6

I have a property that only gets computed once per instance and that uses None as a guard value. This is a pretty common pattern with properties.

What's the best way to annotate it?

edit/clarification:

This question is about how to use mypy to validate my property's code. Not about how to refactor the code. The property's type is just the way I want it, as a non-Optional int. Assume, for example, that the downstream code will do print(book.the_answer+1).

The, incorrect, assignment of a string and a None are fully intentional to break the contract defined by the property's expectations and I wanted mypy to flag them.

Try #1

class Book:

    def __init__(self, title):
        self.title = title

    _the_answer = None #line 6
    # _the_answer : int = None #line 7

    def __str__(self):
        return "%s => %s" % (self.title, self.the_answer)

    @property
    def the_answer(self)->int:
        """always should be an int.  Not an Optional int"""
        if self._the_answer is None:
            if "Guide" in self.title:
                #this is OK
                self._the_answer = 42
            elif "Woolf" in self.title:
                #this is wrong, mypy should flag it.
                self._the_answer = "?, I haven't read it"  # line 21
            else:
                #mypy should also flag this
                self._the_answer = None #line 24

        return self._the_answer #line 26

print(Book("Hitchhiker's Guide"))
print(Book("Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf?"))
print(Book("War and Peace"))

Output:

Hitchhiker's Guide => 42
Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf? => ?, I haven't read it
War and Peace => None

Mypy's output:

test_prop2.py:21: error: Incompatible types in assignment (expression has type "str", variable has type "Optional[int]")
test_prop2.py:26: error: Incompatible return value type (got "Optional[int]", expected "int")

There's really nothing necessarily wrong with line 26, it all depends on what got assigned in the IFs. 21 and 24 are both incorrect, but mypy only catches 21.

Note: that if I change the property return to return cast(int, self._the_answer) #line 26 then it leaves that alone at least.

If I add typing to the guard value, _the_answer:

Try #2, type the guard value as well:

class Book:

    def __init__(self, title):
        self.title = title

    #_the_answer = None
    _the_answer : int = None #line 7

    def __str__(self):
        return "%s => %s" % (self.title, self.the_answer)

    @property
    def the_answer(self)->int:
        """always should be an int.  Not an Optional int"""
        if self._the_answer is None:
            if "Guide" in self.title:
                #this is OK
                self._the_answer = 42
            elif "Woolf" in self.title:
                #this is wrong.  mypy flags it.
                self._the_answer = "?, I haven't read it"  # line 21
            else:
                #mypy should also flag this
                self._the_answer = None #line 24

        return self._the_answer #line 26

print(Book("Hitchhiker's Guide"))
print(Book("Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf?"))
print(Book("War and Peace"))

Same running output, but mypy has different errors:

test_prop2.py:7: error: Incompatible types in assignment (expression has type "None", variable has type "int")

and it doesn't type check lines 21, 24 and 26 (actually it did once but then I changed the code and it hasnt since).

And if I change line #7 to _the_answer : int = cast(int, None), then mypy is entirely silent and warns me about nothing.

Versions:

mypy   0.720
Python 3.6.8
  • from typing import Union, and annotate it with Union[int, str, None] – L3viathan Aug 7 at 6:27
  • but str is wrong and I need it caught. so is None - that’s the nature of a property guard value. anyway, which lines are you proposing to annotate? – JL Peyret Aug 7 at 6:29
  • _the_answer : Optional[int] = None #line 7 can work with str but not None and also requires you to change the return type to Optional[int]. I think the only best way should be using something like -1 as guard value... – Sraw Aug 7 at 6:36
  • Why use _the_answer = 42 instead of _the_answer = "42"? There is a difference between a number and a string that happens to be the representation of a number. – chepner Aug 7 at 18:15
  • 1
    @chepner very much on purpose. I wanted to see how I could leverage mypy to analyze typed properties. The int is on purpose. The wrongful assignment of a string as well - the whole point is to see how mypy can be used to catch it. In the meantime I have found something that seems to work and will post it when I am on my laptop - I’ve removed typing from the guard var, but added an extra int-typed var right above the if statement. Thats the variable used to assign values and both None and string assignments get flagged. – JL Peyret Aug 7 at 19:25
0

While mypy may not be flagging the exact lines you want to have flagged, it is legitimately reporting that your the_answer implementation is unsound and is not guaranteed to return an int.

Both of your two errors:

test_prop2.py:21: error: Incompatible types in assignment (expression has type "str", variable has type "Optional[int]")
test_prop2.py:26: error: Incompatible return value type (got "Optional[int]", expected "int")

...are actually correct. Mypy inferred that your _the_answer field has a type of Optional[int] because the very first time you try assigning a non-None value to that field, you assign an int. (The first branch of your if statement).

The second error is also correct: since you assign None to self._the_answer on line 24, the return value is clearly going to be None in some cases. So, mypy reports you have an error when you actually try returning your field.

It would be incorrect for mypy to actually report an error on line 24. Since _the_answer is inferred to be type Optional[int], there's really nothing inherently wrong with assigning a None value to that field. So instead, mypy defers the error until it knows for certain that there's something wrong.

Note that if you actually fix your code, mypy will stop reporting any errors. For example, the following program type-checks cleanly:

class Book:
    def __init__(self, title):
        self.title = title

    _the_answer = None

    def __str__(self):
        return "%s => %s" % (self.title, self.the_answer)

    @property
    def the_answer(self) -> int:
        if self._the_answer is None:
            if "Guide" in self.title:
                self._the_answer = 42
            else:
                self._the_answer = 100

        return self._the_answer

Here, mypy is capable of deducing that self._the_answer will always be an int in all cases by the time we hit the return, so realizes that the type of _the_answer can temporarily be narrowed to int within just that function.

Mypy's type inference algorithm isn't perfect, of course. If your actual code is more complicated then this and mypy doesn't seem to infer the right thing, you can help it along by adding in a few assert isinstance(self._the_answer, int) to force mypy to narrow the type.

You can check what mypy thinks the type of your field is at any point by sprinkling in a few reveal_type(self._the_answer) -- when mypy encounters that pseudo-function, it'll report what type it thinks that expression is in addition to reporting any type errors.


Somewhat unrelated, I'd also recommend you explicitly annotate your _the_answer field -- e.g. do _the_answer: Optional[int] = None on line seven.

Right now, mypy is inferring that _the_answer is Optional[int] just by checking the first non-None assignment. But if you were to rearrange your code so that you accidentally have the (incorrect) string assignment come first, mypy would infer the type to be Optional[str] instead. This is obviously somewhat fragile.

0

I would make two changes to your code:

  1. Don't predefine _the_answer at all; create it on demand when the_answer is first accessed.

  2. _the_answer should always be a string; you aren't going to do math or anything else number-like with 42; it's just a label that happens to look like a number. Likewise, no answer is "", not None. If you need to be more specific about there being no answer, raise an exception instead and let the caller deal with it.

With this in mind, your code becomes

class Book:

    def __init__(self, title):
        self.title = title

    def __str__(self):
        return "%s => %s" % (self.title, self.the_answer)

    @property
    def the_answer(self)->str:
        try:
            answer = self._the_answer
        except AttributeError:
            if "Guide" in self.title:
                answer = "42"
            elif "Woolf" in self.title:
                answer = "?, I haven't read it"
            else:
                answer = ""
                # or raise ValueError("%s has no answer" % (self.title,))
            self._the_answer = answer

        return answer

Now you aren't in the situation of having to provide a static type annotation for a variable whose type can change at run-time.

0

After a night's sleep I got the solution: splitting up the typing responsibilities from the guarding responsibilities.

  • the guard variable, self/cls._the_answer is left untyped.

  • In line 15, right under the guard condition which tells me the instance hasn't had that property computed yet, I type-hint a new variable name, answer.

Both incorrect assignments, in 21 and 24 are now flagged.

from typing import cast
class Book:
    def __init__(self, title):
        self.title = title

    _the_answer = None

    def __str__(self):
        return "%s => %s" % (self.title, self.the_answer)

    @property
    def the_answer(self)->int:
        """always should be an int.  Not an Optional int"""
        if self._the_answer is None:
            answer : int  #line 15:  👈  this is where the typing happens
            if "Guide" in self.title:
                #this is OK  ✅
                answer = 42
            elif "Woolf" in self.title:
                #this is wrong  ❌
                answer = "?, I haven't read it"  # line 21
            else:
                #mypy should also flag this  ❌
                answer = None #line 24
            self._the_answer = answer
        return cast(int, self._the_answer) #line 26

print(Book("Hitchhiker's Guide"))
print(Book("Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf?"))
print(Book("War and Peace"))

Same actual run output as before.

mypy output:

Now, both problem lines are flagged ;-)

test_prop4.py:21: error: Incompatible types in assignment (expression has type "str", variable has type "int")
test_prop4.py:24: error: Incompatible types in assignment (expression has type "None", variable has type "int")

What about the cast in line 26? What if nothing assigns answer in the if statements? Without the cast, I'd probably be getting a warning. Could I have assigned a default value as in answer : int = 0 in line 15?

I could, but unless there really is a good application-level default, I'd rather have things blow up right away at execution (UnboundLocalError on answer) rather than making mypy happy but having to chase down some weird runtime value.

That last bit is totally dependent on what your application is expecting, a default value may be the better choice.

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