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I've written a C++ model which has inputs, outputs, and internal variables. In this case, the inputs are a sample stream x[n]. The outputs and internal variables are also sample streams. I'm calling this version of the code the "golden reference".

I've also thought of some code optimizations that I want to try. I'm calling this version of the code "experimental". But I want to make sure that any changes don't break the code. That is, the experimental code's inputs, outputs, and some internal variables match the golden reference's.

So for a sample stream input, I want to check that the experimental codes inputs, outputs, and internal variables match the golden references.

But I'm trying to think of a code/build structure that will allow me to run both versions at the same time with minimal changes to file names, class names, etc.

So far the easiest solution seems to me to edit each file in the experimental code base and rename the namespace and the #include paths. Is there a better solution that doesn't require a lot of renaming?

Most code resides in header files because of templates, etc.

// Golden src/top.h
#include "src/sub1.h"
#include "src/sub2.h"
namespace model {
  class Top {
  public:
    Sub1 sub1;
    Sub2 sub2;
    Var var;
    Var process(Var x) {
      var = sub1.process(x);
      return sub2.process(var);
    }
  };
}
// Experimental src_expr/top.h
#include "src_expr/sub1.h" // Have to edit include paths!
#include "src_expr/sub2.h"
namespace model_expr { // Have to rename namespaces!
  class Top {
  public:
    Sub1 sub1;
    Sub2 sub2;
    Var var;
    Var process(Var x) {
      var = sub1.process(x);
      return sub2.process(var);
    }
  };
}
// test.cpp
#include "src/top.h" // golden
#include "src_expr/top.h" // experimental
void test(std::vector<Var> xvec) {
  model::Top top_gold;
  model_expr::Top top_expr;
  for (const auto& x : xvec) {
    Var y_gold = top_gold.process(x);
    Var y_expr = top_expr.process(x);
    assert(y_gold == y_expr);
    assert(top_gold.var == top_expr.var);
  }
}
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  • What libraries are you using? Commented Aug 6, 2019 at 23:18
  • Sounds like you need a more formal unit testing tool like Catch2 or something like it. Define the tests that nail down exactly how implementation A behaves, then write B to pass the same tests.
    – tadman
    Commented Aug 6, 2019 at 23:21
  • If you can define an abstract interface to your classes (i.e. reduce the interaction between your classes and the calling code to just a set of methods to be called) then you can write a "Decorator" class that implements that interface, holds an instance of each of your two classes as a child object, and passes each call to any of its methods on to the like-named method of both children, and compares their results. Then your calling code can just hold a pointer-to-the-interface, and doesn't need to be modified to enable testing. Commented Aug 6, 2019 at 23:22

1 Answer 1

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One approach is to make your code mock-able.

That means you provide an interface and only interact with it. Methids are as pure as possible (including the object as both input and output). You create instances through a mock-able factory object.

Then write an implementation of the interface that creates both versions, compares their outputs, errors if they differ, and behaves like one of them externally.

Sadly this can require significant refactoring; ideally you do this before you wrote the first version.

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