17

In C#, if you have two base interfaces with the same method (say, F()) you can use explicit implementation to perform different impl. for F(). This alloes you to differently treat the object, corresponding to the current point of view: as IMyInterface1 or IMyInterface2. Is this possible in Java?

28

No, there's nothing like C#'s explicit interface implementation in Java.

On the plus side, Java has covariant return types, so if you want to provide a more strongly typed implementation than the interface specifies, that's okay. For instance, this is fine:

interface Foo
{
    Object getBar();
}

public class Test implements Foo
{
    @Override
    public String getBar()
    {
        return "hi";
    }
}

C# wouldn't allow that - and one of the ways around it is typically to implement the interface explicitly and then have a more specific public method (usually called by the interface implementation).

4

You can achieve similar effect using the mechanism of anonymous interface implementation in Java.

See example:

interface Foo {

    void f();
}

interface Bar {

    void f();
}

public class Test {

    private String foo = "foo", bar = "bar";

    Foo getFoo() {
        return new Foo() {

            @Override
            public void f() {
                System.out.println(foo);
            }
        };
    }

    Bar getBar() {
        return new Bar() {

            @Override
            public void f() {
                System.out.println(bar);
            }
        };
    }

    public static void main(String... args) {
        Test test = new Test();
        test.getFoo().f();
        test.getBar().f();
    }
}
0

You can only do this if the methods are overloaded. If you have two method which are expected to do different things, they should have different names IMHO.

-17

No and it should never be present in Java. It's just another bone to throw at people who can't be bothered with good design.

Explicit implementation of an interface should never be needed or used. There are better ways to solver the problem that this tries to solve.

  • Do you also believe that private inheritance is only for "people who can't be bothered with good design"? That's another useful OOP capability missing from Java. – Ben Voigt May 21 '10 at 4:41
  • It will never be in Java for the same reason that delegates will never be in Java.. google it. There is a good article about why delegates where never done in Java and this is similar. It's bad because of what it allows you to do not the good stuff you can do with it. Something Microsoft and it's ecosystem don't get. – eaglestorm May 24 '10 at 0:20
  • 1
    @ealgestorm, you do realize that even Swing "abuses" objects to make them behave like delegates, right? Also, I do find it a bit amusing that almost all of your questions are related to .NET. – Teo Klestrup Röijezon Jul 12 '11 at 17:04
  • 7
    Eaglestorm, care to eat your words? openjdk.java.net/jeps/126 – Aaron Friel Nov 9 '11 at 17:00
  • 2
    As for explicit interfaces - in complex scenarios you might happen to conform to the APIs of two distinct systems, which happen to define interfaces with matching methods, and still must have different implementations. The burden of complications obviously comes to the consuming code. – Ivaylo Slavov Jan 9 '12 at 18:19

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