7

I have a long string that I'm iterating through, and at each iteration I compare a section of the string to a constant and store some parts of the string. In my actual code, this code runs millions of times and is the main bottleneck. I think it's due to the excessive use of std::string::substr.

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

int main() {
    std::string str("0=My,1=comma,2=separated,3=string,0=with,3=repeated,7=IDs");
    std::vector<std::string> out0;
    std::map<std::string, std::string> out;

    size_t pos = str.find(',');

    // loop over the string, collecting "key=value" pairs
    while (pos < str.size() - 1) {
        if (str.substr(pos + 1, 2) == "0=") {
            auto newPos = str.find(',', pos + 3);
            out0.push_back(str.substr(pos + 3, newPos - pos - 3);
            pos = newPos;
        } else {
            size_t eqPos = str.find('=', pos + 1);
            auto newPos = str.find(',', eqPos + 1);
            out[str.substr(pos + 1, eqPos - pos - 1)] = str.substr(eqPos + 1, newPos - eqPos - 1);
        }
    }

    // print out the data structures (this doesn't happen in my actual code)
    std::cout << "out0:";
    for (auto& entry : out0) {
        std::cout << ' ' << entry;
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;

    std::cout << "out:";
    for (auto it : out) {
        std::cout << ' ' << it->first << '=' << it->second;
    }
}

Here are my questions:

  • How can I perform comparisons on the string without performing a copy and without writing the comparison for each character, e.g. str[pos + 1] == '0' && str[pos + 2] == '=' && ...?
  • How can I store references to substrings, instead of making copies every time I add to out0 and out?

This may be a great case for the use of char *, but I've never used it before.

Edit:

Unfortunately, I've only got C++11; otherwise, std::string_view is the best answer. Is there a way to accomplish the storage of references without std::string_view?

3
  • Use std::char_traits<char>::compare to compare character sequences directly. See en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/string/char_traits/compare . There's an example in my answer. Commented Aug 6, 2019 at 18:37
  • I was also looking for the ability to store references to segments in the string without copying, which I accomplished by just storing a char* and a size_t. Thanks for the comprehensive answer!
    – Kyle
    Commented Aug 6, 2019 at 19:33
  • @Kyle You can use std::pair for that. Commented Aug 6, 2019 at 20:26

5 Answers 5

9

If you have C++17, you can use string_view thus: (untested code):

string_view sv{str.data() + pos, 2};
if (sv == "0=") ...

No copies. Or even (all in one go):

if (string_view{str.data() + pos, 2} == "0=") ...

If you don't have string_view, you can use char_traits:

if (std::char_traits<char>::compare(str.data() + pos, "0=", 2) == 0) ...
4

Since people have posted std::string_view, here is the plain old C pointers version.

(Didn't test though, but it'll give you the idea)

See below:

std::string str("0=My,1=comma,2=separated,3=string,0=with,3=repeated,7=IDs");
std::string substr("test");
.
. Inside some function
.
const char *str_p = str.c_str();        // String you want to compare with a substring
const char *substr_p = substr.c_str();  // Your substring
size_t str_len = str.length();
size_t substr_len = substr.length();
bool comparison_result = true;
for(size_t i = 0; i < str_len - substr_len; i++) {
    for(size_t j = 0; j < substr_len; j++) {
        if(*(str_p + i + j) != *(substr_p + j)) {
            comparison_result = false;
            break;
        }
        if (j == substr_len - 1) { // We can only reach here when substring is hit
            comparison_result = true;
            i = str_len - substr_len;
            break;
        }
    }
}
return comparison_result;

EDIT:

Due to @Toby Speight's suggestion in the comments (which I find very nice), I'm implementing a std::memcmp() version as well. In that case, the inner loop becomes:

.
. Inside some function
.
const char *str_p = str.c_str();        // String you want to compare with a substring
const char *substr_p = substr.c_str();  // Your substring
size_t str_len = str.length();
size_t substr_len = substr.length();
bool comparison_result = false;
for(size_t i = 0; i < str_len - substr_len; i++) {
    if(std::memcmp(str_p + i, substr_p, substr_len) == 0) {
        comparison_result = true;
        break;
    }
}
return comparison_result;

EDIT:

We got another request, this time from @Alexander Zhang, let's implement it:

.
. Inside some function
.
const char *str_p = str.c_str();        // String you want to compare with a substring
const char *substr_p = substr.c_str();  // Your substring
size_t str_len = str.length();
size_t substr_len = substr.length();
bool comparison_result = false;
for(size_t i = 0; i < str_len - substr_len; i++) {
    if(std::memcmp(&str_p[i], &substr_p[0], substr_len) == 0) {
        comparison_result = true;
        break;
    }
}
return comparison_result;
4
  • It's probably better to use std::memcmp() than to write your own inner loop there. Commented Aug 6, 2019 at 16:03
  • You can use subscript notation with pointers too. No need for the explicit pointer arithmetic.
    – eesiraed
    Commented Aug 6, 2019 at 18:55
  • No need for the comparison_result variable - we could simply return true as soon as we find a match, and false if the loop terminates. Commented Aug 7, 2019 at 8:04
  • The reason I added it was because of this: it is a simpler convention to use return var; only at the end of a function. Because, sometimes you can modify your function by adding a small check after your loop and then all of a sudden, your function does not execute your extension. But it's a bit of a personal preference, I guess.
    – Okan Barut
    Commented Aug 7, 2019 at 8:11
3

Use a std::string_view instead of std::string for the key and value of of out. std::string_view holds a pointer to the string, and a size of the string, so it is very light weight. This lets you extract the information you need, but without having to copy any of the characters in string and any potential memory allocations of creating those strings.

What you'll need to do is get a string_view from the std::string, and then use that string_view to get all of the sub strings you need.

3

std::string has compare() methods that take a const char* substring as input. You don't need to use std::string::substr() to compare substrings, eg:

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

int main() {
    std::string str("0=My,1=comma,2=separated,3=string,0=with,3=repeated,7=IDs");
    std::vector<std::string> out0;
    std::map<std::string, std::string> out;

    size_t startPos = 0, delimPos, nameStart, nameEnd, valueStart, valueEnd;

    // loop over the string, collecting "key=value" pairs
    while (startPos < str.size()){
        nameStart = startPos;
        delimPos = str.find_first_of("=,", startPos, 2);
        if (delimPos == std::string::npos) {
            nameEnd = valueStart = valueEnd = str.size();
        }
        else {
            nameEnd = delimPos;
            if (str[delimPos] == '=') {
                valueStart = nameEnd + 1;
                valueEnd = str.find(',', valueStart);
                if (valueEnd == std::string::npos) {
                    valueEnd = str.size();
                }
            }
            else {
                valueStart = valueEnd = nameEnd;
            }
        }

        // TODO: if needed, adjust name(Start|End) and value(Start|End) to
        // ignore leading/trailing whitespace around the name and value
        // substrings...

        if (str.compare(nameStart, nameEnd - nameStart, "0", 1) == 0) {
            out0.push_back(str.substr(valueStart, valueEnd - valueStart));
        } else {
            out[str.substr(nameStart, nameEnd - nameStart)] = str.substr(valueStart, valueEnd - valueStart);
        }

        startPos = valueEnd + 1;
    }

    // print out the data structures
    std::cout << "out0:";
    for (auto& entry : out0) {
        std::cout << ' ' << entry;
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;

    std::cout << "out:";
    for (auto it : out) {
        std::cout << ' ' << it->first << '=' << it->second;
    }
}

Output:

out0: My with
out: 1=comma 2=separated 3=repeated 7=IDs

Live Demo

You could take this a step further to eliminate the use of substr() altogether by not storing std::string values in your std::vector and std::map at all, but rather store std::pair<char*, size_t>:

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <utility>

using StrView = std::pair<const char*, size_t>;

StrView makeStrView(const char *str, size_t size) {
    return std::make_pair(str, size);
}

struct compareStrView {
    bool operator()(const StrView &lhs, const StrView &rhs) const {
        if (lhs.second == rhs.second)
            return (std::char_traits<char>::compare(lhs.first, rhs.first, lhs.second) < 0);
        return (lhs.second < rhs.second);
    }
};

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream &os, const StrView &rhs) {
    return os.write(rhs.first, rhs.second);
}

int main() {
    std::string str("0=My,1=comma,2=separated,3=string,0=with,3=repeated,7=IDs");
    std::vector<StrView> out0;
    std::map<StrView, StrView, compareStrView> out;

    size_t startPos = 0, delimPos, nameStart, nameEnd, valueStart, valueEnd;

    // loop over the string, collecting "key=value" pairs
    while (startPos < str.size()){
        nameStart = startPos;
        delimPos = str.find_first_of("=,", startPos, 2);
        if (delimPos == std::string::npos) {
            nameEnd = valueStart = valueEnd = str.size();
        }
        else {
            nameEnd = delimPos;
            if (str[delimPos] == '=') {
                valueStart = nameEnd + 1;
                valueEnd = str.find(',', valueStart);
                if (valueEnd == std::string::npos) {
                    valueEnd = str.size();
                }
            }
            else {
                valueStart = valueEnd = nameEnd;
            }
        }

        // TODO: if needed, adjust nameStart/End and valueStartEnd to
        // ignore leading/trailing whitespace around the name and value
        // substrings...

        if (str.compare(nameStart, nameEnd - nameStart, "0", 1) == 0) {
            out0.push_back(makeStrView(&str[valueStart], valueEnd - valueStart));
        } else {
            out[makeStrView(&str[nameStart], nameEnd - nameStart)] = makeStrView(&str[valueStart], valueEnd - valueStart);
        }

        startPos = valueEnd + 1;
    }

    // print out the data structures
    std::cout << "out0:";
    for (auto& entry : out0) {
        std::cout << ' ' << entry;
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;

    std::cout << "out:";
    for (auto &it : out) {
        std::cout << ' ' << it.first << '=' << it.second;
    }
}

Output:

out0: My with
out: 1=comma 2=separated 3=repeated 7=IDs

Live Demo

In C++17, you can use std::string_view instead:

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <string_view>

int main() {
    std::string str("0=My,1=comma,2=separated,3=string,0=with,3=repeated,7=IDs");
    std::string_view sv(str);
    std::vector<std::string_view> out0;
    std::map<std::string_view, std::string_view> out;

    size_t startPos = 0, delimPos, nameStart, nameEnd, valueStart, valueEnd;

    // loop over the string, collecting "key=value" pairs
    while (startPos < sv.size()){
        nameStart = startPos;
        delimPos = sv.find_first_of("=,", startPos, 2);
        if (delimPos == std::string_view::npos) {
            nameEnd = valueStart = valueEnd = sv.size();
        }
        else {
            nameEnd = delimPos;
            if (sv[delimPos] == '=') {
                valueStart = nameEnd + 1;
                valueEnd = sv.find(',', valueStart);
                if (valueEnd == std::string_view::npos) {
                    valueEnd = sv.size();
                }
            }
            else {
                valueStart = valueEnd = nameEnd;
            }
        }

        // TODO: if needed, adjust nameStart/End and valueStartEnd to
        // ignore leading/trailing whitespace around the name and value
        // substrings...

        if (sv.compare(nameStart, nameEnd - nameStart, "0", 1) == 0) {
            out0.push_back(sv.substr(valueStart, valueEnd - valueStart));
        } else {
            out[sv.substr(nameStart, nameEnd - nameStart)] = sv.substr(valueStart, valueEnd - valueStart);
        }

        startPos = valueEnd + 1;
    }

    // print out the data structures
    std::cout << "out0:";
    for (auto& entry : out0) {
        std::cout << ' ' << entry;
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;

    std::cout << "out:";
    for (auto &it : out) {
        std::cout << ' ' << it.first << '=' << it.second;
    }
}
-1

You can try to use Regex to split the value pair tuples.

Although haven't tested if any faster

This expression should do the trick, just get all the match (all the pairs)

(?:(\d)+=(?:([^,]*),?))*?

https://regex101.com/r/PDZMq0/1

2
  • 1
    I think some users downvoted your answer because my question wasn't about splitting the line but about storing and searching the strings.
    – Kyle
    Commented Aug 6, 2019 at 20:53
  • If I understood correctly / was clear enough, you wanted to get the key / value pairs. After matching the string with that expression you can retrieve the groups
    – Lantaros
    Commented Aug 7, 2019 at 15:48

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