c.StartID
    FROM @t t
    JOIN cte c ON t.ID = c.link
)
SELECT c.StartID, c.ID
FROM cte c
where c.link is null;
0
1

Remember the starting point, track level, take max level.

DECLARE @t TABLE (ID INT, link INT)

INSERT INTO @t VALUES
(1, NULL),
(2, 1),
(3, 1),
(4, 2),
(5, 3),
(6, 4),
(7, 5);

WITH cte AS (
    SELECT ID, link, 1 as [level], id as [start]
    FROM @t
    WHERE ID IN (6, 7)

    UNION ALL

    SELECT t.ID, t.link, c.[level] + 1, c.[start]
    FROM @t t
    JOIN cte c ON t.ID = c.link
    WHERE t.link IS NOT NULL
)

SELECT TOP(1) WITH TIES [start], link
FROM cte
ORDER BY [level] DESC;
5
  • As OP has mentioned, the graphs can have multiple roots (i.e. they are not trees). Your approach will only return roots with longest paths.
    – Roger Wolf
    Commented Aug 5, 2019 at 10:38
  • @RogerWolf Good observation! Indeed, should row 6 have row 2 as its parent, it is not returned in the result set. Though not sure about the exact terminology, I believe they still are trees. There just are multiple trees.
    – Felix
    Commented Aug 5, 2019 at 10:42
  • @RogerWolf Multiple roots, but as depicted on OP images, the node may have only one root. This is a forest, not a network, i guess
    – Serg
    Commented Aug 5, 2019 at 10:43
  • @Serg,what if they are drawn upside down? :D
    – Roger Wolf
    Commented Aug 5, 2019 at 10:51
  • Oh, no, the pictures are explained. Disregard my previous comment.
    – Roger Wolf
    Commented Aug 5, 2019 at 10:53
1

You can tweak your query to get what you want:

WITH cte AS (
    SELECT ID as orig_id, ID, link, 1 as lev
    FROM @t
    WHERE ID IN (6, 7)

    UNION ALL

    SELECT c.orig_id, t.ID, t.link, lev + 1
    FROM @t t JOIN
         cte c
         ON t.ID = c.link
    WHERE t.link IS NOT NULL
)
SELECT orig_id, link
FROM (SELECT c.*, MAX(lev) OVER (PARTITION BY orig_id) as max_lev
      FROM cte c
     )  c
WHERE lev = max_lev;

The changes are:

  • Including the original id in the CTE.
  • Keeping track of the level ("height") of the relationship.
  • Choosing the highest level for each of the original ids.
6
  • Similar to Serg's answer in intent, but does produce the correct result for routes of different length! Thank you.
    – Felix
    Commented Aug 5, 2019 at 10:46
  • Same problem as with @Serg's answer, multiple roots are not displayed. Add (6, 10), (10, null) to the data set and you will see.
    – Roger Wolf
    Commented Aug 5, 2019 at 10:49
  • @RogerWolf I recreated the example picture in the schema to test every node, and they do map to the correct parents using this method.
    – Felix
    Commented Aug 5, 2019 at 11:05
  • @Felix, your pictures have single roots, however you mentioned in your question that "there can naturally be multiple top-level parents". This little circumstance changes everything.
    – Roger Wolf
    Commented Aug 5, 2019 at 11:09
  • @RogerWolf There are, two in the picture even. Poorly worded, yes, now I see it, but the whole linking thing wouldn't work if there were multiple links, would it? One value per entry does not allow branching in the other direction.
    – Felix
    Commented Aug 5, 2019 at 11:11

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