1

I'm using R along with library moments to generate a small dataset and compute the four initial moments of my data:

  1. Mean
  2. Variation
  3. Skewness
  4. Kurstosis

The code is shown below. I set a random seed for my PRNG and generates 1000 data points using a normal distribution.
Then, I print four moments two ways. First, I print then individually. Then, I print them using the method all.moments.

library(moments)

set.seed(123)
x = rnorm(1000, sd = 0.02)

print(mean(x));
print(var(x));
print(skewness(x))
print(kurtosis(x))

print(moments::all.moments(x, order.max = 4))

The outputs are shown below.

print(mean(x));
0.0003225573

print(var(x));
0.0003933836

print(skewness(x));  
0.06529391

print(kurtosis(x));  
2.925747

print(moments::all.moments(x, order.max = 4));  
1.000000e+00 3.225573e-04 3.930942e-04 8.889998e-07 4.527577e-07

One may note that both the skewness and the kurtosis of both methods are different.

My question is: Why they give different results? Which result is the right one?

  • 2
    Pretty sure skewness and kurtosis are typically defined as standardized moments, whereas all.moments is probably calculating the raw moment. – joran Aug 5 at 20:35
  • @Joran even if I use the central option or the absolute option on all.moments, the results are different. – Iago Carvalho Aug 5 at 20:52
  • 1
    Yes, that's different than normalizing. They are calculating different things. I double checked my memory just by skimming the wikipedia articles are moments and skewness/kurtosis, you could probably do the same. – joran Aug 5 at 20:55
  • Do you suggest an alternative package? – Iago Carvalho Aug 5 at 21:55
  • You should program the formulas directly. They aren't difficult, but there are multiple definitions, so do it yourself to match your preferred definition. – user2554330 Aug 5 at 21:57

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.